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Language acquisition

About: Language acquisition is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 33975 publications have been published within this topic receiving 957211 citations. The topic is also known as: language learning.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: It is concluded that language acquisition occurs best when language is used for the purpose for which it was designed: communication.
Abstract: This text explores the relationship between second language teaching practice and what is known about the process of second language acquisition and summarizes the current state of second language acquisition theory.-- Draws general conclusions about the application of theory to methods and materials and describes the characteristics that effective materials should include.-- Concludes that language acquisition occurs best when language is used for the purpose for which it was designed: communication.

6,737 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: 1. Looking at Language Learning Strategies 2. Direct Strategies for Dealing with Language 3. Applying Direct Strategies to the Four Language Skills 4. Indirect Strategies for General Management of Learning 5. App applying Indirect strategies to the four Language Skills 6. Language Learning Strategy Assessment and Training
Abstract: 1. Looking at Language Learning Strategies 2. Direct Strategies for Dealing with Language 3. Applying Direct Strategies to the Four Language Skills 4. Indirect Strategies for General Management of Learning 5. Applying Indirect Strategies to the Four Language Skills 6. Language Learning Strategy Assessment and Training 7. Networking at Home and Abroad

5,534 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
13 Dec 1996-Science
TL;DR: The present study shows that a fundamental task of language acquisition, segmentation of words from fluent speech, can be accomplished by 8-month-old infants based solely on the statistical relationships between neighboring speech sounds.
Abstract: Learners rely on a combination of experience-independent and experience-dependent mechanisms to extract information from the environment. Language acquisition involves both types of mechanisms, but most theorists emphasize the relative importance of experience-independent mechanisms. The present study shows that a fundamental task of language acquisition, segmentation of words from fluent speech, can be accomplished by 8-month-old infants based solely on the statistical relationships between neighboring speech sounds. Moreover, this word segmentation was based on statistical learning from only 2 minutes of exposure, suggesting that infants have access to a powerful mechanism for the computation of statistical properties of the language input.

4,352 citations

Book
Roger Brown1
01 Jan 1973
TL;DR: This article studied the early stages of grammatical constructions and the meanings they convey in pre-school children and found that the order of their acquisition is almost identical across children and is predicted by their relative semantic and grammatical complexity.
Abstract: For many years, Roger Brown and his colleagues have studied the developing language of pre-school children--the language that ultimately will permit them to understand themselves and the world around them. This longitudinal research project records the conversational performances of three children, studying both semantic and grammatical aspects of their language development. These core findings are related to recent work in psychology and linguistics--and especially to studies of the acquisition of languages other than English, including Finnish, German, Korean, and Samoan. Roger Brown has written the most exhaustive and searching analysis yet undertaken of the early stages of grammatical constructions and the meanings they convey. The five stages of linguistic development Brown establishes are measured not by chronological age-since children vary greatly in the speed at which their speech develops--but by mean length of utterance. This volume treats the first two stages. Stage I is the threshold of syntax, when children begin to combine words to make sentences. These sentences, Brown shows, are always limited to the same small set of semantic relations: nomination, recurrence, disappearance, attribution, possession, agency, and a few others. Stage II is concerned with the modulations of basic structural meanings--modulations for number, time, aspect, specificity--through the gradual acquisition of grammatical morphemes such as inflections, prepositions, articles, and case markers. Fourteen morphemes are studied in depth and it is shown that the order of their acquisition is almost identical across children and is predicted by their relative semantic and grammaticalcomplexity. It is, ultimately, the intent of this work to focus on the nature and development of knowledge: knowledge concerning grammar and the meanings coded by grammar; knowledge inferred from performance, from sentences and the settings in which they are spoken, and from signs of comprehension or incomprehension of sentences.

4,302 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Schmidt as mentioned in this paper presented on the role of consciousness in second language learning at the 1988 Second Language Research Forum (SLRF) held in at the University of Hawai'i, USA.
Abstract: Richard Schmidt presents on the role of consciousness in second language learning at the 1988 Second Language Research Forum (SLRF) held in at the University of Hawai‘i.

4,131 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023342
2022648
20211,339
20201,745
20191,727
20181,740