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Ignition system

About: Ignition system is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 58356 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 554185 citation(s). The topic is also known as: ignition unit.
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Journal ArticleDOI
David B. Kittelson1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Most of the particle number emitted by engines is in the nanoparticle range, Dp 50 nm p nm, range. Nanoparticles are typically hydrocarbons or sulfate and form by nucleation during dilution and cooling of the exhaust, while accumulation mode particles are mainly carbonaceous soot agglomerates formed directly by combustion. Emission standards on diesel engines have led to dramatic reductions in particle mass emitted. However, a new HEI study shows that some low-emission diesel engines emit much higher concentrations of nanoparticles than older designs and other low-emission designs. Many recent studies suggest that at similar mass concentrations; nanometer size particles are more dangerous than micron size particles. This has raised questions about whether nanoparticle (number based) emission standards should be imposed. Unlike mass, number is not conserved. It may change dramatically by nucleation and coagulation during dilution and sampling, making it very difficult to design a standard. Furthermore, if nanoparticles are a problem, spark ignition engines may also have to be controlled.

2,143 citations


Book
29 Dec 1998-
Abstract: Machine generated contents note: About the AuthorPreface to the Second EditionPreface to the Third EditionList of Symbols and Abbreviations1 Fire science and combustion 1.1 Fuels and the Combustion Process 1.2 The Physical Chemistry of Combustion in Fires Problems2 Heat transfer 2.1 Summary of the heat transfer equations 2.2 Conduction 2.3 Convection 2.4 Radiation Problems3 Limits of flammability and premixed flames 3.1 Limits of flammability 3.2 The structure of a premixed flame 3.3 Heat losses from premixed flames 3.4 Measurement of burning velocities 3.5 Variation of burning velocity with experimental parameters 3.6 The effect of turbulence Problems4 Diffusion flames and fire plumes 4.1 Laminar jet flames 4.2 Turbulent jet flames 4.3 Flames from natural fires 4.4 Some practical applications Problems5 Steady burning of liquids and solids 5.1 Burning of liquids 5.2 Burning of solids Problems6 Ignition: The initiation of flaming combustion 6.1 Ignition of^

1,962 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of n-heptane in flow reactors, shock tubes, and rapid compression machines. Over the series of experiments numerically investigated, the initial pressure ranged from 1–42 atm, the temperature from 550–1700 K, the equivalence ratio from 0.3–1.5, and nitrogen-argon dilution from 70–99%. The combination of ignition delay time and species composition data provide for a stringent test of the chemical kinetic mechanism. The reactions are classed into various types, and the reaction rate constants are given together with an explanation of how the rate constants were obtained. Experimental results from the literature of ignition behind reflected shock waves and in a rapid compression machine were used to develop and validate the reaction mechanism at both low and high temperatures. Additionally, species composition data from a variable pressure flow reactor and a jet-stirred reactor were used to help complement and refine the low-temperature portions of the reaction mechanism. A sensitivity analysis was performed for each of the combustion environments. This analysis showed that the low-temperature chemistry is very sensitive to the formation of stable olefin species from hydroperoxy-alkyl radicals and to the chain-branching steps involving ketohydroperoxide molecules.

1,739 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
20 Jan 2004-Physics of Plasmas
Abstract: The 1990 National Academy of Science final report of its review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the 10-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the highest-priority prerequisite for proceeding with construction of an ignition-scale laser facility, now called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These objectives were chosen to demonstrate that there was sufficient understanding of the physics of ignition targets that the laser requirements for laboratory ignition could be accurately specified. This research on Nova, as well as additional research on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, is the subject of this review. The objectives of the U.S. indirect-drive target physics program have been to experimentally demonstrate and predictively model hohlraum characteristics, as well as capsule performance in targets that have been scaled in key physics variables from NIF targets. To address the hohlrau...

1,455 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of iso-octane in a jet-stirred reactor, flow reactors, shock tubes and in a motored engine. Over the series of experiments investigated, the initial pressure ranged from 1 to 45 atm, the temperature from 550 K to 1700 K, the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 1.5, with nitrogen-argon dilution from 70% to 99%. This range of physical conditions, together with the measurements of ignition delay time and concentrations, provide a broad-ranging test of the chemical kinetic mechanism. This mechanism was based on our previous modeling of alkane combustion and, in particular, on our study of the oxidation of n-heptane. Experimental results of ignition behind reflected shock waves were used to develop and validate the predictive capability of the reaction mechanism at both low and high temperatures. Moreover, species’ concentrations from flow reactors and a jet-stirred reactor were used to help complement and refine the low and intermediate temperature portions of the reaction mechanism, leading to good predictions of intermediate products in most cases. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed for each of the combustion environments in an attempt to identify the most important reactions under the relevant conditions of study. © 2002 by The Combustion Institute

1,204 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
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Heat transfer

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Reynolds number

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202273
20211,440
20201,739
20192,152
20181,972
20172,206

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Pavel A. Strizhak

127 papers, 1.5K citations

Rolf D. Reitz

89 papers, 6.2K citations

Geniy V. Kuznetsov

80 papers, 837 citations

Xingcai Lu

59 papers, 1.6K citations

Bengt Johansson

57 papers, 1.7K citations