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Magnetic levitation

About: Magnetic levitation is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 7666 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 65355 citation(s). The topic is also known as: maglev & magnetic suspension.

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JSV.2008.06.011
Brian P. Mann1, Neil D. Sims2Institutions (2)
Abstract: This paper investigates the design and analysis of a novel energy harvesting device that uses magnetic levitation to produce an oscillator with a tunable resonance. The governing equations for the mechanical and electrical domains are derived to show the designed system reduces to the form of a Duffing oscillator under both static and dynamic loads. Thus, nonlinear analyses are required to investigate the energy harvesting potential of this prototypical nonlinear system. Theoretical investigations are followed by a series of experimental tests that validate the response predictions. The motivating hypothesis for the current work was that nonlinear phenomenon could be exploited to improve the effectiveness of energy harvesting devices.

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  • Table 1 Identified model parameters for the experimental system that were applied during theoretical studies. Reported relationships are for do = 36.3 (mm).
    Table 1 Identified model parameters for the experimental system that were applied during theoretical studies. Reported relationships are for do = 36.3 (mm).
  • Fig. 2. Graph (a) shows the force-displacment relationship for do = 37.3 (mm) and the coefficients of Table 1. Graph (b) illustrates a change in the linear resonances as a function of the magnet spacing.
    Fig. 2. Graph (a) shows the force-displacment relationship for do = 37.3 (mm) and the coefficients of Table 1. Graph (b) illustrates a change in the linear resonances as a function of the magnet spacing.
  • Fig. 1. A schematic diagram of the magnetic levitation system with threaded supports to position the outer magnets is shown in (a). Graph (b) shows the restoring force plotted as a function of the separation distance between the center and bottom magnet.
    Fig. 1. A schematic diagram of the magnetic levitation system with threaded supports to position the outer magnets is shown in (a). Graph (b) shows the restoring force plotted as a function of the separation distance between the center and bottom magnet.
  • Fig. 6. Frequency response curves of the relative velocity for the magnetic levitation system and a linear oscillator with parameters γ = 0.036 and ωn = 49.87 (rad/s) which give matching peak responses for F1 = 0.1 (m/s2), graph (a). The remaining graphs are for relatively larger excitation amplitudes: (b) F1 = 2 (m/s2) and (c) F1 = 4 (m/s2). Solid line denotes stable periodic solutions and a dashed line represents unstable periodic solutions.
    Fig. 6. Frequency response curves of the relative velocity for the magnetic levitation system and a linear oscillator with parameters γ = 0.036 and ωn = 49.87 (rad/s) which give matching peak responses for F1 = 0.1 (m/s2), graph (a). The remaining graphs are for relatively larger excitation amplitudes: (b) F1 = 2 (m/s2) and (c) F1 = 4 (m/s2). Solid line denotes stable periodic solutions and a dashed line represents unstable periodic solutions.
  • Fig. 5. Relative velocity response for different excitation amplitudes: (a) F1 = 0.1 (m/s2), (b) F1 = 2 (m/s2), and (c) F1 = 4 (m/s2). With the exception of the damping ratio, set to ζ = 0.09, the experimentally identified parameters from Table 1 were used. Solid line denotes stable periodic solutions and a dashed line represents unstable periodic solutions.
    Fig. 5. Relative velocity response for different excitation amplitudes: (a) F1 = 0.1 (m/s2), (b) F1 = 2 (m/s2), and (c) F1 = 4 (m/s2). With the exception of the damping ratio, set to ζ = 0.09, the experimentally identified parameters from Table 1 were used. Solid line denotes stable periodic solutions and a dashed line represents unstable periodic solutions.
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Topics: Nonlinear system (55%), Magnetic levitation (54%), Nonlinear Oscillations (52%) ...read more

837 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1109/TMAG.2006.875842
Hyung-Woo Lee, Ki-Chan Kim1, Ju Lee1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper reviews and summarizes Maglev train technologies from an electrical engineering point of view and assimilates the results of works over the past three decades carried out all over the world. Many researches and developments concerning the Maglev train have been accomplished; however, they are not always easy to understand. The purpose of this paper is to make the Maglev train technologies clear at a glance. Included are general understandings, technologies, and worldwide practical projects. Further research needs are also addressed.

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Topics: Maglev (64%), Electromagnetic propulsion (59%), Magnetic levitation (55%)

487 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0921-4534(02)01548-4
Jiasu Wang1, Suyu Wang1, Youwen Zeng1, Haiyu Huang1  +20 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: The first man-loading high temperature superconducting Maglev test vehicle in the world is reported. This vehicle was first tested successfully on December 31, 2000 in the Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, China. Heretofore over 17,000 passengers took the vehicle, and it operates very well from beginning to now. The function of suspension is separated from one of propulsion. The high temperature superconducting Maglev provides inherent stable forces both in the levitation and in the guidance direction. The vehicle is 3.5 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 0.8 m high. When five people stand on vehicle and the total weight is 530 kg, the net levitation gap is more than 20 mm. The whole vehicle system includes three parts, vehicle body, guideway and controlling system. The high temperature superconducting Maglev equipment on board is the most important for the system. The onboard superconductors are melt-textured YBaCuO bulks. The superconductors are fixed on the bottom of liquid nitrogen vessels and cooled by liquid nitrogen. The guideway consists of two parallel permanent magnetic tracks, whose surface concentrating magnetic field is up to 1.2 T. The guideway is 15.5 m long.

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Topics: Maglev (60%), Magnetic levitation (57%), Levitation (55%) ...read more

382 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1088/0953-2048/25/1/014007
Abstract: This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS–FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN2. More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

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Topics: Magnetic bearing (62%), Flywheel (61%), Flywheel energy storage (61%) ...read more

330 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0141-6359(98)00009-9
Won-jong Kim1, David L. Trumper2Institutions (2)
Abstract: In this paper, we present a high-precision magnetic levitation (maglev) stage for photolithography in semiconductor manufacturing. This stage is the world’s first maglev stage that provides fine six-degree-of-freedom motion controls and realizes large (50 mm × 50 mm) planar motions with only a single magnetically levitated moving part. The key element of this stage is a linear motor capable of providing forces in both suspension and translation without contact. The advantage of such a stage is that the mechanical design is far simpler than competing conventional approaches and, thus, promises faster dynamic response and higher mechanical reliability. The stage operates with a positioning noise as low as 5 nm rms in x and y , and acceleration capabilities in excess of 1 g (10 m/s 2 ). We demonstrate the utility of this stage for next-generation photolithography or in other high-precision motion control applications.

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Topics: Magnetic levitation (58%), Electromagnetic suspension (56%), Linear motor (53%) ...read more

267 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20226
2021215
2020393
2019423
2018412
2017452

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Jun Zheng

78 papers, 1K citations

Zigang Deng

68 papers, 627 citations

Jiasu Wang

50 papers, 1.1K citations

Suyu Wang

48 papers, 1.1K citations

Guangtong Ma

34 papers, 511 citations

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