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Keypunch

About: Keypunch is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 33 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 125 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A detailed and exemplified account is given on the invention and development of the Hollerith Punched Card from the beginning in 1886 until 1928. The change of use from counting to value statistics is shown. The size of the Hollerith Punched Card was standardized very early. The cards were soon used both for data capture and data punching - the dual purpose punched card. The first Hollerith cards were punched with a conductor's punch, soon be replaced by the Pantograph Punch, and, after the decimal columns have appeared, a Mechanical Key Punch, the Type 001, later replaced by the Electrical Key Punch Type 011, was used.

20 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article provides generalized keying rate information in terms of the time between keystrokes, theTime between records and fields, and the burst rates for multiple keystroke in a typical data entry application.
Abstract: Designers of systems which provide for data entry from a keyboard are usually concerned about the rate and manner that keyed data will enter the system. This article provides generalized keying rate information in terms of the time between keystrokes, the time between records and fields, and the burst rates for multiple keystrokes. The time interval data is presented in the form of cumulative relative frequency distribution curves. The analyses are based on more than one million keystrokes of data that were collected with fifteen keypunch operators on an IBM 3741 data entry system in a typical data entry application.

12 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The author traces the development of the Hollerith tabulating machine, what is part of theollen punched card system, during the years 1905 until 1913, and describes the machine's applications of most interest to customers at that time.
Abstract: The author traces the development of the Hollerith tabulating machine, what is part of the Hollerith punched card system during the years 1905 until 1913, and describes the machine's applications of most interest to customers at that time. Hollerith added the plugboard for flexible wiring to his tabulating machine for different applications, as a result of customer demand.

12 citations


Patent
09 Dec 1970
Abstract: This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for automatically conducting an interview and recording responses elicited from the person interviewed. The apparatus includes means for controlling a magnetic tape recorder which presents questions in both a pre-determined and ordered fashion. The apparatus also includes means for recognizing and attempting to rectify improper responses at or shortly after the time that they are elicited. In addition, means are also provided for interpreting the resulting tape for automatic data entry into a keypunch machine, keytape recorder, data terminal, magnetic tape typewriter, computer or similar data entry or storage device.

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An encoding system at Indiana University that consists of two independent but related encoding devices: a sonic digitizer and an organ keyboard, both attached to the computer, which permit the operator to enter data directly from the score for automatic conversion into computer-usable code without initmate knowledge of the code itself or the cumbersome proofreading normally associated with keypunching.
Abstract: The high-speed digital computer has provided the musician with a powerful tool for music research. In information retrieval, analysis, digital sound synthesis, and music printing, studies have clearly demonstrated the computer's potential for assisting the musician.' At the same time, however, the difficulty of preparing music data for computer processing has been, and continues to be, a major deterrent to large-scale computer-aided music studies. At present, notwithstanding several experiments in which special optical devices have been used in the encoding process,2 the only generally available device for converting music scores to computer-usable code is the keypunch machine. But the keypunch is an awkward device for encoding music: its character set is not compatible with music symbols; it is tedious to use; and proofreading of encoded materials is cumbersome and timeconsuming, even for those whose computer installations provide on-line text editing. As an alternative to both optical encoding, which is highly desirable but developed for only the simplest encoding tasks, and the keypunch machine, which is available but generally unappealing to the musician, we are developing an encoding system at Indiana University that consists of two independent but related encoding devices: a sonic digitizer and an organ keyboard, both attached to the computer, which permit the operator to enter data directly from the score for automatic conversion into computer-usable code without initmate knowledge of the code itself or the cumbersome proofreading normally associated with keypunching. Once data are encoded, the programs output the code into standard card-image format for storage on magnetic tape. This feature allows a tape to be processed at any computer installation capable of handling magnetic tape. For portability, all programs are written in ANSI standard FORTRAN to allow operation on any computer with a FORTRAN compiler and appropriate encoding devices and display equipment. The encoding language, the MUSTRAN code originated by Jerome Wenker,3 was chosen for several reasons. First, MUSTRAN is a largely mnemonic code and is relatively complete. Second, it has an operational translator and syntax analyzer that we have running on our CDC 6600 computer on campus. (Versions are also available for IBM and UNIVAC machines.) Third, Wenker having recently updated his language and its associated translator and syntax analyzer (called MUSTRAN II), the language is maintained and current. And fourth, our Computer Music System (discussed briefly below) uses MUSTRAN for encoding, music printing, and analysis. At the same time, however, we realize that the DARMS (Ford-Columbia) language is also carefully designed. It recently has been written in canonical form4 and will no doubt eventually have its own translator and syntax analyzer. Since DARMS is a complete language, and in view of the current efforts being made in its behalf, we are now developing DARMS-toMUSTRAN and MUSTRAN-to-DARMS conve sion packages that will eventually allow us to encode in one language and conveniently convert

8 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20131
20051
19911
19811
19782
19771