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Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

About: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 9046 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 338151 citation(s).

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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/J.1600-0447.1983.TB09716.X
Abstract: A self-assessment scale has been developed and found to be a reliable instrument for detecting states of depression and anxiety in the setting of an hospital medical outpatient clinic. The anxiety and depressive subscales are also valid measures of severity of the emotional disorder. It is suggested that the introduction of the scales into general hospital practice would facilitate the large task of detection and management of emotional disorder in patients under investigation and treatment in medical and surgical departments.

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31,600 Citations


DatasetDOI: 10.1037/T03589-000
11 Feb 2013-
Abstract: A self-assessment scale has been developed and found to be a reliable instrument for detecting states of depression and anxiety in the setting of an hospital medical outpatient clinic. The anxiety and depressive subscales are also valid measures of severity of the emotional disorder. It is suggested that the introduction of the scales into general hospital practice would facilitate the large task of detection and management of emotional disorder in patients under investigation and treatment in medical and surgical departments.

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7,504 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0022-3999(01)00296-3
Abstract: Objective: To review the literature of the validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Method: A review of the 747 identified papers that used HADS was performed to address the following questions: (I) How are the factor structure, discriminant validity and the internal consistency of HADS? (II) How does HADS perform as a case finder for anxiety disorders and depression? (III) How does HADS agree with other self-rating instruments used to rate anxiety and depression? Results: Most factor analyses demonstrated a twofactor solution in good accordance with the HADS subscales for Anxiety (HADS-A) and Depression (HADS-D), respectively. The correlations between the two subscales varied from .40 to .74 (mean .56). Cronbach’s alpha for HADS-A varied from .68 to .93 (mean .83) and for HADS-D from .67 to .90 (mean .82). In most studies an optimal balance between sensitivity and specificity was achieved when caseness was defined by a score of 8 or above on both HADS-A and HADS-D. The sensitivity and specificity for both HADS-A and HADS-D of approximately 0.80 were very similar to the sensitivity and specificity achieved by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Correlations between HADS and other commonly used questionnaires were in the range .49 to .83. Conclusions: HADS was found to perform well in assessing the symptom severity and caseness of anxiety disorders and depression in both somatic, psychiatric and primary care patients and in the general population. D 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

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Topics: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (65%), Anxiety (54%), Discriminant validity (52%) ...read more

7,454 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0022-3999(96)00216-4
C. Herrmann1Institutions (1)
Abstract: More than 200 published studies from most medical settings worldwide have reported experiences with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) which was specifically developed by Zigmond and Snaith for use with physically ill patients. Although introduced in 1983, there is still no comprehensive documentation of its psychometric properties. The present review summarizes available data on reliability and validity and gives an overview of clinical studies conducted with this instrument and their most important findings. The HADS gives clinically meaningful results as a psychological screening tool, in clinical group comparisons and in correlational studies with several aspects of disease and quality of life. It is sensitive to changes both during the course of diseases and in response to psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological intervention. Finally, HADS scores predict psychosocial and possibly also physical outcome.

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Topics: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (67%), Anxiety (52%), Psychosocial (51%) ...read more

2,646 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1017/S0033291796004382
Abstract: Background. Research on the dimensional structure and reliability of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and its relationship with age is scarce. Moreover, its ecacy in determining the presence of depression in dierent patient groups has been questioned. Methods. Psychometric properties of the HADS were assessed in six dierent groups of Dutch subjects (N fl 6165): (1) a random sample of younger adults (age 18‐65 years) (N fl 199); (2) a random sample of elderly subjects of 57 to 65 years of age (N fl 1901); (3) a random sample of elderly subjects of 66 years or older (N fl 3293); (4) a sample of consecutive general practice patients (N fl 112); (5) a sample of consecutive general medical out-patients with unexplained somatic symptoms (N fl 169); and (6) a sample of consecutive psychiatric out-patients (N fl 491). Results. Evidence for a two-factor solution corresponding to the original two subscales of the HADS was found, although anxiety and depression subscales were strongly correlated. Homogeneity and test‐retest reliability of the total scale and the subscales were good. The dimensional structure and reliability of the HADS was stable across medical settings and age groups. The correlations between HADS scores and age were small. The total HADS scale showed a better balance between sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) in identifying cases of psychiatric disorder as defined by the Present State Examination than the depression subscale in identifying cases of unipolar depression as defined by ICD-8. Conclusions. The moderate PPV suggests that the HADS is best used as a screening questionnaire and not as a ‘case-identifier’ for psychiatric disorder or depression.

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1,798 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20227
2021908
2020746
2019628
2018568
2017658

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Jennifer S. Temel

34 papers, 1.2K citations

Jennie Ponsford

29 papers, 2.4K citations

Peyman Adibi

27 papers, 359 citations

Hamid Afshar

23 papers, 303 citations

Areej El-Jawahri

21 papers, 788 citations

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