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Field electron emission

About: Field electron emission is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 16909 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 298243 citation(s). The topic is also known as: field emission.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a metastable form of amorphous carbon with significant sp3 bonding. DLC is a semiconductor with a high mechanical hardness, chemical inertness, and optical transparency. This review will describe the deposition methods, deposition mechanisms, characterisation methods, electronic structure, gap states, defects, doping, luminescence, field emission, mechanical properties and some applications of DLCs. The films have widespread applications as protective coatings in areas, such as magnetic storage disks, optical windows and micro-electromechanical devices (MEMs).

5,010 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Nov 1995-Science
Abstract: A high-intensity electron gun based on field emission from a film of aligned carbon nanotubes has been made. The gun consists of a nanotube film with a 1-millimeter-diameter grid about 20 micrometers above it. Field-emission current densities of about 0.1 milliampere per square centimeter were observed for applied voltages as low as 200 volts, and current densities greater than 100 milliamperes per square centimeter have been realized at 700 volts. The gun is air-stable, easy and inexpensive to fabricate, and functions stably and reliably for long times (short-term fluctuations are on the order of 10 percent). The entire gun is only about 0.2 millimeter thick and can be produced with virtually no restrictions on its area, from less than 1 square millimeter to hundreds of square centimeters, making it suitable for flat panel display applications.

3,068 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Jan 1999-Science
TL;DR: The synthesis of massive arrays of monodispersed carbon nanotubes that are self-oriented on patterned porous silicon and plain silicon substrates is reported and the mechanisms of nanotube growth and self-orientation are elucidated.
Abstract: The synthesis of massive arrays of monodispersed carbon nanotubes that are self-oriented on patterned porous silicon and plain silicon substrates is reported. The approach involves chemical vapor deposition, catalytic particle size control by substrate design, nanotube positioning by patterning, and nanotube self-assembly for orientation. The mechanisms of nanotube growth and self-orientation are elucidated. The well-ordered nanotubes can be used as electron field emission arrays. Scaling up of the synthesis process should be entirely compatible with the existing semiconductor processes, and should allow the development of nanotube devices integrated into silicon technology.

3,051 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: By combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, a strong correlation is observed between the green 510 nm emission, the free‐carrier concentration, and the density of singly ionized oxygen vacancies in commercial ZnO phosphor powders. From these results, we demonstrate that free‐carrier depletion at the particle surface, and its effect on the ionization state of the oxygen vacancy, can strongly impact the green emission intensity. The relevance of these observations with respect to low‐voltage field emission displays is discussed.

1,815 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Dec 1996-Science
TL;DR: Large-scale synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes was achieved by using a method based on chemical vapor deposition catalyzed by iron nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica to form an aligned array of isolated tubes with spacings between the tubes.
Abstract: Large-scale synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes was achieved by using a method based on chemical vapor deposition catalyzed by iron nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica. Scanning electron microscope images show that the nanotubes are approximately perpendicular to the surface of the silica and form an aligned array of isolated tubes with spacings between the tubes of about 100 nanometers. The tubes are up to about 50 micrometers long and well graphitized. The growth direction of the nanotubes may be controlled by the pores from which the nanotubes grow.

1,742 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202210
2021250
2020314
2019337
2018427
2017437