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Film studies

About: Film studies is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3312 publications have been published within this topic receiving 44050 citations. The topic is also known as: cinema studies & film.


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Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this paper, Bordwell and Thompson's Film Art has been the best-selling and most widely respected introduction to the analysis of cinema, supporting a skills-centered approach supported by examples from many periods and countries.
Abstract: Film is an art form with a language and an aesthetic all its own. Since 1979, David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson's Film Art has been the best-selling and most widely respected introduction to the analysis of cinema. Taking a skills-centered approach supported by examples from many periods and countries, the authors help students develop a core set of analytical skills that will enrich their understanding of any film, in any genre. In-depth examples deepen students' appreciation for how creative choices by filmmakers affect what viewers experience and how they respond.

1,561 citations

Book ChapterDOI
02 Aug 2004
TL;DR: Sewell as discussed by the authors argues that such an approach is not incompatible with the Geertzian notion of culture as a system of meanings, and he points out some shortcomings of this approach in order to explain the rise of alternative conceptions which sought to couch culture more in the realm of the non-cognitive or habitual practices of our daily lives.
Abstract: In the late 1970s, an emerging “sociology of culture” began by applying standard sociological methods to studies of the production and marketing of cultural artifacts – music, art, drama, and literature. By the late 1980s, the work of cultural sociologists had broken out of the study of cultureproducing institutions and moved toward studying the place of meaning in social life more generally. Feminism, which in the 1970s was concerned above all to document women’s experiences, has increasingly turned to analyzing the discursive production of gender difference. Since the mid-1980s the new quasi-discipline of cultural studies has grown explosively in a variety of different academic niches – for example, in programs or departments of film studies, literature, performance studies, or communications. In political science, which is well known for its propensity to chase headlines, interest in cultural questions has been revived by the recent prominence of religious fundamentalism, nationalism, and ethnicity, which look like the most potent sources of political conflict in the contemporary world. This frenetic rush to the study of culture has everywhere been bathed, to a greaterrespectively), and he argues that such an approach is not incompatible with the Geertzian notion of culture as a system of meanings. Sewell points out some shortcomings of the Geertzian approach in order to explain the rise of alternative conceptions which sought to couch culture more in the realm of the non-cognitive or habitual practices of our daily lives. Sewell insists there is nothing mutually exclusive about these approaches. This argument is one that readers should keep in mind when considering the later readings by both AbuLughod and Latham in Part One.

565 citations

Book
07 Feb 1994
TL;DR: Stacey et al. as mentioned in this paper investigated how female spectators understood Hollywood stars in the 1940's and 1950's, and demonstrated the importance of cultural and national location for the meanings of female spectatorship, giving a new direction to questions of popular culture and female desire.
Abstract: In a historical investigation of the pleasures of cinema, Star Gazing puts female spectators back into theories of spectatorship. Combining film theory with a rich body of ethnographic research, Jackie Stacey investigates how female spectators understood Hollywood stars in the 1940's and 1950's. Her study challenges the universalism of psychoanalytic theories of female spectatorship which have dominated the feminist agenda within film studies for over two decades. Drawing on letters and questionnaires from over three hundred keen cinema-goers, Stacey investigates the significance of certain Hollywood stars in women's memories of wartime and postwar Britain. Three key processes of spectatorship - escapism, identification and consumption - are explored in detail in terms of their multiple and changing meanings for female spectators at this time. Star Gazing demonstrates the importance of cultural and national location for the meanings of female spectatorship, giving a new direction to questions of popular culture and female desire.

488 citations

BookDOI
13 Sep 1996
TL;DR: The Third Eye as mentioned in this paper explores early-twentieth-century representations of non-Western indigenous peoples in films ranging from the documentary to the spectacular to the scientific, revealing the collaboration of anthropology and popular culture in Western constructions of race, gender, nation, and empire.
Abstract: Charting the intersection of technology and ideology, cultural production and social science, Fatimah Tobing Rony explores early-twentieth-century representations of non-Western indigenous peoples in films ranging from the documentary to the spectacular to the scientific. Turning the gaze of the ethnographic camera back onto itself, bringing the perspective of a third eye to bear on the invention of the primitive other, Rony reveals the collaboration of anthropology and popular culture in Western constructions of race, gender, nation, and empire. Her work demonstrates the significance of these constructions - and, more generally, of ethnographic cinema - for understanding issues of identity. In films as seemingly dissimilar as Nanook of the North, King Kong, and research footage of West Africans from an 1895 Paris ethnographic exposition, Rony exposes a shared fascination with - and anxiety over - race. She shows how photographic "realism" contributed to popular and scientific notions of evolution, race, and civilisation, and how, in turn, anthropology understood and critiqued its own use of photographic technology. Looking beyond negative Western images of the Other, Rony considers performance strategies that disrupt these images - for example, the use of open resistance, recontextualisation, and parody in the films of Katherine Dunham and Zora Neale Hurston, or the performances of Josephine Baker. She also draws on the work of contemporary artists such as Lorna Simpson and Victor Masayesva Jr., and writers such as Frantz Fanon and James Baldwin, who unveil the language of racialisation in ethnographic cinema. Elegantly written and richly illustrated, innovative in theory and original in method, The Third Eye is a remarkable interdisciplinary contribution to critical thought in film studies, anthropology, cultural studies, art history, postcolonial studies, and women's studies.

