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Topic

Information system

About: Information system is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 107588 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 1858382 citation(s). The topic is also known as: IS & information management system.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The objective is to describe the performance of design-science research in Information Systems via a concise conceptual framework and clear guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating the research.
Abstract: Two paradigms characterize much of the research in the Information Systems discipline: behavioral science and design science The behavioral-science paradigm seeks to develop and verify theories that explain or predict human or organizational behavior The design-science paradigm seeks to extend the boundaries of human and organizational capabilities by creating new and innovative artifacts Both paradigms are foundational to the IS discipline, positioned as it is at the confluence of people, organizations, and technology Our objective is to describe the performance of design-science research in Information Systems via a concise conceptual framework and clear guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating the research In the design-science paradigm, knowledge and understanding of a problem domain and its solution are achieved in the building and application of the designed artifact Three recent exemplars in the research literature are used to demonstrate the application of these guidelines We conclude with an analysis of the challenges of performing high-quality design-science research in the context of the broader IS community

9,556 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
William H. DeLone1, Ephraim R. McLean2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: A large number of studies have been conducted during the last decade and a half attempting to identify those factors that contribute to information systems success, but the dependent variable in these studies-I/S success-has been an elusive one to define.
Abstract: A large number of studies have been conducted during the last decade and a half attempting to identify those factors that contribute to information systems success. However, the dependent variable in these studies-I/S success-has been an elusive one to define. Different researchers have addressed different aspects of success, making comparisons difficult and the prospect of building a cumulative tradition for I/S research similarly elusive. To organize this diverse research, as well as to present a more integrated view of the concept of I/S success, a comprehensive taxonomy is introduced. This taxonomy posits six major dimensions or categories of I/S success-SYSTEM QUALITY, INFORMATION QUALITY, USE, USER SATISFACTION, INDIVIDUAL IMPACT, and ORGANIZATIONAL IMPACT. Using these dimensions, both conceptual and empirical studies are then reviewed a total of 180 articles are cited and organized according to the dimensions of the taxonomy. Finally, the many aspects of I/S success are drawn together into a descriptive model and its implications for future I/S research are discussed.

9,454 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Richard L. Daft1, Robert H. Lengel2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: Models are proposed that show how organizations can be designed to meet the information needs of technology, interdepartmental relations, and the environment to both reduce uncertainty and resolve equivocality.
Abstract: This paper answers the question, "Why do organizations process information?" Uncertainty and equivocality are defined as two forces that influence information processing in organizations. Organization structure and internal systems determine both the amount and richness of information provided to managers. Models are proposed that show how organizations can be designed to meet the information needs of technology, interdepartmental relations, and the environment. One implication for managers is that a major problem is lack of clarity, not lack of data. The models indicate how organizations can be designed to provide information mechanisms to both reduce uncertainty and resolve equivocality.

8,154 citations


Book ChapterDOI
11 Jun 1996
TL;DR: This chapter describes the System Usability Scale (SUS) a reliable, low-cost usability scale that can be used for global assessments of systems usability.
Abstract: Usability is not a quality that exists in any real or absolute sense. Perhaps it can be best summed up as being a general quality of the appropriateness to a purpose of any particular artefact. This notion is neatly summed up by Terry Pratchett in his novel Moving Pictures:In just the same way, the usability of any tool or system has to be viewed in terms of the context in which it is used, and its appropriateness to that context. With particular reference to information systems, this view of usability is reflected in the current draft international standard ISO 9241-11 and in the European Community ESPRIT project MUSiC (Measuring Usability of Systems in Context) (e.g. Bevan et al., 1991). In general, it is impossible to specify the usability of a system (i.e. its fitness for purpose) without first defining who are the intended users of the system, the tasks those users will perform with it, and the characteristics of the physical, organizational and social environment in which it will be used.

7,387 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Heinz K. Klein1, Michael D. MyersInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: A set of principles for the conduct and evaluation of interpretive field research in information systems is proposed, along with their philosophical rationale, and the usefulness of the principles is illustrated by evaluating three publishedinterpretive field studies drawn from the IS research literature.
Abstract: This article discusses the conduct and evaluatoin of interpretive research in information systems. While the conventions for evaluating information systems case studies conducted according to the natural science model of social science are now widely accepted, this is not the case for interpretive field studies. A set of principles for the conduct and evaluation of interpretive field research in information systems is proposed, along with their philosophical rationale. The usefulness of the principles is illustrated by evaluating three published interpretive field studies drawn from the IS research literature. The intention of the paper is to further reflect and debate on the important subject of grounding interpretive research methodology.

5,380 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202255
20212,265
20203,209
20193,451
20183,453
20173,445