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Ischemic cardiomyopathy

About: Ischemic cardiomyopathy is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 3755 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 104738 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1982-Circulation
TL;DR: If prolonged, chronic postischemic left ventricular dysfunction can progress to myocardial scarring and ischemic cardiomyopathy, it may be important to determine how often it can be ameliorated by permanent improvement of myocardia perfusion by surgical treatment.
Abstract: Myocardial ischemia has, for many decades, been viewed as an all-or-none process that causes myocardial necrosis when prolonged and severe, but whose effects are transient when it is brief or mild. In view of the evidence that the ischemic process may "hit, run and stun," perhaps our thinking about the consequences of myocardial ischemia should be expanded. According to this formulation, an ischemic insult not of sufficient severity of duration to produce myocardial necrosis may acutely affect myocardial repolarization and cause angina (hit); but these changes wane rapidly (run), when the balance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand has been reestablished. However, the ischemia may interfere with normal myocardial function, biochemical processes and ultrastructure for prolonged periods (stun). The severity and duration of these postischemic changes depend on the length and intensity of the ischemia, as well as on the condition of the myocardium at the onset of the ischemic episode. Furthermore, it is likely that when the myocardium is repeatedly stunned, it may exhibit chronic postischemic left ventricular dysfunction, an ill-defined condition. If prolonged, chronic postischemic left ventricular dysfunction can progress to myocardial scarring and ischemic cardiomyopathy, it may be important to determine how often it can be ameliorated by permanent improvement of myocardial perfusion by surgical treatment.

2,787 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Madit-Crt Trial Investigators1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: CRT combined with ICD decreased the risk of heart-failure events in relatively asymptomatic patients with a low ejection fraction and wide QRS complex and was associated with a significant reduction in left ventricular volumes and improvement in the ejectedion fraction.
Abstract: During a 4.5-year period, we enrolled and followed 1820 patients with ischemic or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, an ejection fraction of 30% or less, a QRS duration of 130 msec or more, and New York Heart Association class I or II symptoms. Patients were randomly assigned in a 3:2 ratio to receive CRT plus an implantable cardioverter– defibrillator (ICD) (1089 patients) or an ICD alone (731 patients). The primary end point was death from any cause or a nonfatal heart-failure event (whichever came first). Heartfailure events were diagnosed by physicians who were aware of the treatment assignments, but they were adjudicated by a committee that was unaware of assignments. Results During an average follow-up of 2.4 years, the primary end point occurred in 187 of 1089 patients in the CRT–ICD group (17.2%) and 185 of 731 patients in the ICD-only group (25.3%) (hazard ratio in the CRT–ICD group, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 0.84; P = 0.001). The benefit did not differ significantly between patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and those with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. The superiority of CRT was driven by a 41% reduction in the risk of heart-failure events, a finding that was evident primarily in a prespecified subgroup of patients with a QRS duration of 150 msec or more. CRT was associated with a significant reduction in left ventricular volumes and improvement in the ejection fraction. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the overall risk of death, with a 3% annual mortality rate in each treatment group. Serious adverse events were infrequent in the two groups. Conclusions CRT combined with ICD decreased the risk of heart-failure events in relatively asymptomatic patients with a low ejection fraction and wide QRS complex. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00180271.)

2,376 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Loss of myocytes due to apoptosis occurs in patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy and may contribute to progressive myocardial dysfunction.
Abstract: Background Heart failure can result from a variety of causes, including ischemic, hypertensive, toxic, and inflammatory heart disease. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the progressive deterioration of myocardial function observed in heart failure remain unclear and may result from apoptosis (programmed cell death). Methods We examined seven explanted hearts obtained during cardiac transplantation for evidence of apoptosis. All seven patients had severe chronic heart failure: four had idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, and three had ischemic cardiomyopathy. DNA fragmentation (an indicator of apoptosis) was identified histochemically by in situ end-labeling as well as by agarose-gel electrophoresis of end-labeled DNA. Myocardial tissues obtained from four patients who had had a myocardial infarction one to two days previously were used as positive controls, and heart tissues obtained from four persons who died in motor vehicle accidents were used as negative controls for the end-labeling stu...

