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Laughter

About: Laughter is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3953 publications have been published within this topic receiving 67820 citations. The topic is also known as: laughing & laugh.


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Book
11 Dec 1986
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of positive moods and happiness on happiness enhancement are discussed. But they focus on the positive emotions rather than the negative emotions, such as sadness, joy, and happiness enhancement.
Abstract: Introduction. How to measure and study happiness. Joy and other positive emotions. Satisfaction. Humour and laughter. Social relationships. Work and employment. Leisure. Money, class and education. Personality, age and gender. Religion. National differences in happiness. Happiness enhancement. The effects of positive moods and happiness. Conclusions.

1,661 citations

Book
16 Oct 2006
TL;DR: Theories and Early Research I: Psychoanalytic and Superiority Theories; Applications of Humor to Psychotherapy, Education, and the Workplace.
Abstract: Preliminary TOC Chapter 1 Introduction to the Psychology of Humor Chapter 2 Theories and Early Research I: Psychoanalytic and Superiority Theories Chapter 3 Theories and Early Research II: Arousal, Incongruity, and Reversal Theories Chapter 4 The Cognitive Psychology of Humor Chapter 5 The Social Psychology of Humor Chapter 6 The Psychobiology of Humor and Laughter Chapter 7 Personality Approaches to Sense of Humor Chapter 8 The Developmental Psychology of Humor Chapter 9 Humor and Mental Health Chapter 10 Humor, Laughter, and Physical Health Chapter 11 Applications of Humor to Psychotherapy, Education, and the Workplace

1,322 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: De Sousa as discussed by the authors argues that emotions are a kind of perception, that their roots in the paradigm scenarios in which they are learned give them an essentially dramatic structure, and that they have a crucial role to play in rational beliefs, desires, and decisions by breaking the deadlocks of pure reason.
Abstract: In this urbane and witty book, Ronald de Sousa disputes the widespread notion that reason and emotion are natural antagonists. He argues that emotions are a kind of perception, that their roots in the paradigm scenarios in which they are learned give them an essentially dramatic structure, and that they have a crucial role to-play in rational beliefs, desires, and decisions by breaking the deadlocks of pure reason.The book's twelve chapters take up the following topics: alternative models of mind and emotion; the relation between evolutionary, physiological, and social factors in emotions; a taxonomy of objects of emotions; assessments of emotions for correctness and rationality; the regulation by emotions of logical and practical reasoning; emotion and time; the mechanism of emotional self-deception; the ethics of laughter; and the roles of emotions in the conduct of life. There is also an illustrative interlude, in the form of a lively dialogue about the ideology of love, jealousy, and sexual exclusiveness.Ronald de Sousa teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto. A Bradford Book.

837 citations

Book
01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: Darnton as mentioned in this paper investigates why the apprentices of a Paris printing shop held a series of mock trials and then hanged all the cats they could lay their hands on, and why they found it so hilariously funny that they choked with laughter when they reenacted it in pantomime some twenty times.
Abstract: When the apprentices of a Paris printing shop in the 1730s held a series of mock trials and then hanged all the cats they could lay their hands on, why did they find it so hilariously funny that they choked with laughter when they reenacted it in pantomime some twenty times? Why in the eighteenth-century version of Little Red Riding Hood did the wolf eat the child at the end? What did the anonymous townsman of Montpelier have in mind when he kept an exhaustive dossier on all the activities of his native city? These are some of the provocative questions Robert Darnton answers in this classic work of European history in what we like to call The Age of Enlightenment.

822 citations

Book
19 Jul 2005
TL;DR: A Critique of Positive Humour Part One: HISTORICAL ASPECTS superiority theories Hobbes and other Misogelasts Incongruity Theories and Gentlemanly Laughter Victorian Relief Theory Bergson and the Function of Humour Freud and the Hidden Secrets of Jokes Part Two: THEORETICAL ASPEECTS Laughter and Unlaughter Embarrassment, Humour and the Social Order Final Remarks
Abstract: Introduction A Critique of Positive Humour PART ONE: HISTORICAL ASPECTS Superiority Theories Hobbes and other Misogelasts Incongruity Theories and Gentlemanly Laughter Victorian Relief Theory Bergson and the Function of Humour Freud and the Hidden Secrets of Jokes PART TWO: THEORETICAL ASPECTS Laughter and Unlaughter Embarrassment, Humour and the Social Order Final Remarks

659 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023198
2022531
2021110
2020170
2019161
2018175