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Historically black colleges and universities

About: Historically black colleges and universities is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1104 publications have been published within this topic receiving 17293 citations. The topic is also known as: HBCU.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the results of a quantitative study on the differences in the college experience between Black undergraduates who attended historically black colleges and universities and those who attended predominantly white colleges and Universities.
Abstract: Black students' participation in higher education has experienced periods of growth and decline. The recent resurgence and proliferation of racial incidents on college campuses, coupled with a floundering economy, signals a need to place this issue at the forefront of our educational agenda once again. In this article, Walter R. Allen presents the results of a quantitative study on the differences in the college experience between Black undergraduates who attended historically Black colleges and universities and those who attended predominantly White colleges and universities. Building on the results of a number of related studies and analyzing data from the National Study on Black College Students, Allen further examines the effects of key predictors on college outcomes among these two groups of students. He thus sets the stage for some provocative conclusions, with implications that extend beyond the boundaries of academia.

1,082 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Arum and Roksa as mentioned in this paper argue that students gain surprisingly little from their college experience, that there is "persistent and growing inequality" in the students' learning, and that "there is notable variation both within and across institutions" so far as "measurable differences in students' educational experiences" is concerned.
Abstract: Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa University of Chicago Press, 2011 This book has much to say that is perceptive about today's undergraduate higher education in the United States. It will be valuable to review the authors' insights. At the same time, it will be as instructive to note the book's weaknesses, and especially what is omitted from the discussion. It is a discussion that is truncated intellectually by the authors' close adherence to the selective awareness that so greatly typifies the mindscape of the contemporary American "establishment" in academia and throughout the commanding heights of American society. That mindscape allows a recognition of many things, but not of others. The authors are both faculty members at major American universities. Richard Arum is a sociology professor at New York University with a tie to the university's school of education. He is the author of several books on education and director of the Education Research Program sponsored by the Social Science Research Council. His co-author, Josipa Roksa, is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Virginia. That the book is published by the University of Chicago Press attests to its presumptive merit. Academically Adrift furnishes an example of something that has long been common in social science writing: a rather thin empirical study serving as the work's own contribution, combined with considerable additional material coming out of the literature on whatever subject is being explored. The function of the authors' own research is thus often to serve more or less as scientistic windowdressing. The reason we say the empiricism for this book is "thin" is that the "longitudinal data of 2,322 students," while seemingly ample, involves students spread over "a diverse range of campuses," including "liberal arts colleges and large research institutions, as well as a number of historically black colleges and universities and Hispanic-serving institutions," all "dispersed nationally across all four regions of the country." This must necessarily mean that the "sample" from any given institution or program was quite small. We are told that the authors didn't concern themselves with the appropriateness of each sample, but left the recruitment and retention of the sample's students to each of the respective institutions. The authors acknowledge that the study included fewer men than women, and more good students than those of "lower scholastic ability." So far as this book is concerned, however, the thinness doesn't particularly hurt the content, since so much of what is said doesn't especially depend upon anything unique found by the authors' own research. A brief summary is provided when the authors say that "we will highlight four core 'important lessons' from our research." These are that the institutions and students are "academically adrift" (which is the basis for the book's title), that students gain surprisingly little from their college experience, that there is "persistent and growing inequality" in the students' learning, and that "there is notable variation both within and across institutions" so far as "measurable differences in students' educational experiences" is concerned. Following the lead of former president Derek Bok of Harvard and of the Council for Aid to Education, the authors' ideal for higher education is that it will enhance students' "capacity for critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing." These are the three ingredients measured by the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), which the authors value most among the various assessment tools. The CLA results, they say, show that "growing numbers of students are sent to college at increasingly higher costs, but for a large proportion of them the gains in critical thinking, complex reasoning and written communication are either exceedingly small or empirically nonexistent. …

