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Femininity

About: Femininity is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7327 publications have been published within this topic receiving 220147 citations. The topic is also known as: femaleness & womanliness.


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Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as mentioned in this paper are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

21,123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new sex-role inventory is described that treats masculinity and femininity as two independent dimensions, thereby making it possible to characterize a person as masculine, feminine, or "androgynous" as a function of the difference between his or her endorsement of masculine and feminine personality characteristics.
Abstract: This article describes the development of a new sex-role inventory that treats masculinity and femininity as two independent dimensions, thereby making it possible to characterize a person as masculine, feminine, or "androgynous" as a function of the difference between his or her endorsement of masculine and feminine personality characteristics. Normative data are presented, as well as the results of various psychometric analyses. The major findings of conceptual interest are: (a) the dimensions of masculinity and femininity are empirically as well as logically independent; (6) the concept of psychological androgyny is a reliable one; and (c) highly sex-typed scores do not reflect a general tendency to respond in a socially desirable direction, but rather a specific tendency to describe oneself in accordance with sex-typed standards of desirable behavior for men and women. Both in psychology and in society at large, masculinity and femininity have long been conceptualized as bipolar ends of a single continuum; accordingly, a person has had to be either masculine or feminine, but not both. This sex-role dichotomy has served to obscure two very plausible hypotheses: first, that many individuals might be "androgynous" ; that is, they might be both masculine and feminine, both assertive and yielding, both instrumental and expressive—depending on the situational appropriateness of these various behaviors; and conversely, that strongly sex-typed individuals might be seriously limited in the range of behaviors available to them as they move from situation to situation. According to both Kagan (1964) and Kohlberg (1966), the highly sex-typed individual is motivated to keep his behavior consistent with an internalized sex-role standard, a goal that he presumably accomplishes by suppressing any behavior that might be con

7,984 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gender schema theory as mentioned in this paper proposes that the phenomenon of sex typing derives, in part, from gender-based schematic processing, from a generalized readiness to process information on the basis of the sex-linked associations that constitute the gender schema.
Abstract: Gender schema theory proposes that the phenomenon of sex typing derives, in part, from gender-based schematic processing, from a generalized readiness to process information on the basis of the sex-linked associations that constitute the gender schema. In particular, the theory proposes that sex typing results from the fact that the self-concept itself gets assimilated to the gender schema. Several studies are described which demonstrate that sex-typed individuals do, in fact, have a greater readiness to process information—including information about the self—in terms of the gender schema. It is speculated that such gender-based schematic processing derives, in part, from the society's ubiquitous insistence on the functional importance of the gender dichotomy. The political implications of gender schema theory are discussed, as is the relationship of the theory to the concept of androgyny. The distinction between male and female serves as a basic organizing principle for every human culture. Although societies differ in the specific tasks they assign to the two sexes, all societies allocate adult roles on the basis of sex and anticipate this allocation in the socialization of their children. Not only are boys and girls expected to acquire sex-specific skills, they are also expected to have or to acquire sex-specific self

3,374 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Mystery in Broad Daylight: Gender Formation and Psychoanalysis is described as a "mystery in broad daylight": the body and social practice of women in the context of political theory.
Abstract: Preface. 1. Some Facts in the Case. Part I: Theorising Gender. 2. Historical Roots of Contemporary Theory. 3. Current Frameworks. Part II: The Structure of Gender Relations. 4. The Body and Social Practice. 5. Main Structures: Labour, Power and Cathexis. 6. Gender Regimes and the Gender Order. 7. Historical Dynamic. Part III: Femininity and Masculinity. 8. Sexual Character. 9. The Mystery in Broad Daylight: Gender Formation and Psychoanalysis. 10. Personality as Practice. Part IV Sexual Politics. 11. Sexual Ideology. 12. Political Practice. 13. Present and Future.

2,709 citations

Book
10 Sep 1993
TL;DR: This paper argued that white women and men were placed, respectively, as victim and rescuer in the discourse against interracial sexuality, vis-a-vis the supposed sexual threat posed by men of color toward white women.
Abstract: This chapter seeks to explain the invisibility and modes of visibility of racism, race difference, and whiteness. It discusses a feminist commitment to drawing on women’s daily lives as a resource for analyzing society. The chapter draws on both theoretical and substantive analyses of race, racism, and colonialism in the United States and beyond. It argues that the discourse against interracial relationships entails specifically racialized constructions of white femininity in relation to racialized masculinities. The chapter suggests that white women and men were placed, respectively, as victim and rescuer in the discourse against interracial sexuality, vis-a-vis the supposed sexual threat posed by men of color toward white women. It also argues that both heterosexual and lesbian white women’s strategies for coping with the burdens that racism placed on interracial couples seemed at times to be distinctively “female” ones.

2,389 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023369
2022800
2021222
2020269
2019303
2018319