437 citations

Book
28 Mar 2021
TL;DR: Mirzoeff and Rogoff as mentioned in this paper discuss the subject of visual culture and discuss the role of the camera in the visual space of the digital space in the 21st century.
Abstract: PART 1. INTRODUCTIONS/PROVOCATIONS/CONVERSATIONS The Subject of Visual Culture Nicholas Mirzoeff, Studying Visual Culture Irit Rogoff, Narrativizing Visual Culture: Towards a Polycentric Aesthetics Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, Voices from the Web Various, Kino-I, Kino-World: Notes on the Cinematic Mode of Production Jonathan L. Beller, Conversations in Visual Culture W.J.T. Mitchell PART 2. PLUG IN THEORY Optics Rene Descartes, The Fetishism of the Commodity Karl Marx, Double-Consciousness W.E.B. Dubois, Woman in a Mirror Marshall McLuhan, The Fact of Blackness Frantz Fanon, Rhetoric of the Image Roland Barthes, Four Fundamental Concepts of Pyschoanalysis Jacques Lacan, The Society of the Spectacle Guy Debord, Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses Louis Althusser, Simulacra and Simulations Jean Baudrillard, Prohibition, Psychoanalysis and the Heterosexual Matrix Judith Butler Virtual Bodies and Flickering Signifiers N. Katherine Hayles PART 3. GLOBAL/DIGITAL (a.) Imagining Globalization Here and Now Arjun Appadurai, Remaking Passports: Visual Thought and the debate on multiculturalism Nestor Garcia Canclini, Ethnicity and Internationality: New British Art and Diaspora-Based Blackness Kobena Mercer, The Multiple Viewpoint: Diaspora and Visual Culture Nicholas Mirzoeff, Gender, Nationalism and Internationalism in Japanese contemporary art Lisa Bloom, (b.) The Space of the Digital of Other Spaces Michel Foucault, Spectres of Cyberspace Geoffrey Batchen, Othering Cyberspace Wendy Chun, Where Do You Want to Go Today? Cybernetic Tourism, the Internet and Transnationality Lisa Nakamura, Eden by Wire: Webcameras and the Telepresent Landscape Thomas Campanella, Satellite and Cyber Visualities: Analyzing the Digital Earth Lisa Parks PART 4. SPECTACLE AND DISPLAY Spectacle, Display, Surveillance: Historical Citizenship and the Fremantle Prison Follies Frederick Wiseman, Come to Western Australia Toby Miller, Visual Stories Anne Reynolds, The Great Un-American Numbers Game Andrew Ross, The Wall, the Screen and the Image: The Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Marita Sturken, The Prison House of Culture: Why African Art? Why the Guggenheim? Why Now? Michelle Wallace, Videotech John Fiske Cinema After Film, Television After the Networks, The Mobilized and Virtual Gaze in Modernity: Flaneur/Flaneuse Anne Friedberg, What is Digital Cinema? Lev Manovich, Film and the Digital in Visual Studies: Film Studies in the Era of Convergence, Lisa Cartwright, Kung-Fu Cinema and Frugality May Joseph, The Video Public Sphere David Joselit Tara McPherson PART 5. VISUAL COLONIALISM/VISUAL TRANSCULTURE Visual Colonialism, Visual Regimes of Colonisation: Aboriginal Seeing and European Vision in Australia Terry Smith, Orientalism and the Exhibitionary Order Timothy Mitchell, Soft-Soaping Empire: Commodity Racism and Imperial Advertising Anne McClintock, from The Colonial Harem Malek Alloula, Vodun Art, Social History and the Slave Trade Suzanne Preston Blier Identity and Transculture His Masters Obi: Machine Magic, Violence and Transculturation Jill Casid, Passing for White, Passing for Black Adrian Piper, The Other History of Intercultural Performance Coco Fusco, Photography and the Substance of the Image Olu Oguibe, Engendering New Worlds: Allegories of Rape and Reconciliation Orianna Baddeley PART 6. THE GAZE, THE BODY, AND SEXUALITY (a) The Gaze and Sexuality Ideal Masculinities: An Anatomy of Power Anthea Callen, The Forbidden Gaze: Women Artists and the Male Nude in Late Nineteenth-Century France Tamar Garb, Reduplicative Desires

433 citations


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Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202321
202261
202150
202081
201980
2018126