1,390 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Roberto Bolli1, Atul R. Chugh1, Domenico D'Amario2, John H Loughran1  +16 moreInstitutions (2)
26 Nov 2011-The Lancet
TL;DR: It is suggested that intracoronary infusion of autologous CSCs is effective in improving LV systolic function and reducing infarct size in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction, and warrant further, larger, phase 2 studies.
Abstract: Summary Background c-kit-positive, lineage-negative cardiac stem cells (CSCs) improve post-infarction left ventricular (LV) dysfunction when administered to animals. We undertook a phase 1 trial (Stem Cell Infusion in Patients with Ischemic cardiOmyopathy [SCIPIO]) of autologous CSCs for the treatment of heart failure resulting from ischaemic heart disease. Methods In stage A of the SCIPIO trial, patients with post-infarction LV dysfunction (ejection fraction [EF] ≤40%) before coronary artery bypass grafting were consecutively enrolled in the treatment and control groups. In stage B, patients were randomly assigned to the treatment or control group in a 2:3 ratio by use of a computer-generated block randomisation scheme. 1 million autologous CSCs were administered by intracoronary infusion at a mean of 113 days (SE 4) after surgery; controls were not given any treatment. Although the study was open label, the echocardiographic analyses were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was short-term safety of CSCs and the secondary endpoint was efficacy. A per-protocol analysis was used. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00474461. Findings This study is still in progress. 16 patients were assigned to the treatment group and seven to the control group; no CSC-related adverse effects were reported. In 14 CSC-treated patients who were analysed, LVEF increased from 30·3% (SE 1·9) before CSC infusion to 38·5% (2·8) at 4 months after infusion (p=0·001). By contrast, in seven control patients, during the corresponding time interval, LVEF did not change (30·1% [2·4] at 4 months after CABG vs 30·2% [2·5] at 8 months after CABG). Importantly, the salubrious effects of CSCs were even more pronounced at 1 year in eight patients (eg, LVEF increased by 12·3 ejection fraction units [2·1] vs baseline, p=0·0007). In the seven treated patients in whom cardiac MRI could be done, infarct size decreased from 32·6 g (6·3) by 7·8 g (1·7; 24%) at 4 months (p=0·004) and 9·8 g (3·5; 30%) at 1 year (p=0·04). Interpretation These initial results in patients are very encouraging. They suggest that intracoronary infusion of autologous CSCs is effective in improving LV systolic function and reducing infarct size in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction, and warrant further, larger, phase 2 studies. Funding University of Louisville Research Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

1,286 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
12 Dec 2012-JAMA
TL;DR: In this early-stage study of patients with ICM, transendocardial injection of allogeneic and autologous MSCs without a placebo control were both associated with low rates of treatment-emergent SAEs, including immunologic reactions.
Abstract: Context Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are under evaluation as a therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Both autologous and allogeneic MSC therapies are possible; however, their safety and efficacy have not been compared. Objective To test whether allogeneic MSCs are as safe and effective as autologous MSCs in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction due to ICM. Design, Setting, and Patients A phase 1/2 randomized comparison (POSEIDON study) in a US tertiary-care referral hospital of allogeneic and autologous MSCs in 30 patients with LV dysfunction due to ICM between April 2, 2010, and September 14, 2011, with 13-month follow-up. Intervention Twenty million, 100 million, or 200 million cells (5 patients in each cell type per dose level) were delivered by transendocardial stem cell injection into 10 LV sites. Main Outcome Measures Thirty-day postcatheterization incidence of predefined treatment-emergent serious adverse events (SAEs). Efficacy assessments included 6-minute walk test, exercise peak VO 2 , Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), New York Heart Association class, LV volumes, ejection fraction (EF), early enhancement defect (EED; infarct size), and sphericity index. Results Within 30 days, 1 patient in each group (treatment-emergent SAE rate, 6.7%) was hospitalized for heart failure, less than the prespecified stopping event rate of 25%. The 1-year incidence of SAEs was 33.3% (n = 5) in the allogeneic group and 53.3% (n = 8) in the autologous group (P = .46). At 1 year, there were no ventricular arrhythmia SAEs observed among allogeneic recipients compared with 4 patients (26.7%) in the autologous group (P = .10). Relative to baseline, autologous but not allogeneic MSC therapy was associated with an improvement in the 6-minute walk test and the MLHFQ score, but neither improved exercise VO 2 max. Allogeneic and autologous MSCs reduced mean EED by −33.21% (95% CI, −43.61% to −22.81%; P Conclusions In this early-stage study of patients with ICM, transendocardial injection of allogeneic and autologous MSCs without a placebo control were both associated with low rates of treatment-emergent SAEs, including immunologic reactions. In aggregate, MSC injection favorably affected patient functional capacity, quality of life, and ventricular remodeling. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01087996

948 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
2021211
2020203
2019194
2018162
2017191