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Genocide

About: Genocide is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 12493 publications have been published within this topic receiving 196962 citations. The topic is also known as: Genocide.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism Land is life or, at least, land is necessary for life Thus contests for land can be—indeed, often are—contests for war crimes as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism Land is life—or, at least, land is necessary for life Thus contests for land can be—indeed, often are—contests for li

3,214 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: The Legitimacy of an Expanding Global Bureaucracy as discussed by the authors is an example of such an expansion of global bureaucracies, and it has been studied extensively in the literature.
Abstract: 1. Bureaucratizing World Politics2. International Organizations as Bureaucracies3. Expertise and Power at the International Monetary Fund4. Defining Refugees and Voluntary Repatriation at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees5. Genocide and the Peacekeeping Culture at the United Nations6. The Legitimacy of an Expanding Global BureaucracyList of Abbreviations Notes Bibliography Index

1,766 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the connections between Biodiversity and Linguistic and Cultural Diversity, and advocate for Linguistically Human Rights in Education. But they do not discuss the role of the state in this process.
Abstract: Contents: Preface. Introduction. Part I: Setting the Scene. What Is Happening to the Languages of the World. Connections Between Biodiversity and Linguistic and Cultural Diversity. Mother Tongue(s), Culture, Ethnicity, and Self-Determination. Linguistic Diversity--Curse or Blessing? To Be Maintained or Not? Why? Part II: Linguistic Genocide, State Policies, and Globalisation. State Policies Towards Languages--Linguistic Genocide, Language Death, or Support for Languages? Globalisation, Power, and Control. Part III: Struggle Against Linguistic Genocide and for Linguistic Human Rights in Education. Linguistic Human Rights. Linguistic Human Rights in Education? Alternatives to Genocide and Dystopia.

1,358 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper defined the crisis of postcolonial Citizenship: Settler and Native as Political Identities 19 2. The origins of Hutu and Tutsi 41 3. The Racialization of the Hutu/Tutsi Difference under Colonialism 76 4. The ''Social Revolution\" of 1959 103 5. The Second Republic: Redefining Tutsis from Race to Ethnicity 132 6. The Politics of Indigeneity in Uganda: Background to the RPF Invasion 159 7. The Civil War and the Genocide 185 8. Conclusion: Political Reform after Genocide 264 Notes 283
Abstract: List of Abbreviations ix Preface and Acknowledgments xi Introduction: Thinking about Genocide 3 1. Defining the Crisis of Postcolonial Citizenship: Settler and Native as Political Identities 19 2. The Origins of Hutu and Tutsi 41 3. The Racialization of the Hutu/Tutsi Difference under Colonialism 76 4. The \"Social Revolution\" of 1959 103 5. The Second Republic: Redefining Tutsi from Race to Ethnicity 132 6. The Politics of Indigeneity in Uganda: Background to the RPF Invasion 159 7. The Civil War and the Genocide 185 8. Tutsi Power in Rwanda and the Citizenship Crisis in Eastern Congo 234 Conclusion: Political Reform after Genocide 264 Notes 283 Bibliography 343 Index 357

1,335 citations

Book
Steven Pinker1
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: Pierro et al. as mentioned in this paper argue that violence has been diminishing for millennia and we may be living in the most peaceful time in our species's existence. But they do not explain why this is the case.
Abstract: Selected by "The New York Times Book Review" as a Notable Book of the Year The author of "The New York Times" bestseller "The Stuff of Thought" offers a controversial history of violence. Faced with the ceaseless stream of news about war, crime, and terrorism, one could easily think we live in the most violent age ever seen. Yet as New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker shows in this startling and engaging new work, just the opposite is true: violence has been diminishing for millennia and we may be living in the most peaceful time in our species's existence. For most of history, war, slavery, infanticide, child abuse, assassinations, pogroms, gruesome punishments, deadly quarrels, and genocide were ordinary features of life. But today, Pinker shows (with the help of more than a hundred graphs and maps) all these forms of violence have dwindled and are widely condemned. How has this happened? This groundbreaking book continues Pinker's exploration of the essence of human nature, mixing psychology and history to provide a remarkable picture of an increasingly nonviolent world. The key, he explains, is to understand our intrinsic motives- the inner demons that incline us toward violence and the better angels that steer us away-and how changing circumstances have allowed our better angels to prevail. Exploding fatalist myths about humankind's inherent violence and the curse of modernity, this ambitious and provocative book is sure to be hotly debated in living rooms and the Pentagon alike, and will challenge and change the way we think about our society.

1,290 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023530
20221,097
2021342
2020435
2019472
2018570