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Journalism

About: Journalism is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 21144 publications have been published within this topic receiving 306243 citations. The topic is also known as: reporting.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In choosing and displaying news, editors, newsroom staff, and broadcasters play an important part in shaping political reality as mentioned in this paper, and readers learn not only about a given issue, but also how much importance to attach to that issue from the amount of information in a news story and its position.
Abstract: In choosing and displaying news, editors, newsroom staff, and broadcasters play an important part in shaping political reality. Readers learn not only about a given issue, but also how much importance to attach to that issue from the amount of information in a news story and its position. In reflecting what candidates are saying during a campaign, the mass media may well determine the important issues—that is, the media may jet the "agenda" of the campaign. The authors are associate professors of journalism at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

6,724 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: Gans's Deciding What's News as mentioned in this paper is a sociological account of some of the country's most prominent national news media, focusing on the values, professional standards, and external pressures that shaped journalists' judgments.
Abstract: For ten years, Herbert J. Gans spent considerable time in four major television and magazine newsrooms, observing and talking to the journalists who choose the national news stories that inform America about itself. Writing during the golden age of journalism. Gans included such headline events as the War on Poverty, the Vietnam War and the protests against it, urban ghetto disorders, the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and Watergate. He was interested in the values, professional standards, and the external pressures that shaped journalists' judgments. Deciding What's News has become a classic. A new preface outlines the major changes that have taken place in the news media since Gans first wrote the book, but it also suggests that the basics of news judgment and the structures of news organizations have changed little Gans's book is still the most comprehensive sociological account of some of the country's most prominent national news media. The book received the 1979 Theatre Library Association Award and the 1980 Book Award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. This is the first work to be published under the Medill School of Journalism's "Visions of the American Press" imprint, a new journalism history series featuring both original volumes and reprints of important classics.

2,085 citations

Book
01 Sep 2002
TL;DR: The Free Press as discussed by the authors is a rationally argued essay explaining the origins of those influences and factors that make the press less than what it should be honest: fair, and independent.
Abstract: Hilaire Belloc, a great English essayist of the 20th century, takes an uncompromising look at the forces working against the freedom of the press. Targeting financial and political influences, along with the influence of advertising, Belloc exposes the powers and motives responsible for the suppression of news and the manufacturing of opinion. Neither pie-in-the-sky idealism nor an irrational conspiracy theory, The Free Press is a rationally argued essay explaining the origins of those influences and factors that make the press less than what it should be honest: fair, and independent. This is a topical work written almost a century ago. Times have changed, but the situation has gone from bad to worse, and thus this work is even more relevant today. This book will be of interest to anyone, particularly the student of journalism and its history, who is curious about the rise of the major papers and media networks, and about the forces both overt and semi-covert working to shape what is reported and which opinions are sanctioned.

1,853 citations

Book
20 Oct 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, Postman alerts us to the real and present dangers of this state of affairs, and offers compelling suggestions as to how to withstand the media onslaught and how to shape our lives to serve out highest goals.
Abstract: Television has conditioned us to tolerate visually entertaining material measured out in spoonfuls of time, to the detriment of rational public discourse and reasoned public affairs. In this eloquent, persuasive book, Neil Postman alerts us to the real and present dangers of this state of affairs, and offers compelling suggestions as to how to withstand the media onslaught. Before we hand over politics, education, religion, and journalism to the show business demands of the television age, we must recognize the ways in which the media shape our lives and the ways we can, in turn, shape them to serve out highest goals.

1,645 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20231,123
20222,421
2021883
2020999
20191,121
20181,070