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Jatropha

About: Jatropha is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 2861 publications have been published within this topic receiving 59221 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Jatropha curcas is a tropical plant that can be grown in low to high rainfall areas and can be used to reclaim land, as a hedge and/or as a commercial crop.
Abstract: Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose plant with many attributes and considerable potential. It is a tropical plant that can be grown in low to high rainfall areas and can be used to reclaim land, as a hedge and/or as a commercial crop. Thus, growing it could provide employment, improve the environment and enhance the quality of rural life. The establishment, management and productivity of jatropha under various climatic conditions are not fully documented. This is discussed and the gaps in the knowledge elucidated, especially its fertilizer requirements. The plant produces many useful products, especially the seed, from which oil can be extracted; this oil has similar properties to palm oil. The costs and returns of growing the plant and producing the plant oil are discussed and tabulated. Because it can be used in place of kerosene and diesel and as a substitute for fuelwood, it has been promoted to make rural areas self sufficient in fuels for cooking, lighting and motive power. This strategy is examined and found not viable. Oil for soap making is the most profitable use. It is concluded that all markets for jatropha products should be investigated. If the full potential of the plant is to be realized, much more research is required into the growing and management of Jatropha curcas and more information is needed on the actual and potential markets for all its products.

1,213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an overview of the currently available information on the different process steps of the production process of bio-diesel from JCL, being cultivation and production of seeds, extraction of the oil, conversion to and the use of the biodiesel and the by-products.
Abstract: The interest in using Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) as a feedstock for the production of bio-diesel is rapidly growing. The properties of the crop and its oil have persuaded investors, policy makers and clean development mechanism (CDM) project developers to consider JCL as a substitute for fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, JCL is still a wild plant of which basic agronomic properties are not thoroughly understood and the environmental effects have not been investigated yet. Gray literature reports are very optimistic on simultaneous wasteland reclamation capability and oil yields, further fueling the Jatropha bio-diesel hype. In this paper, we give an overview of the currently available information on the different process steps of the production process of bio-diesel from JCL, being cultivation and production of seeds, extraction of the oil, conversion to and the use of the bio-diesel and the by-products. Based on this collection of data and information the best available practice, the shortcomings and the potential environmental risks and benefits are discussed for each production step. The review concludes with a call for general precaution and for science to be applied. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1,170 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used to optimize the three important reaction variables (methanol quantity, acid concentration, and reaction time) for reduction of free fatty acid (FFA) content of the oil to around 1% as compared to methanol quantity (M′) and reaction times (T′), and for carrying out transesterification of the pretreated oil.
Abstract: Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was used to optimize the three important reaction variables—methanol quantity (M), acid concentration (C) and reaction time (T) for reduction of free fatty acid (FFA) content of the oil to around 1% as compared to methanol quantity (M′) and reaction time (T′) and for carrying out transesterification of the pretreated oil. Using RSM, quadratic polynomial equations were obtained for predicting acid value and transesterification. Verification experiments confirmed the validity of both the predicted models. The optimum combination for reducing the FFA of Jatropha curcas oil from 14% to less than 1% was found to be 1.43% v/v H2SO4 acid catalyst, 0.28 v/v methanol-to-oil ratio and 88-min reaction time at a reaction temperature of 60 °C as compared to 0.16 v/v methanol-to-pretreated oil ratio and 24 min of reaction time at a reaction temperature of 60 °C for producing biodiesel. This process gave an average yield of biodiesel more than 99%. The fuel properties of jatropha biodiesel so obtained were found to be comparable to those of diesel and confirming to the American and European standards.

843 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Jatropha curcas, a multipurpose, drought resistant, perennial plant belonging to Euphorbiaceae family is gaining lot of importance for the production of biodiesel as mentioned in this paper, it is a tropical plant that can be grown in low to high rainfall areas either in the farms as a commercial crop or on the boundaries as a hedge to protect fields from grazing animals and to prevent erosion.

780 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: If a shift toward a greater contribution of bioenergy to energy supply takes place, the results of this study can be used to select the crops and countries that produce bioenergy in the most water-efficient way.
Abstract: All energy scenarios show a shift toward an increased percentage of renewable energy sources, including biomass. This study gives an overview of water footprints (WFs) of bioenergy from 12 crops that currently contribute the most to global agricultural production: barley, cassava, maize, potato, rapeseed, rice, rye, sorghum, soybean, sugar beet, sugar cane, and wheat. In addition, this study includes jatropha, a suitable energy crop. Since climate and production circumstances differ among regions, calculations have been performed by country. The WF of bioelectricity is smaller than that of biofuels because it is more efficient to use total biomass (e.g., for electricity or heat) than a fraction of the crop (its sugar, starch, or oil content) for biofuel. The WF of bioethanol appears to be smaller than that of biodiesel. For electricity, sugar beet, maize, and sugar cane are the most favorable crops [50 m3/gigajoule (GJ)]. Rapeseed and jatropha, typical energy crops, are disadvantageous (400 m3/GJ). For ethanol, sugar beet, and potato (60 and 100 m3/GJ) are the most advantageous, followed by sugar cane (110 m3/GJ); sorghum (400 m3/GJ) is the most unfavorable. For biodiesel, soybean and rapeseed show to be the most favorable WF (400 m3/GJ); jatropha has an adverse WF (600 m3/GJ). When expressed per L, the WF ranges from 1,400 to 20,000 L of water per L of biofuel. If a shift toward a greater contribution of bioenergy to energy supply takes place, the results of this study can be used to select the crops and countries that produce bioenergy in the most water-efficient way.

708 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202384
2022211
2021115
2020119
2019156
2018166