scispace - formally typeset

Topic

Line segment

About: Line segment is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 5687 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 72231 citation(s). The topic is also known as: line & segment.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The mammalian visual system is endowed with a nearly infinite capacity for the recognition of patterns and objects, but to have acquired this capability the visual system must have solved what is a fundamentally combinatorial prob­ lem.
Abstract: The mammalian visual system is endowed with a nearly infinite capacity for the recognition of patterns and objects. To have acquired this capability the visual system must have solved what is a fundamentally combinatorial prob­ lem. Any given image consists of a collection of features, consisting of local contrast borders of luminance and wavelength, distributed across the visual field. For one to detect and recognize an object within a scene, the features comprising the object must be identified and segregated from those comprising other objects. This problem is inherently difficult to solve because of the combinatorial nature of visual images. To appreciate this point, consider a simple local feature such as a small vertically oriented line segment placed within a fixed location of the visual field. When combined with other line segments, this feature can form a nearly infinite number of geometrical objects. Any one of these objects may coexist with an equally large number of other

3,106 citations

Book
01 Aug 1981
TL;DR: This chapter discusses Graphics, Image Processing, and Pattern Recognition, and the Reconstruction techniques used in this program, as well as some of the problems faced in implementing this program.
Abstract: 1: Introduction.- 1.1 Graphics, Image Processing, and Pattern Recognition.- 1.2 Forms of Pictorial Data.- 1.2.1 Class 1: Full Gray Scale and Color Pictures.- 1.2.2 Class 2: Bilevel or "Few Color" pictures.- 1.2.3 Class 3: Continuous Curves and Lines.- 1.2.4 Class 4: Points or Polygons.- 1.3 Pictorial Input.- 1.4 Display Devices.- 1.5 Vector Graphics.- 1.6 Raster Graphics.- 1.7 Common Primitive Graphic Instructions.- 1.8 Comparison of Vector and Raster Graphics.- 1.9 Pictorial Editor.- 1.10 Pictorial Transformations.- 1.11 Algorithm Notation.- 1.12 A Few Words on Complexity.- 1.13 Bibliographical Notes.- 1.14 Relevant Literature.- 1.15 Problems.- 2: Digitization of Gray Scale Images.- 2.1 Introduction.- 2.2 A Review of Fourier and other Transforms.- 2.3 Sampling.- 2.3.1 One-dimensional Sampling.- 2.3.2 Two-dimensional Sampling.- 2.4 Aliasing.- 2.5 Quantization.- 2.6 Bibliographical Notes.- 2.7 Relevant Literature.- 2.8 Problems.- Appendix 2.A: Fast Fourier Transform.- 3: Processing of Gray Scale Images.- 3.1 Introduction.- 3.2 Histogram and Histogram Equalization.- 3.3 Co-occurrence Matrices.- 3.4 Linear Image Filtering.- 3.5 Nonlinear Image Filtering.- 3.5.1 Directional Filters.- 3.5.2 Two-part Filters.- 3.5.3 Functional Approximation Filters.- 3.6 Bibliographical Notes.- 3.7 Relevant Literature.- 3.8 Problems.- 4: Segmentation.- 4.1 Introduction.- 4.2 Thresholding.- 4.3 Edge Detection.- 4.4 Segmentation by Region Growing.- 4.4.1 Segmentation by Average Brightness Level.- 4.4.2 Other Uniformity Criteria.- 4.5 Bibliographical Notes.- 4.6 Relevant Literature.- 4.7 Problems.- 5: Projections.- 5.1 Introduction.- 5.2 Introduction to Reconstruction Techniques.- 5.3 A Class of Reconstruction Algorithms.- 5.4 Projections for Shape Analysis.- 5.5 Bibliographical Notes.- 5.6 Relevant Literature.- 5.7 Problems.- Appendix 5.A: An Elementary Reconstruction Program.- 6: Data Structures.- 6.1 Introduction.- 6.2 Graph Traversal Algorithms.- 6.3 Paging.- 6.4 Pyramids or Quad Trees.- 6.4.1 Creating a Quad Tree.- 6.4.2 Reconstructing an Image from a Quad Tree.- 6.4.3 Image Compaction with a Quad Tree.- 6.5 Binary Image Trees.- 6.6 Split-and-Merge Algorithms.- 6.7 Line Encodings and the Line Adjacency Graph.- 6.8 Region Encodings and the Region Adjacency Graph.- 6.9 Iconic Representations.- 6.10 Data Structures for Displays.- 6.11 Bibliographical Notes.- 6.12 Relevant Literature.- 6.13 Problems.- Appendix 6.A: Introduction to Graphs.- 7: Bilevel Pictures.- 7.1 Introduction.- 7.2 Sampling and Topology.- 7.3 Elements of Discrete Geometry.- 7.4 A Sampling Theorem for Class 2 Pictures.- 7.5 Contour Tracing.- 7.5.1 Tracing of a Single Contour.- 7.5.2 Traversal of All the Contours of a Region.- 7.6 Curves and Lines on a Discrete Grid.- 7.6.1 When a Set of Pixels is not a Curve.- 7.6.2 When a Set of Pixels is a Curve.- 7.7 Multiple Pixels.- 7.8 An Introduction to Shape Analysis.- 7.9 Bibliographical Notes.