scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Information seeking behavior

About: Information seeking behavior is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1866 publications have been published within this topic receiving 42132 citations. The topic is also known as: information seeking behaviour.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A system of reinforcing gussets or strips is provided for strengthening a burial vault liner against flexure under the load presented by flowable cementitious vault forming material.
Abstract: First, a new model of searching in online and other information systems, called ‘berrypicking’, is discussed. This model, it is argued, is much closer to the real behavior of information searchers than the traditional model of information retrieval is, and, consequently, will guide our thinking better in the design of effective interfaces. Second, the research literature of manual information seeking behavior is drawn on for suggestions of capabilities that users might like to have in online systems. Third, based on the new model and the research on information seeking, suggestions are made for how new search capabilities could be incorporated into the design of search interfaces. Particular attention is given to the nature and types of browsing that can be facilitated.

1,703 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive theoretical model that integrates psychological/motivational, economics, and processing approaches into a cohesive whole for understanding tourists' information seeking behavior was developed, and the model proposed that for immediate pre-purchase information needs, a consumer is likely to utilize either internal or external sources, or both.

626 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Research in information-seeking behavior, motivation, critical thinking, and learning theory was explored and compared in a search for possible motivating factors behind students' dependence on television and the Internet for their information needs.

488 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults and females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information.
Abstract: Background: Baby boomers and older adults, a subset of the population at high risk for chronic disease, social isolation, and poor health outcomes, are increasingly utilizing the Internet and social media (Web 2.0) to locate and evaluate health information. However, among these older populations, little is known about what factors influence their eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information. Objective: The intent of the study was to explore the extent to which sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use influences eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information among baby boomers and older adults. Methods: A random sample of baby boomers and older adults (n=283, mean 67.46 years, SD 9.98) participated in a cross-sectional, telephone survey that included the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) and items from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) assessing electronic device use and use of Web 2.0 for health information. An independent samples t test compared eHealth literacy among users and non-users of Web 2.0 for health information. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use on self-reported eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for seeking and sharing health information. Results: Almost 90% of older Web 2.0 users (90/101, 89.1%) reported using popular Web 2.0 websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to find and share health information. Respondents reporting use of Web 2.0 reported greater eHealth literacy (mean 30.38, SD 5.45, n=101) than those who did not use Web 2.0 (mean 28.31, SD 5.79, n=182), t 217.60 =−2.98, P =.003. Younger age ( b =−0.10), more education ( b =0.48), and use of more electronic devices ( b =1.26) were significantly associated with greater eHealth literacy ( R 2 =.17, R 2 adj =.14, F 9,229 =5.277, P <.001). Women were nearly three times more likely than men to use Web 2.0 for health information (OR 2.63, Wald= 8.09, df=1, P =.004). Finally, more education predicted greater use of Web 2.0 for health information, with college graduates (OR 2.57, Wald= 3.86, df =1, P =.049) and post graduates (OR 7.105, Wald= 4.278, df=1, P =.04) nearly 2 to 7 times more likely than non-high school graduates to use Web 2.0 for health information. Conclusions: Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults. Females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information. More in-depth surveys and interviews among more diverse groups of baby boomers and older adult populations will likely yield a better understanding regarding how current Web-based health information seeking and sharing behaviors influence health-related decision making. [J Med Internet Res 2015;17(3):e70]

484 citations

01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this paper, an article de synthese examinant les divers elements des etudes d'utilisateurs and tentant de les integrer a un modele general de comportement de recherche d'information.
Abstract: Article de synthese examinant les divers elements des etudes d'utilisateurs et tentant de les integrer a un modele general de comportement de recherche d'information. Bibliographie importante d'articles et de rapports sur le sujet

480 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Qualitative research
39.9K papers, 2.3M citations
78% related
Information system
107.5K papers, 1.8M citations
76% related
Coping (psychology)
48.1K papers, 1.6M citations
75% related
Social support
50.8K papers, 1.9M citations
74% related
Psychological intervention
82.6K papers, 2.6M citations
73% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202330
202258
202179
2020112
201992
2018116