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Intervention AUV

About: Intervention AUV is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 980 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 14130 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
Junku Yuh1
TL;DR: This paper surveys some key areas in current state-of-the-art underwater robotic technologies, by no means a complete survey but provides key references for future development.
Abstract: During the 1990s, numerous worldwide research and development activities have occurred in underwater robotics, especially in the area of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). As the ocean attracts great attention on environmental issues and resources as well as scientific and military tasks, the need for and use of underwater robotic systems has become more apparent. Great efforts have been made in developing AUVs to overcome challenging scientific and engineering problems caused by the unstructured and hazardous ocean environment. In the 1990s, about 30 new AUVs have been built worldwide. With the development of new materials, advanced computing and sensory technology, as well as theoretical advancements, R&D activities in the AUV community have increased. However, this is just the beginning for more advanced, yet practical and reliable AUVs. This paper surveys some key areas in current state-of-the-art underwater robotic technologies. It is by no means a complete survey but provides key references for future development. The new millennium will bring advancements in technology that will enable the development of more practical, reliable AUVs.

582 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The emergence of biorobotic autonomous undersea vehicle (AUV) as a focus for discipline-integrated research in the context of underwater propulsion and maneuvering is considered within the confines of the Biorobotics Program in the Office of Naval Research. The significant advances in three disciplines, namely the biology-inspired high-lift unsteady hydrodynamics, artificial muscle technology and neuroscience-based control, are discussed in an effort to integrate them into viable products. The understanding of the mechanisms of delayed stall, molecular design of artificial muscles and the neural approaches to the actuation of control surfaces is reviewed in the context of devices based on the pectoral fins of fish, while remaining focused on their integrated implementation in biorobotic AUVs. A mechanistic understanding of the balance between cruising and maneuvering in swimming animals and undersea vehicles is given. All aquatic platforms, in both nature and engineering, except during short duration burst speeds that are observed in a few species, appear to lie within the condition where their natural period of oscillation equals the time taken by them to travel the distance of their own lengths. Progress in the development of small underwater experimental biorobotic vehicles is considered where the three aforementioned disciplines are integrated into one novel maneuvering device or propulsor. The potential in maneuvering and silencing is discussed.

374 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One of the first trials of autonomous intervention performed by SAUVIM in the oceanic environment is described, which consists in a sequence of autonomous tasks finalized to search for the target and to securely hook a cable to it in order to bring the target to the surface.
Abstract: Many underwater intervention tasks are today performed using manned submersibles or remotely operated vehicles in teleoperation mode. Autonomous underwater vehicles are mostly employed in survey applications. In fact, the low bandwidth and significant time delay inherent in acoustic subsea communications represent a considerable obstacle to remotely operate a manipulation system, making it impossible for remote controllers to react to problems in a timely manner. Nevertheless, vehicles with no physical link and with no human occupants permit intervention in dangerous areas, such as in deep ocean, under ice, in missions to retrieve hazardous objects, or in classified areas. The key element in underwater intervention performed with autonomous vehicles is autonomous manipulation. This is a challenging technology milestone, which refers to the capability of a robot system that performs intervention tasks requiring physical contacts with unstructured environments without continuous human supervision. Today, only few AUVs are equipped with manipulators. SAUVIM (Semi Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Intervention Mission, University of Hawaii) is one of the first underwater vehicle capable of autonomous manipulation. This paper presents the solutions chosen within the development of the system in order to address the problems intrinsic to autonomous underwater manipulation. In the proposed approach, the most noticeable aspect is the increase in the level of information transferred between the system and the human supervisor. We describe one of the first trials of autonomous intervention performed by SAUVIM in the oceanic environment. To the best knowledge of the authors, no sea trials in underwater autonomous manipulation have been presented in the literature. The presented operation is an underwater recovery mission, which consists in a sequence of autonomous tasks finalized to search for the target and to securely hook a cable to it in order to bring the target to the surface.

258 citations

Book ChapterDOI
28 Nov 2002
Abstract: A class of small (50 kg, 2 m length), reusable autonomous underwater vehicles capable of operating at speeds cm/s with ranges several thousand kilometers and durations of months has been developed and tested. The vehicles, autonomous profiling floats with wings, execute sawtooth patterns between the surface, where they are located and com to shore, and depths of O(1000 m). These vehicles are commanded remotely and report results to shore in near real tim ent approaches to the various design issues are embodied in the vehicles Spray, Seaglider and Slocum models desc including batteryand thermal-powered propulsion, different depth and speed capabilities, diverse hydrodynamic appro reducing drag and gliding control, various communication schemes, and a range of sensors. These approaches are des examples of completed scientific missions are given. l., e st els. h ic es rs s, ing ult g, em cg on the ive is cles an be an eing ean urand the lidin

237 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
24 Apr 2000
TL;DR: A survey of the present state and future directions of commercial underwater robotics, examines principal technical challenges, and outlines new enabling technologies for commercial underwater robotic vehicles.
Abstract: The development of two new classes of commercial underwater robotic vehicles-deep diving work-class remotely operated vehicles and survey-class autonomous vehicles-is being driven by the needs of deep water oil production and deep ocean telecommunication cable operations. The paper presents a survey of the present state and future directions of commercial underwater robotics, examines principal technical challenges, and outlines new enabling technologies for commercial underwater robotic vehicles.

218 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20201
20192
20183
201732
201682