- 7.10 Relevant Literature.- 7.11 Problems.- 8: Contour Filling.- 8.1 Introduction.- 8.2 Edge Filling.- 8.3 Contour Filling by Parity Check.- 8.3.1 Proof of Correctness of Algorithm 8.3.- 8.3.2 Implementation of a Parity Check Algorithm.- 8.4 Contour Filling by Connectivity.- 8.4.1 Recursive Connectivity Filling.- 8.4.2 Nonrecursive Connectivity Filling.- 8.4.3 Procedures used for Connectivity Filling.- 8.4.4 Description of the Main Algorithm.- 8.5 Comparisons and Combinations.- 8.6 Bibliographical Notes.- 8.7 Relevant Literature.- 8.8 Problems.- 9: Thinning Algorithms.- 9.1 Introduction.- 9.2 Classical Thinning Algorithms.- 9.3 Asynchronous Thinning Algorithms.- 9.4 Implementation of an Asynchronous Thinning Algorithm.- 9.5 A Quick Thinning Algorithm.- 9.6 Structural Shape Analysis.- 9.7 Transformation of Bilevel Images into Line Drawings.- 9.8 Bibliographical Notes.- 9.9 Relevant Literature.- 9.10 Problems.- 10: Curve Fitting and Curve Displaying.- 10.1 Introduction.- 10.2 Polynomial Interpolation.- 10.3 Bezier Polynomials.- 10.4 Computation of Bezier Polynomials.- 10.5 Some Properties of Bezier Polynomials.- 10.6 Circular Arcs.- 10.7 Display of Lines and Curves.- 10.7.1 Display of Curves through Differential Equations.- 10.7.2 Effect of Round-off Errors in Displays.- 10.8 A Point Editor.- 10.8.1 A Data Structure for a Point Editor.- 10.8.2 Input and Output for a Point Editor.- 10.9 Bibliographical Notes.- 10.10 Relevant Literature.- 10.11 Problems.- 11: Curve Fitting with Splines.- 11.1 Introduction.- 11.2 Fundamental Definitions.- 11.3 B-Splines.- 11.4 Computation with B-Splines.- 11.5 Interpolating B-Splines.- 11.6 B-Splines in Graphics.- 11.7 Shape Description and B-splines.- 11.8 Bibliographical Notes.- 11.9 Relevant Literature.- 11.10 Problems.- 12: Approximation of Curves.- 12.1 Introduction.- 12.2 Integral Square Error Approximation.- 12.3 Approximation Using B-Splines.- 12.4 Approximation by Splines with Variable Breakpoints.- 12.5 Polygonal Approximations.- 12.5.1 A Suboptimal Line Fitting Algorithm.- 12.5.2 A Simple Polygon Fitting Algorithm.- 12.5.3 Properties of Algorithm 12.2.- 12.6 Applications of Curve Approximation in Graphics.- 12.6.1 Handling of Groups of Points by a Point Editor.- 12.6.2 Finding Some Simple Approximating Curves.- 12.7 Bibliographical Notes.- 12.8 Relevant Literature.- 12.9 Problems.- 13: Surface Fitting and Surface Displaying.- 13.1 Introduction.- 13.2 Some Simple Properties of Surfaces.- 13.3 Singular Points of a Surface.- 13.4 Linear and Bilinear Interpolating Surface Patches.- 13.5 Lofted Surfaces.- 13.6 Coons Surfaces.- 13.7 Guided Surfaces.- 13.7.1 Bezier Surfaces.- 13.7.2 B-Spline Surfaces.- 13.8 The Choice of a Surface Partition.- 13.9 Display of Surfaces and Shading.- 13.10 Bibliographical Notes.- 13.11 Relevant Literature.- 13.12 Problems.- 14: The Mathematics of Two-Dimensional Graphics.- 14.1 Introduction.- 14.2 Two-Dimensional Transformations.- 14.3 Homogeneous Coordinates.- 14.3.1 Equation of a Line Defined by Two Points.- 14.3.2 Coordinates of a Point Defined as the Intersection of Two Lines.- 14.3.3 Duality.- 14.4 Line Segment Problems.- 14.4.1 Position of a Point with respect to a Line.- 14.4.2 Intersection of Line Segments.- 14.4.3 Position of a Point with respect to a Polygon.- 14.4.4 Segment Shadow.- 14.5 Bibliographical Notes.- 14.6 Relevant Literature.- 14.7 Problems.- 15: Polygon Clipping.- 15.1 Introduction.- 15.2 Clipping a Line Segment by a Convex Polygon.- 15.3 Clipping a Line Segment by a Regular Rectangle.- 15.4 Clipping an Arbitrary Polygon by a Line.- 15.5 Intersection of Two Polygons.- 15.6 Efficient Polygon Intersection.- 15.7 Bibliographical Notes.- 15.8 Relevant Literature.- 15.9 Problems.- 16: The Mathematics of Three-Dimensional Graphics.- 16.1 Introduction.- 16.2 Homogeneous Coordinates.- 16.2.1 Position of a Point with respect to a Plane.- 16.2.2 Intersection of Triangles.- 16.3 Three-Dimensional Transformations.- 16.3.1 Mathematical Preliminaries.- 16.3.2 Rotation around an Axis through the Origin.- 16.4 Orthogonal Projections.- 16.5 Perspective Projections.- 16.6 Bibliographical Notes.- 16.7 Relevant Literature.- 16.8 Problems.- 17: Creating Three-Dimensional Graphic Displays.- 17.1 Introduction.- 17.2 The Hidden Line and Hidden Surface Problems.- 17.2.1 Surface Shadow.- 17.2.2 Approaches to the Visibility Problem.- 17.2.3 Single Convex Object Visibility.- 17.3 A Quad Tree Visibility Algorithm.- 17.4 A Raster Line Scan Visibility Algorithm.- 17.5 Coherence.- 17.6 Nonlinear Object Descriptions.- 17.7 Making a Natural Looking Display.- 17.8 Bibliographical Notes.- 17.9 Relevant Literature.- 17.10 Problems.- Author Index.- Algorithm Index.

