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L-attributed grammar

About: L-attributed grammar is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2541 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 58591 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A parsing algorithm which seems to be the most efficient general context-free algorithm known is described. It is similar to both Knuth's LR(k) algorithm and the familiar top-down algorithm. It has a time bound proportional to n3 (where n is the length of the string being parsed) in general; it has an n2 bound for unambiguous grammars; and it runs in linear time on a large class of grammars, which seems to include most practical context-free programming language grammars. In an empirical comparison it appears to be superior to the top-down and bottom-up algorithms studied by Griffiths and Petrick.

1,481 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of augmented transition network grammars for the analysis of natural language sentences is described, and structure-building actions associated with the arcs of the grammar network allow for a powerful selectivity which can rule out meaningless analyses and take advantage of semantic information to guide the parsing.
Abstract: The use of augmented transition network grammars for the analysis of natural language sentences is described Structure-building actions associated with the arcs of the grammar network allow for the reordering, restructuring, and copying of constituents necessary to produce deep-structure representations of the type normally obtained from a transformational analysis, and conditions on the arcs allow for a powerful selectivity which can rule out meaningless analyses and take advantage of semantic information to guide the parsing The advantages of this model for natural language analysis are discussed in detail and illustrated by examples An implementation of an experimental parsing system for transition network grammars is briefly described

1,353 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A sequence of restrictions that limit grammars first to Turing machines, then to two types of system from which a phrase structure description of the generated language can be drawn, and finally to finite state Markov sources are shown to be increasingly heavy.
Abstract: A grammar can be regarded as a device that enumerates the sentences of a language. We study a sequence of restrictions that limit grammars first to Turing machines, then to two types of system from which a phrase structure description of the generated language can be drawn, and finally to finite state Markov sources (finite automata). These restrictions are shown to be increasingly heavy in the sense that the languages that can be generated by grammars meeting a given restriction constitute a proper subset of those that can be generated by grammars meeting the preceding restriction. Various formulations of phrase structure description are considered, and the source of their excess generative power over finite state sources is investigated in greater detail.

1,254 citations


Book
01 Jan 1989-
TL;DR: This book presents 25 different regulating mechanisms by definitions, examples and basic facts, especially concerning hierarchies, as well as selective substitution grammars as one common generalization.
Abstract: It is well-known that context-free grammars cannot cover all aspects of natural languages, progamming languages and other related fields. Therefore a lot of mechanisms have been introduced which control the application of context-free rules. This book presents 25 different regulating mechanisms by definitions, examples and basic facts, especially concerning hierarchies. Matrix, programmed, and random context grammars as typical representants are studied in more detail. Besides their algebraic and decidability properties a comparison is made with respect to syntactic complexity measures and pure versions. Further topics are combinations of some control mechanisms, regulated L systems, automata characterizations, Szilard languages, and grammar forms of regulated grammars as well as selective substitution grammars as one common generalization.

838 citations


Posted Content
Abstract: We develop a formal grammatical system called a link grammar, show how English grammar can be encoded in such a system, and give algorithms for efficiently parsing with a link grammar. Although the expressive power of link grammars is equivalent to that of context free grammars, encoding natural language grammars appears to be much easier with the new system. We have written a program for general link parsing and written a link grammar for the English language. The performance of this preliminary system -- both in the breadth of English phenomena that it captures and in the computational resources used -- indicates that the approach may have practical uses as well as linguistic significance. Our program is written in C and may be obtained through the internet.

828 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20201
20183
201739
201655
201582

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Alexander Okhotin

31 papers, 627 citations

Joost Engelfriet

27 papers, 975 citations

Grzegorz Rozenberg

25 papers, 741 citations

Alexander Meduna

21 papers, 131 citations

Görel Hedin

17 papers, 525 citations