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Linear particle accelerator

About: Linear particle accelerator is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 6937 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 56366 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Linac & linear accelerator.


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Book
01 Oct 1993
Abstract: Tools We Need.- Of Fields and Forces.- Particle Dynamics in Electromagnetic Fields.- Electromagnetic Fields.- Beam Dynamics.- Single Particle Dynamics.- Particle Beams and Phase Space.- Longitudinal Beam Dynamics.- Periodic Focusing Systems.- Beam Parameters.- Particle Beam Parameters.- Vlasov and Fokker-Planck Equations.- Equilibrium Particle Distribution.- Beam Emittance and Lattice Design.- Perturbations.- Perturbations in Beam Dynamics.- Hamiltonian Resonance Theory.- Hamiltonian Nonlinear Beam Dynamics.- Acceleration.- Charged Particle Acceleration.- Beam-Cavity Interaction.- Coupled Motion.- Dynamics of Coupled Motion.- Intense Beams.- Statistical and Collective Effects.- Wake Fields and Instabilities.- Synchrotron Radiation.- Fundamental Processes.- Overview of Synchrotron Radiation.- Theory of Synchrotron Radiation.- Insertion Device Radiation.- Free Electron Lasers.

2,543 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Jul 2004-Nature
TL;DR: A laser accelerator that produces electron beams with an energy spread of a few per cent, low emittance and increased energy (more than 109 electrons above 80 MeV) and opens the way for compact and tunable high-brightness sources of electrons and radiation.
Abstract: Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (the wakefield) driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV m-1 (refs 1–3) These fields are thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators4,5 as compact next-generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low-energy beams with 100 per cent electron energy spread1,2,3, which limits potential applications Here we demonstrate a laser accelerator that produces electron beams with an energy spread of a few per cent, low emittance and increased energy (more than 109 electrons above 80 MeV) Our technique involves the use of a preformed plasma density channel to guide a relativistically intense laser, resulting in a longer propagation distance The results open the way for compact and tunable high-brightness sources of electrons and radiation

1,641 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Feb 2007-Nature
TL;DR: An energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42‬GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.
Abstract: The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of approximately 52 GV m(-1). This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a metre for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

592 citations

MonographDOI
23 Jan 2008
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. RF Accelerator in Linacs 3. Periodic Accelerating Structures 4. Standard Linac Structures 5. Microwave Topics for Linacs 6. Longitudinal Particle Dynamics 7. Transverse Particle Dynamics 8. Radiofrequency Quadrupole Linac 9. Multiparticle Dynamics with Space Charge 10. Beam Loading 11. Wakefields 12. Special Linacs and Special Techniques 13. Superconducting Linacs

549 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
07 Nov 2013-Nature
TL;DR: The results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012 eV) scale.
Abstract: Acceleration of relativistic electrons in a dielectric laser accelerator at high electric field gradients is reported, setting the stage for the development of future multi-staged accelerators of this type. Conventional particle accelerators, based on radio-frequency technology, are large-scale installations that are expensive to run. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) offer an attractive alternative, as they are able to support much larger accelerating fields than current accelerators, while being compact, economical and simple to manufacture using lithographic techniques. This paper presents the first experimental demonstration of a DLA capable of sustained, high-gradient (beyond 250 MeV m−1) acceleration of relativistic electrons. The results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems, which would enable compact table-top MeV–GeV-scale accelerators. Applications include security scanners and medical therapy, X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices. The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today’s accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently1,2,3,4, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250 MeV m−1) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563 ± 104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10–30 MeV m−1, and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6 MeV m−1 (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV–GeV (106–109 eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012 eV) scale.

380 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202199
2020124
2019161
2018196
2017183
2016205