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Infragravity wave

About: Infragravity wave is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 2108 publications have been published within this topic receiving 63967 citations.


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TL;DR: In this article, a review of gravity wave sources and characteristics, the evolution of the gravity wave spectrum with altitude and with variations of wind and stability, the character and implications of observed climatologies, and the wave interaction and instability processes that constrain wave amplitudes and spectral shape are discussed.
Abstract: [1] Atmospheric gravity waves have been a subject of intense research activity in recent years because of their myriad effects and their major contributions to atmospheric circulation, structure, and variability. Apart from occasionally strong lower-atmospheric effects, the major wave influences occur in the middle atmosphere, between ∼ 10 and 110 km altitudes because of decreasing density and increasing wave amplitudes with altitude. Theoretical, numerical, and observational studies have advanced our understanding of gravity waves on many fronts since the review by Fritts [1984a]; the present review will focus on these more recent contributions. Progress includes a better appreciation of gravity wave sources and characteristics, the evolution of the gravity wave spectrum with altitude and with variations of wind and stability, the character and implications of observed climatologies, and the wave interaction and instability processes that constrain wave amplitudes and spectral shape. Recent studies have also expanded dramatically our understanding of gravity wave influences on the large-scale circulation and the thermal and constituent structures of the middle atmosphere. These advances have led to a number of parameterizations of gravity wave effects which are enabling ever more realistic descriptions of gravity wave forcing in large-scale models. There remain, nevertheless, a number of areas in which further progress is needed in refining our understanding of and our ability to describe and predict gravity wave influences in the middle atmosphere. Our view of these unknowns and needs is also offered.

2,206 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of mean winds and gravity waves on the mean momentum budget were investigated and it was shown that the existence of critical levels in the mesosphere significantly limits the ability of gravity waves to generate turbulence.
Abstract: It has been suggested (Lindzen, 1967, 1968a, b; Lindzen and Blake, 1971; Hodges, 1969) that turbulence in the upper mesosphere arises from the unstable breakdown of tides and gravity waves. Crudely speaking, it was expected that sufficient turbulence would be generated to prevent the growth of wave amplitude with height (roughly as (basic pressure)−1/2). This work has been extended to allow for the generation of turbulence by smaller amplitude waves, the effects of mean winds on the waves, and the effects of the waves on the mean momentum budget. The effects of mean winds, while of relatively small importance for tides, are crucial for internal gravity waves originating in the troposphere. Winds in the troposphere and stratosphere sharply limit the phase speeds of waves capable of reaching the upper mesosphere. In addition, the existence of critical levels in the mesosphere significantly limits the ability of gravity waves to generate turbulence, while the breakdown of gravity waves contributes to the development of critical levels. The results of the present study suggest that at middle latitudes in winter, eddy coefficients may peak at relatively low altitudes (50 km) and at higher altitudes in summer and during sudden warmings (70–80 km), and decrease with height rather sharply above these levels. Rocket observations are used to estimate momentum deposition by gravity waves. Accelerations of about 100 m/s/day are suggested. Such accelerations are entirely capable of producing the warm winter and cold summer mesopauses.

1,967 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The radiation stresses in water waves play an important role in a variety of oceanographic phenomena, for example in the change in mean sea level due to storm waves (wave set-up), the generation of "surf-beats", the interaction of waves with steady currents, and the steepening of short gravity waves on the crests of longer waves as discussed by the authors.

1,567 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the second-order currents and changes in mean surface level which are caused by gravity waves of non-uniform amplitude are investigated, and the effects are interpreted in terms of the radiation stresses in the waves.
Abstract: This paper studies the second-order currents and changes in mean surface level which are caused by gravity waves of non-uniform amplitude. The effects are interpreted in terms of the radiation stresses in the waves.The first example is of wave groups propagated in water of uniform mean depth. The problem is solved first by a perturbation analysis. In two special cases the second-order currents are found to be proportional simply to the square of the local wave amplitude: (a) when the lengths of the groups are large compared to the mean depth, and (b) when the groups are all of equal length. Then the surface is found to be depressed under a high group of waves and the mass-transport is relatively negative there. In case (a) the result can be simply related to the radiation stresses, which tend to expel fluid from beneath the higher waves.The second example considered is the propagation of waves of steady amplitude in water of gradually varying depth. Assuming no loss of energy by friction or reflexion, the wave amplitude must vary horizontally, to maintain the flux of energy constant; it is shown that this produces a negative tilt in the mean surface level as the depth diminishes. However, if the wave height is limited by breaking, the tilt is positive. The results are in agreement with some observations by Fairchild.Lastly, the propagation of groups of waves from deep to shallow water is studied. As the mean depth decreases, so the response of the fluid to the radiation stresses tends to increase. The long waves thus generated may be reflected as free waves, and so account for the 'surf beats’ observed by Munk and Tucker.Generalle speaking, the changes in mean sea level produced by ocean waves are comparable with those due to horizontal wind stress. It may be necessary to allow for the wave stresses in calculating wind stress coefficients.

959 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effect of wind-generated gravity waves on the airflow is discussed using quasi-linear theory of wind wave generation, and a sensitive dependence of the aerodynamic drag on wave age is found, explaining the scatter in plots of the experimentally observed drag as a function of the wind speed at 10m height.
Abstract: The effect of wind-generated gravity waves on the airflow is discussed using quasi-linear theory of wind-wave generation. In this theory, both the effects of the waves and the effect of air turbulence on the mean wave profile are taken into account. The main result of this theory is that for young wind sea most of the stress in the boundary layer is determined by momentum transfer from wind to waves, therefore, resulting in a strong interaction between wind and waves. For old wind sea there is, however, hardly any coupling. As a consequence, a sensitive dependence of the aerodynamic drag on wave age is found, explaining the scatter in plots of the experimentally observed drag as a function of the wind speed at 10-m height. Also, the growth rate of waves by wind is found to depend on wave age. All this suggests that a proper description of the physics of the momentum transfer at the air–sea interface can only be given by coupling an atmospheric (boundary-layer) model with an ocean-wave prediction ...

858 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202313
202228
202128
202037
201933
201829