663 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the importance of the social and academic connections students make on campus, and examine their relationship to college grades and satisfaction with college, and highlight three prominent factors that may affect adjustment and subsequent success in college: minority status, socioeconomic disadvantage, and being a first generation college student.
Abstract: The enrollment of minority students in higher education has increased over the past 30 years, in both absolute terms and as a proportion of the student body. From 1976 to 2000, the number of Black students enrolled in degree-granting institutions rose 14.9%, while Hispanic enrollment increased by 25.4% (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2002, see Table 206). The vast majority of these students attend predominantly White institutions. According to figures from the Digest of Educational Statistics, only 15.9% of Black students in 2000 were enrolled in historically Black colleges and universities (NCES 2002, see Tables 206 and 222). As the number of Hispanic and Black students enrolling in higher education expands, so does the need to understand what constitutes a successful transition to college for these students. There are several reasons to suspect that acclimating to the new college environment may be different for these students than for their White and Asian counterparts. As will be shown later in this article, Black and Hispanic students are more likely to be first generation college students and to be from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds; in addition to these family background characteristics that may put them at a disadvantage, they may be subject to adjustment difficulties rooted in the experience of being a minority student on a predominantly White campus (Allen, 1992; Feagin, Vera, & Imani, 1996; Nora & Cabrera, 1996; Smedley, Meyers, & Harrell, 1993; Steele, 1997, 1998; Steele & Aronson, 1995, 1998). This article explores racial and ethnic differences in adjusting to college and the consequences different adjustment strategies have on college outcomes. Prior research has pinpointed the transition to college as a crucial period of time that, in many ways, sets the stage for later college success or failure (Gall, Evans, & Bellerose, 2000; Hurtado, Carter, & Spuler, 1996; Padilla, Trevino, Trevino, & Gonzalez, 1997; Terenzini, Rendon, Upcraft, Millar, Allison, Gregg, & Jalomo, 1994; Tinto, 1987). I begin by summarizing the major perspectives in education on the roots of college attrition. In the process of comparing and contrasting these perspectives, I highlight three prominent factors that may affect adjustment and subsequent success in college: minority status, socioeconomic disadvantage, and being a first generation college student. Looking at the social and academic connections students make on campus, I explore the importance of the college transition process. In the course of transitioning to college, students form various connections to others on campus. I introduce a variety of indicators of these social and academic connections and examine their relationship to college grades and satisfaction with college. I examine Black and Hispanic students separately to understand how their adjustment to college may be different from that of White and Asian students. Adjustment to College and Attrition As with any major life change, beginning college requires a process of adjustment. Models of college attrition vary in their consideration of the adjustment process, but for most, this is a crucial part of the college attrition puzzle. The model of student integration proposed by Tinto (1987) has been widely utilized (and critiqued) in the literature on higher education. (1) Tinto presents a longitudinal, predictive model of attrition that places integration into the academic and social systems of the institution at the center of the attrition process. Integration into the college environment is an emergent process that is largely a function of formal and informal interactions students have on campus, in both academic and social capacities. Through interactions in the social and academic realms, students either reaffirm or reevaluate their initial goals and commitments. Students who lack sufficient interaction with others on campus or have negative experiences may decide to depart the university as a result of this reevaluation. …

537 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A study of 11 African American men attending a public, urban HBCU, indicated that the university's rich supply of social capital makes it a unique fixture in the landscape of higher education, one whose special features have not been replicated by historically white institutions as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) were created to provide educational opportunities for African Americans when other higher education venues restricted their participation. HBCUs are credited with nurturing and producing leaders who embraced W. E. B. Du Bois's concept of the "Talented Tenth," and exhibiting fortitude in advancing social equality for all. Over the years, as legalized segregation was overturned and efforts were made to expand opportunities for African Americans, some have questioned the continuing need for HBCUs. A study of 11 African American men attending a public, urban HBCU, indicated that the university's rich supply of social capital (a direct consequence of its mission and history) makes it a unique fixture in the landscape of higher education, one whose special features have not been replicated by historically White institutions.

377 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The role of Black Fraternities in the African American Male Undergraduate Experience (Shaun R. Harper and Frank Harris III) is discussed in this article, along with the role of Spirituality and Religion in the Experiences of African American Men.
Abstract: Preface. Acknowledgments. The Authors. PART ONE: ISSUES AND IDEAS. 1 African American College Men Twenty-First-Century Issues and Concerns (Michael J. Cuyjet). 2 Enhancing the Academic Climate for African American Men (Fred A. Bonner II and Kevin W. Bailey). 3 The Impact of Campus Activities on African American College Men (Charles Brown). 4 Enhancing African American Male Student Outcomes Through Leadership and Active Involvement (Shaun R. Harper). 5 Developmental Mentoring of African American College Men (E. Michael Sutton). 6 The Role of Spirituality and Religion in the Experiences of African American Male College Students (Lemuel W. Watson). 7 The Role of Black Fraternities in the African American Male Undergraduate Experience (Shaun R. Harper and Frank Harris III). 8 African American Male College Athletes (Kenya LeNoir Messer). 9 African American Gay Men Another Challenge for the Academy (Jamie Washington and Vernon A. Wall). 10 African American Men at Historically Black Colleges and Universities Different Environments, Similar Challenges (Walter M. Kimbrough and Shaun R. Harper). 11 Meeting the Challenges to African American Men at Community Colleges (Myron L. Pope). 12 Helping African American Men Matriculate Ideas and Suggestions (Michael J. Cuyjet). PART TWO: PROFILES OF SOME SUCCESSFUL PROGRAMS. 13 Student African American Brotherhood (Tyrone Bledsoe and Kevin D. Rome, Sr.). 14 Meyerhoff Scholarship Program University of Maryland, Baltimore County (Earnestine Baker). 15 The Black Man on Campus (BMOC) Project Bowling Green State University, Ohio (Kevin W. Bailey). 16 Black Men's Collective Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (Christopher C. Catching). 17 Black Male Rap Session University of Louisville (Edward Laster). 18 African American Men of Arizona State University (AAMASU) (Alonzo Jones and Lasana O. Hotep). 19 Sons of Alkebulan and the Black Man Think Tank University of North Texas (Pamela Safisha Nzingha Hill). 20 It's Easier Than You Think Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio (Tobias Q. Brown and Amanda A. Farabee). 21 The Collegiate 100 An Affiliate Organization of the 100 Black Men of America, Inc. (Christian A. Mattingly and Carl Humphrey). Name Index. Subject Index.

281 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202357
2022131
202136
202047
201956
201851