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Topic

Generalization

About: Generalization is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 23512 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 483549 citation(s). The topic is also known as: generalisation & Generalize.


Papers
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01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Presenting a method for determining the necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency of learning process, the author covers function estimates from small data pools, applying these estimations to real-life problems, and much more.
Abstract: A comprehensive look at learning and generalization theory. The statistical theory of learning and generalization concerns the problem of choosing desired functions on the basis of empirical data. Highly applicable to a variety of computer science and robotics fields, this book offers lucid coverage of the theory as a whole. Presenting a method for determining the necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency of learning process, the author covers function estimates from small data pools, applying these estimations to real-life problems, and much more.

26,121 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1992
TL;DR: A training algorithm that maximizes the margin between the training patterns and the decision boundary is presented, applicable to a wide variety of the classification functions, including Perceptrons, polynomials, and Radial Basis Functions.
Abstract: A training algorithm that maximizes the margin between the training patterns and the decision boundary is presented. The technique is applicable to a wide variety of the classification functions, including Perceptrons, polynomials, and Radial Basis Functions. The effective number of parameters is adjusted automatically to match the complexity of the problem. The solution is expressed as a linear combination of supporting patterns. These are the subset of training patterns that are closest to the decision boundary. Bounds on the generalization performance based on the leave-one-out method and the VC-dimension are given. Experimental results on optical character recognition problems demonstrate the good generalization obtained when compared with other learning algorithms.

10,033 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A goal of statistical language modeling is to learn the joint probability function of sequences of words in a language. This is intrinsically difficult because of the curse of dimensionality: a word sequence on which the model will be tested is likely to be different from all the word sequences seen during training. Traditional but very successful approaches based on n-grams obtain generalization by concatenating very short overlapping sequences seen in the training set. We propose to fight the curse of dimensionality by learning a distributed representation for words which allows each training sentence to inform the model about an exponential number of semantically neighboring sentences. The model learns simultaneously (1) a distributed representation for each word along with (2) the probability function for word sequences, expressed in terms of these representations. Generalization is obtained because a sequence of words that has never been seen before gets high probability if it is made of words that are similar (in the sense of having a nearby representation) to words forming an already seen sentence. Training such large models (with millions of parameters) within a reasonable time is itself a significant challenge. We report on experiments using neural networks for the probability function, showing on two text corpora that the proposed approach significantly improves on state-of-the-art n-gram models, and that the proposed approach allows to take advantage of longer contexts.

6,194 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A generalization of the numerical renormalization-group procedure used first by Wilson for the Kondo problem is presented and it is shown that this formulation is optimal in a certain sense.
Abstract: A generalization of the numerical renormalization-group procedure used first by Wilson for the Kondo problem is presented. It is shown that this formulation is optimal in a certain sense. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of this approach, results from numerical real-space renormalization-group calculations for Heisenberg chains are presented.

4,694 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conclusion is that for almost any real-world generalization problem one should use some version of stacked generalization to minimize the generalization error rate.
Abstract: This paper introduces stacked generalization, a scheme for minimizing the generalization error rate of one or more generalizers. Stacked generalization works by deducing the biases of the generalizer(s) with respect to a provided learning set. This deduction proceeds by generalizing in a second space whose inputs are (for example) the guesses of the original generalizers when taught with part of the learning set and trying to guess the rest of it, and whose output is (for example) the correct guess. When used with multiple generalizers, stacked generalization can be seen as a more sophisticated version of cross-validation, exploiting a strategy more sophisticated than cross-validation's crude winner-takes-all for combining the individual generalizers. When used with a single generalizer, stacked generalization is a scheme for estimating (and then correcting for) the error of a generalizer which has been trained on a particular learning set and then asked a particular question. After introducing stacked generalization and justifying its use, this paper presents two numerical experiments. The first demonstrates how stacked generalization improves upon a set of separate generalizers for the NETtalk task of translating text to phonemes. The second demonstrates how stacked generalization improves the performance of a single surface-fitter. With the other experimental evidence in the literature, the usual arguments supporting cross-validation, and the abstract justifications presented in this paper, the conclusion is that for almost any real-world generalization problem one should use some version of stacked generalization to minimize the generalization error rate. This paper ends by discussing some of the variations of stacked generalization, and how it touches on other fields like chaos theory.

4,693 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202226
20211,691
20201,483
20191,288
20181,106
2017858