scispace - formally typeset
Topic

Malayalam

About: Malayalam is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 783 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 4655 citation(s). The topic is also known as: ml & Malayalam language.
Papers
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2001-Studia Linguistica
TL;DR: It is shown that postulating a Focus Phrase above vP enables us to explain such diverse phenomena as the Malayalam question word's position contiguous to V, the ‘remnant’ in English pseudogapping, the clause-final ‘floated’ focus marker in English, and the position of the “cleft focus” in English andMalayalam clefts.
Abstract: It is shown that postulating a Focus Phrase above vP enables us to explain such diverse phenomena as the Malayalam question word's position contiguous to V, the ‘remnant’ in English pseudogapping, the clause-final ‘floated’ focus marker in English, and the position of the ‘cleft focus’ in English and Malayalam clefts. Assuming a Kaynean view of the underlying structure of SOV languages, we argue that the ‘canonical’ positions to which the verb's internal arguments are moved in these languages are above this Focus Phrase. Postulating an iterable Topic Phrase above the Focus Phrase (and above the ‘canonical’ positions in SOV languages) enables us to account for the definiteness/specificity constraints on clause-internal scrambling in Malayalam, German and Dutch, and on object shift in Scandinavian. Finally, it is shown that all the functions attributed to an ‘outer’ Spec position of vP are better fulfilled by the Topic/Focus positions above vP that we postulated.

158 citations


Patent
12 Apr 2002-
Abstract: A system and method for writing Indian languages using the English writing scheme is provided that includes specifying a script using the English alphabet to represent the various characters and character combinations in various Indian languages. The specified script follows the writing conventions of English. This script is based on how the Indian languages are spoken and rules are specified to facilitate mapping the sounds represented in English characters to the native language in its written form. This common method is intended for writing Hindi and related languages, such as Sanskrit, Marathi, and Gujarathi, and Bengali and somewhat distant, but closely related Dravidian languages, such as Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada, and Telegu.

147 citations


Proceedings Article
07 Jun 2012-
TL;DR: A collection of parallel corpora between English and six languages from the Indian subcontinent, which are low-resource, under-studied, and exhibit linguistic phenomena that are difficult for machine translation research are built.
Abstract: Recent work has established the efficacy of Amazon's Mechanical Turk for constructing parallel corpora for machine translation research. We apply this to building a collection of parallel corpora between English and six languages from the Indian subcontinent: Bengali, Hindi, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, and Urdu. These languages are low-resource, under-studied, and exhibit linguistic phenomena that are difficult for machine translation. We conduct a variety of baseline experiments and analysis, and release the data to the community.

123 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Various feature extraction and classification techniques associated with the offline handwriting recognition of the regional scripts are discussed in this survey, which will serve as a compendium not only for researchers in India, but also for policymakers and practitioners in India.
Abstract: Offline handwriting recognition in Indian regional scripts is an interesting area of research as almost 460 million people in India use regional scripts. The nine major Indian regional scripts are Bangla (for Bengali and Assamese languages), Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Gurumukhi (for Punjabi language), Tamil, Telugu, and Nastaliq (for Urdu language). A state-of-the-art survey about the techniques available in the area of offline handwriting recognition (OHR) in Indian regional scripts will be of a great aid to the researchers in the subcontinent and hence a sincere attempt is made in this article to discuss the advancements reported in this regard during the last few decades. The survey is organized into different sections. A brief introduction is given initially about automatic recognition of handwriting and official regional scripts in India. The nine regional scripts are then categorized into four subgroups based on their similarity and evolution information. The first group contains Bangla, Oriya, Gujarati and Gurumukhi scripts. The second group contains Kannada and Telugu scripts and the third group contains Tamil and Malayalam scripts. The fourth group contains only Nastaliq script (Perso-Arabic script for Urdu), which is not an Indo-Aryan script. Various feature extraction and classification techniques associated with the offline handwriting recognition of the regional scripts are discussed in this survey. As it is important to identify the script before the recognition step, a section is dedicated to handwritten script identification techniques. A benchmarking database is very important for any pattern recognition related research. The details of the datasets available in different Indian regional scripts are also mentioned in the article. A separate section is dedicated to the observations made, future scope, and existing difficulties related to handwriting recognition in Indian regional scripts. We hope that this survey will serve as a compendium not only for researchers in India, but also for policymakers and practitioners in India. It will also help to accomplish a target of bringing the researchers working on different Indian scripts together. Looking at the recent developments in OHR of Indian regional scripts, this article will provide a better platform for future research activities.

