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Karma

About: Karma is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 999 publications have been published within this topic receiving 9303 citations. The topic is also known as: kamma.


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Book
Alan Roland1
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, a condition is the on that will make you feel that you must read, which is the condition that makes reading a need and a hobby at the same time.
Abstract: Some people may be laughing when looking at you reading in your spare time. Some may be admired of you. And some may want be like you who have reading hobby. What about your own feel? Have you felt right? Reading is a need and a hobby at once. This condition is the on that will make you feel that you must read. If you know are looking for the book enPDFd in search of self in india and japan toward a cross cultural psychology as the choice of reading, you can find here.

473 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The Karma of Brown Folk as discussed by the authors explores the long history of black and South Asian solidarity, discussing joint struggles in the U.S., the Caribbean, South Africa and elsewhere, and exposes how these powerful moments of alliance faded from historical memory and were replaced by Indian support for antiblack racism.
Abstract: On a vast canvas, The Karma of Brown Folk attacks the two pillars of the "model minority" image, that South Asians are both inherently successful and pliant, and analyzes the ways in which U.S. immigration policy and American Orientalism have perpetuated these stereotypes. Prashad uses irony, humor, razor-sharp criticism, personal reflections, and historical research to challenge the arguments made by Dinesh D'Souza, who heralds South Asian success in the U.S., and to question the quiet accommodation to racism made by many South Asians. A look at Deepak Chopra and others whom Prashad terms "Godmen" shows us how some South Asians exploit the stereotype of inherent spirituality, much to the chagrin of other South Asians. Following the long engagement of American culture with South Asia, Prashad traces India's effect on thinkers like Cotton Mather and Henry David Thoreau, Ravi Shankar's influence on John Coltrane, and such essential issues as race versus caste and the connection between antiracism activism and anticolonial resistance.The Karma of Brown Folk locates the birth of the "model minority" myth, placing it firmly in the context of reaction to the struggle for Black Liberation. Prashad reclaims the long history of black and South Asian solidarity, discussing joint struggles in the U.S., the Caribbean, South Africa, and elsewhere, and exposes how these powerful moments of alliance faded from historical memory and were replaced by Indian support for antiblack racism. Ultimately, Prashad writes not just about South Asians in America but about America itself, in the tradition of Tocqueville, Du Bois, Richard Wright, and others. He explores the place of collective struggle andmultiracial alliances in the transformation of self and community -- in short, how Americans define themselves.

394 citations

Book
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The importance of ethics in the Buddha's teachings is widely acknowledged, but the pursuit of ethical ideals has up to now been widely held to be secondary to the attainment of knowledge as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In this book the author considers data from both early and later schools of Buddhism in an attempt to provide an overall characterization of the structure of Buddhist ethics. The importance of ethics in the Buddha's teachings is widely acknowledged, but the pursuit of ethical ideals has up to now been widely held to be secondary to the attainment of knowledge. Drawing on the Aristotelian tradition of ethics the author argues against this intellectualization of Buddhism and in favour of a new understanding of the tradition in terms of which ethics plays an absolutely central role. In the course of this reassessment many basic concepts such as karma, nirvana, and the Eightfold Path, are reviewed and presented in a fresh light. The book will be of interest to readers with a background in either Buddhist studies or comparative religious ethics.

215 citations

Book
22 Jun 2000
TL;DR: Buddhist ethics: Shared foundations of Buddhist ethics: sources of guidance to Buddhists Rebirth and karma The four noble truths Philosophy of action as mentioned in this paper, key Buddhist values giving Keeping the lay precepts Monastic values Ethics of inter-personal relationships Loving kindness and compassion Social ethics.
Abstract: 1. Shared foundations of Buddhist ethics: sources of guidance to Buddhists Rebirth and karma The four noble truths Philosophy of action 2. Key Buddhist values giving Keeping the lay precepts Monastic values Ethics of inter-personal relationships Loving kindness and compassion Social ethics 3. Mahayana emphases and adaptations: the path of the Bodhisattva The ethics of the Bodhisattva Skilful means and overriding precepts Specific strands of Mahayana thought and practice Mahayana reassessment of monasticism 4. Attitude to and treatment of the natural world Humanity's place in nature Non-harming of animals Positive regard, and help, for animals Plants, trees and forests Conservation and environmentalism 5. Economic ethics Lay economic ethics The monastic economy Buddhism and capitalism: Weber's 'Protestant Ethic' thesis 'Buddhist economics' Buddhism and economics in the modern world 6. War and peace Buddhist analyses of the causes of conflict Solutions to conflict Non-violent reflections on a violent world The position of the soldier Buddhist 'justifications' of and involvement in, violence Buddhist action for peace in the modern world 7. Suicide and euthanasia considerations and arguments against suicide Suicide and the precepts Euthanasia 8. Abortion and contraception Embryonic life Abortion and Buddhist principles Contraception Abortion in Buddhist cultures Anti-abortion but pro-choice?: the relationship between morality and law 9. The status of women: women in early Hinduism the effect of Buddhism The spiritual potential and achievement of women Gender, rebirth and the status of women Views on spiritual statuses unattainable by women Images of wise and wayward women Ascetic wariness of the opposite sex The ordination of women Nuns and other female religious roles in Buddhist cultures Lay women in Buddhist texts Lay women in Buddhist cultures 10. Homosexuality and other forms of 'Queerness' Sex change Hermaphrodites Pandakas Homosexual acts Homosexuality in Buddhist cultures.

187 citations

Book
06 Apr 2003
TL;DR: Kieschnick as discussed by the authors examined the ambivalent relationship between Buddhism and material culture and found that even some everyday objects not ordinarily associated with Buddhism were intimately tied to Buddhist ideas and practices.
Abstract: From the first century, when Buddhism entered China, the foreign religion shaped Chinese philosophy, beliefs, and ritual. At the same time, Buddhism had a profound effect on the material world of the Chinese. This wide-ranging study shows that Buddhism brought with it a vast array of objects big and small--relics treasured as parts of the body of the Buddha, prayer beads, and monastic clothing--as well as new ideas about what objects could do and how they should be treated. Kieschnick argues that even some everyday objects not ordinarily associated with Buddhism--bridges, tea, and the chair--on closer inspection turn out to have been intimately tied to Buddhist ideas and practices. Long after Buddhism ceased to be a major force in India, it continued to influence the development of material culture in China, as it does to the present day. At first glance, this seems surprising. Many Buddhist scriptures and thinkers rejected the material world or even denied its existence with great enthusiasm and sophistication. Others, however, from Buddhist philosophers to ordinary devotees, embraced objects as a means of expressing religious sentiments and doctrines. What was a sad sign of compromise and decline for some was seen as strength and versatility by others. Yielding rich insights through its innovative analysis of particular types of objects, this briskly written book is the first to systematically examine the ambivalent relationship, in the Chinese context, between Buddhism and material culture.

167 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202395
2022271
202136
202051
201945
201852