1,383 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A linear-time line segment detector that gives accurate results, a controlled number of false detections, and requires no parameter tuning is proposed.
Abstract: We propose a linear-time line segment detector that gives accurate results, a controlled number of false detections, and requires no parameter tuning. This algorithm is tested and compared to state-of-the-art algorithms on a wide set of natural images.

1,361 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: LSD is a linear-time Line Segment Detector giving subpixel accurate results and uses an a contrario validation approach according to Desolneux, Moisan, and Morel’s theory.
Abstract: LSD is a linear-time Line Segment Detector giving subpixel accurate results. It is designed to work on any digital image without parameter tuning. It controls its own number of false detections: on average, one false alarm is allowed per image [1]. The method is based on Burns, Hanson, and Riseman’s method [2], and uses an a contrario validation approach according to Desolneux, Moisan, and Morel’s theory [3, 4]. The version described here includes some further

573 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1999
TL;DR: A new approach for computing generalized 2D and 3D Voronoi diagrams using interpolation-based polygon rasterization hardware is presented and the application of this algorithm to fast motion planning in static and dynamic environments, selection in complex user-interfaces, and creation of dynamic mosaic effects is demonstrated.
Abstract: We present a new approach for computing generalized 2D and 3D Voronoi diagrams using interpolation-based polygon rasterization hardware. We compute a discrete Voronoi diagram by rendering a three dimensional distance mesh for each Voronoi site. The polygonal mesh is a bounded-error approximation of a (possibly) non-linear function of the distance between a site and a 2D planar grid of sample points. For each sample point, we compute the closest site and the distance to that site using polygon scan-conversion and the Z-buffer depth comparison. We construct distance meshes for points, line segments, polygons, polyhedra, curves, and curved surfaces in 2D and 3D. We generalize to weighted and farthest-site Voronoi diagrams, and present efficient techniques for computing the Voronoi boundaries, Voronoi neighbors, and the Delaunay triangulation of points. We also show how to adaptively refine the solution through a simple windowing operation. The algorithm has been implemented on SGI workstations and PCs using OpenGL, and applied to complex datasets. We demonstrate the application of our algorithm to fast motion planning in static and dynamic environments, selection in complex user-interfaces, and creation of dynamic mosaic effects. CR Categories: I.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling; I.3.3 [Computer Graphics]: Picture/Image Generation. Additional

554 citations

Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Image processing

229.9K papers, 3.5M citations

82% related
Feature extraction

111.8K papers, 2.1M citations

81% related
Image segmentation

79.6K papers, 1.8M citations

81% related
Feature (computer vision)

128.2K papers, 1.7M citations

80% related
Convolutional neural network

74.7K papers, 2M citations

80% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
2021155
2020216
2019305
2018287
2017275