117 citations


Book
01 Jan 2001-
Abstract: PART I: INTRODUCTION: ANCIENT INDIAN MATERIALS Vyasa's Mahabharata : Sikhandin's Sex Change (Sanskrit) Manikantha Jataka (Pali) Vishnu Sharma's Panchatantra (Sanskrit) Vatsyayana's Kamasutra (Sanskrit) PART II: INTRODUCTION: MEDIEVAL MATERIALS IN THE SANSKRATIC TRADITION Bhagvata Purana : The Embrace of Shiva and Vishnu (Sanskrit) Skanda Purana : Sumedha and Somavan (Sanskrit) Shiva Purana : The Birth of Kartikeya (Sanskrit) Shiva Purana : The Birth of Ganesha (Sanskrit) Somadeva Bhatta's Kathasaritsagara : Kalingasena and Somaprabha (Sanskrit) Padma Purana : Arjuni (Sanskrit) Ayyappa and Vavar: Celibate Friends Krittivasa Ramayana : The Birth of Bhagiratha (Bengali) Jagannath Das (Oriya) PART III: INTRODUCTION: MEDIEVAL MATERIALS IN THE PERSO-URDU TRADITION Amir Khusro (Persian and Hindvi) Ziauddin Barani: The Khaljis in Love (Persian) The Mirror of Secrets : 'Akhi' Jamshed Rajgiri (Persian) Baburnama (Turkish) 'Mutribi' Samarqandi: The Fair and the Dark Boys (Persian) Haqiqat al-Fuqara : Poetic Biography of "Madho Lal" Hussayn (Persian), with Hussayn's poems (Punjabi) Sarmad (Persian) Muhammad Akram 'Ghanimat' Kanjohi: Love's Sorcery (Persian) 'Abru': Advice to a Beloved (Urdu) Siraj Aurangabadi: The Garden of Delusion (Urdu) Mir Abdul Hai'Taban': The Lover Who Looked like a Beloved (Urdu) Dargah Quli Khan: Portrait of a City (Persian) Mir Taqi 'Mir': Autobiography and Poems (Persian and Urdu) PART IV: INTRODUCTION: MODERN INDIAN MATERIALS Nazir Akbaraadi (Urdu) Rekhti Poetry: Love Between Women (Urdu) Shri Ramakrishna Paramahansa (Bengali) Bankim Chandra Chatterjee: Indira (Bengali) The Kamasutra in the Twentieth Century Gopabandhu Das: Poems Written in Prison (Oriya) The New Homophobia: Ugra's Chocolate (Hindi) M. K. Gandhi: Reply to a Query (English) Amrita Sher-Gil: Letters (English) Hakim Muhammad Yusuf Hasan: Do Shiza (Urdu) 'Firaq' Gorakhpuri: Poet vs. 'Critic' (Urdu) Sharada: 'Farewell' (Hindi) Suryakant Tripathi 'Nirala': Kulli Bhaat (Hindi) Josh Malihabadi: 'There Will Never Be Another Like You' (Urdu) Ismat Chughatai: 'Tehri Lakeer' (Urdu) Rajendra Yadav: 'Waiting' (Hindi) Bhupen Khakhar: A Story (Gujarati) Kishori Charan Das: 'Sarama's Romjance' (Oriya) Kewal Sood: The Hen Coop (Hindi) Shobhana Siddique: 'Full to the Brim' (Hindi) V.T. Nandakumar: Two Girls (Malayalam) Vijay Dan Detha: 'A Double Life' (Jajasthani) Vikram Seth: Poems (English) Nirmala Deshpande: 'Mary Had a Little Lamb' (Marathi) Vijay Tendulkar: Mitra's Story (Marathi) Sunil Gangopadhyay: Those Days (Bengali) H.S. Shivaprakash: Shakespeare Dreamship (Kannada) Inez Vere Dullas: Poems (English) Hoshang Merchant: Poems for Vivan (English) Ambia: 'One Person and Another' (Tamil)

79 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Hindi

2.8K papers, 24.8K citations

78% related
Bengali

2.1K papers, 16.5K citations

75% related
Lexicon

12.4K papers, 347.6K citations

75% related
Urdu

1K papers, 7.9K citations

74% related
Vocabulary

44.6K papers, 941.5K citations

71% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20222
202197
202068
201935
201847
201750

Top Attributes

Show by:

Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Elizabeth Sherly

14 papers, 117 citations

Sumam Mary Idicula

13 papers, 113 citations

P. C. Reghu Raj

8 papers, 24 citations

Sobha Lalitha Devi

7 papers, 15 citations

G. Santhosh Kumar

7 papers, 38 citations