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Josephson effect

About: Josephson effect is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 19869 publications have been published within this topic receiving 342580 citations.


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Book
01 Jan 1975
TL;DR: In this article, a revised version of the book has been published to incorporate the many new developments in superconductivity, including new topics on high temperature superconductors and nonequilibrium superconductivities.
Abstract: Appropriate for intermediate or advanced courses in superconductivity, this edition has been revised to incorporate the many new developments in superconductivity. Expanded topic coverage includes new chapters on high temperature superconductors and nonequilibrium superconductivity.

7,800 citations

Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the properties of weak superconductivity and weak weak link structures, including the Josephson effect, and their application in superconducting Loops.
Abstract: Weak Superconductivity - Phenomenological Aspects. Microscopic Theory. Magnitude and Temperature Dependence of the Critical Current. ''Small'' Junctions in a Magnetic Field. Large Junctions - Static Self Field Effects. Current Voltage Characteristics. Other Superconducting Weak Link Structures. Device Fabrication Technology. Resonant Modes in Tunneling Structures. Fluxon Dynamics. High Frequency Properties and Applications of the Josephson Effect. Josephson Junctions in Super-conducting Loops. Squid's Theory and Applications. Computer Elements. Appendix. Systems of Units. Comments of Systems of Units. Conversion Tables. References.

2,404 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the properties of low-capacitance Josephson tunneling junctions and the practical and fundamental obstacles to their use for quantum information processing and describe how the basic physical manipulations on an ideal device can be combined to perform useful operations.
Abstract: Quantum-state engineering, i.e., active control over the coherent dynamics of suitable quantum-mechanical systems, has become a fascinating prospect of modern physics. With concepts developed in atomic and molecular physics and in the context of NMR, the field has been stimulated further by the perspectives of quantum computation and communication. Low-capacitance Josephson tunneling junctions offer a promising way to realize quantum bits (qubits) for quantum information processing. The article reviews the properties of these devices and the practical and fundamental obstacles to their use. Two kinds of device have been proposed, based on either charge or phase (flux) degrees of freedom. Single- and two-qubit quantum manipulations can be controlled by gate voltages in one case and by magnetic fields in the other case. Both kinds of device can be fabricated with present technology. In flux qubit devices, an important milestone, the observation of superpositions of different flux states in the system eigenstates, has been achieved. The Josephson charge qubit has even demonstrated coherent superpositions of states readable in the time domain. There are two major problems that must be solved before these devices can be used for quantum information processing. One must have a long phase coherence time, which requires that external sources of dephasing be minimized. The review discusses relevant parameters and provides estimates of the decoherence time. Another problem is in the readout of the final state of the system. This issue is illustrated with a possible realization by a single-electron transistor capacitively coupled to the Josephson device, but general properties of measuring devices are also discussed. Finally, the review describes how the basic physical manipulations on an ideal device can be combined to perform useful operations.

2,225 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the statistical properties of the scattering matrix of a mesoscopic system is presented, where two geometries are contrasted: a quantum dot and a disordered wire.
Abstract: This is a review of the statistical properties of the scattering matrix of a mesoscopic system. Two geometries are contrasted: A quantum dot and a disordered wire. The quantum dot is a confined region with a chaotic classical dynamics, which is coupled to two electron reservoirs via point contacts. The disordered wire also connects two reservoirs, either directly or via a point contact or tunnel barrier. One of the two reservoirs may be in the superconducting state, in which case conduction involves Andreev reflection at the interface with the superconductor. In the case of the quantum dot, the distribution of the scattering matrix is given by either Dyson{close_quote}s circular ensemble for ballistic point contacts or the Poisson kernel for point contacts containing a tunnel barrier. In the case of the disordered wire, the distribution of the scattering matrix is obtained from the Dorokhov-Mello-Pereyra-Kumar equation, which is a one-dimensional scaling equation. The equivalence is discussed with the nonlinear {sigma} model, which is a supersymmetric field theory of localization. The distribution of scattering matrices is applied to a variety of physical phenomena, including universal conductance fluctuations, weak localization, Coulomb blockade, sub-Poissonian shot noise, reflectionless tunneling into a superconductor, and giant conductance oscillationsmore » in a Josephson junction. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}« less

2,072 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuit family is reviewed and a discussion of possible future developments and applications of this novel, ultrafast digital technology is discussed.
Abstract: Recent developments concerning the rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuit family are reviewed. Elementary cells in this circuit family can generate, pass, memorize, and reproduce picosecond voltage pulses with a nominally quantized area corresponding to transfer of a single magnetic flux quantum across a Josephson junction. Functionally, each cell can be viewed as a combination of a logic gate and an output latch (register) controlled by clock pulses, which are physically similar to the signal pulses. Hand-shaking style of local exchange by the clock pulses enables one to increase complexity of the LSI RSFQ systems without loss of operating speed. The simplest components of the RSFQ circuitry have been experimentally tested at clock frequencies exceeding 100 GHz, and an increase of the speed beyond 300 GHz is expected as a result of using an up-to-date fabrication technology. This review includes a discussion of possible future developments and applications of this novel, ultrafast digital technology. >

2,013 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023355
2022671
2021478
2020541
2019540
2018496