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Topic

High-dynamic-range imaging

About: High-dynamic-range imaging is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 766 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 22577 citation(s).


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
03 Aug 1997
TL;DR: This work discusses how this work is applicable in many areas of computer graphics involving digitized photographs, including image-based modeling, image compositing, and image processing, and demonstrates a few applications of having high dynamic range radiance maps.
Abstract: We present a method of recovering high dynamic range radiance maps from photographs taken with conventional imaging equipment. In our method, multiple photographs of the scene are taken with different amounts of exposure. Our algorithm uses these differently exposed photographs to recover the response function of the imaging process, up to factor of scale, using the assumption of reciprocity. With the known response function, the algorithm can fuse the multiple photographs into a single, high dynamic range radiance map whose pixel values are proportional to the true radiance values in the scene. We demonstrate our method on images acquired with both photochemical and digital imaging processes. We discuss how this work is applicable in many areas of computer graphics involving digitized photographs, including image-based modeling, image compositing, and image processing. Lastly, we demonstrate a few applications of having high dynamic range radiance maps, such as synthesizing realistic motion blur and simulating the response of the human visual system.

2,775 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2002
TL;DR: The work presented in this paper leverages the time-tested techniques of photographic practice to develop a new tone reproduction operator and uses and extends the techniques developed by Ansel Adams to deal with digital images.
Abstract: A classic photographic task is the mapping of the potentially high dynamic range of real world luminances to the low dynamic range of the photographic print. This tone reproduction problem is also faced by computer graphics practitioners who map digital images to a low dynamic range print or screen. The work presented in this paper leverages the time-tested techniques of photographic practice to develop a new tone reproduction operator. In particular, we use and extend the techniques developed by Ansel Adams to deal with digital images. The resulting algorithm is simple and produces good results for a wide variety of images.

1,593 citations

Book
28 May 2010
TL;DR: The Human Visual System and HDR Tone Mapping and Frequency Domain and Gradient Domain Tone Reproduction and an Image-Based Lighting List of Symbols References Index are presented.
Abstract: Foreword Preface 1 Introduction 2 Light And Color 3 HDR Image Encodings 4 HDR Image Capture 5 Display Devices 6 The Human Visual System and HDR Tone Mapping 7 Spatial Tone Reproduction 8 Frequency Domain and Gradient Domain Tone Reproduction 9 Image-Based Lighting List of Symbols References Index

1,398 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2002
TL;DR: The results demonstrate that the method is capable of drastic dynamic range compression, while preserving fine details and avoiding common artifacts, such as halos, gradient reversals, or loss of local contrast.
Abstract: We present a new method for rendering high dynamic range images on conventional displays. Our method is conceptually simple, computationally efficient, robust, and easy to use. We manipulate the gradient field of the luminance image by attenuating the magnitudes of large gradients. A new, low dynamic range image is then obtained by solving a Poisson equation on the modified gradient field. Our results demonstrate that the method is capable of drastic dynamic range compression, while preserving fine details and avoiding common artifacts, such as halos, gradient reversals, or loss of local contrast. The method is also able to significantly enhance ordinary images by bringing out detail in dark regions.

1,395 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Jun 1999
TL;DR: A simple algorithm is described that computes the radiometric response function of an imaging system, from images of an arbitrary scene taken using different exposures, to fuse the multiple images into a single high dynamic range radiance image.
Abstract: A simple algorithm is described that computes the radiometric response function of an imaging system, from images of an arbitrary scene taken using different exposures. The exposure is varied by changing either the aperture setting or the shutter speed. The algorithm does not require precise estimates of the exposures used. Rough estimates of the ratios of the exposures (e.g. F-number settings on an inexpensive lens) are sufficient for accurate recovery of the response function as well as the actual exposure ratios. The computed response function is used to fuse the multiple images into a single high dynamic range radiance image. Robustness is tested using a variety of scenes and cameras as well as noisy synthetic images generated using 100 randomly selected response curves. Automatic rejection of image areas that have large vignetting effects or temporal scene variations make the algorithm applicable to not just photographic but also video cameras.

807 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202127
202034
201937
201837
201749