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Topic

Meaningful learning

About: Meaningful learning is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 4247 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 86610 citation(s).


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conclusion is that blended learning is consistent with the values of traditional higher education institutions and has the proven potential to enhance both the effectiveness and efficiency of meaningful learning experiences.
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a discussion of the transformative potential of blended learning in the context of the challenges facing higher education. Based upon a description of blended learning, its potential to support deep and meaningful learning is discussed. From here, a shift to the need to rethink and restructure the learning experience occurs and its transformative potential is analyzed. Finally, administrative and leadership issues are addressed and the outline of an action plan to implement blended learning approaches is presented. The conclusion is that blended learning is consistent with the values of traditional higher education institutions and has the proven potential to enhance both the effectiveness and efficiency of meaningful learning experiences.

3,066 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The analysis shows that cognitive load is a central consideration in the design of multimedia instruction because it exceeds the learner's available cognitive capacity.
Abstract: First, we propose a theory of multimedia learning based on the assumptions that humans possess separate systems for processing pictorial and verbal material (dual-channel assumption), each channel is limited in the amount of material that can be processed at one time (limited-capacity assumption), and meaningful learning involves cognitive processing including building connections between pictorial and verbal representations (active-processing assumption). Second, based on the cognitive theory of multimedia learning, we examine the concept of cognitive overload in which the learner's intended cognitive processing exceeds the learner's available cognitive capacity. Third, we examine five overload scenarios. For each overload scenario, we offer one or two theory-based suggestions for reducing cognitive load, and we summarize our research results aimed at testing the effectiveness of each suggestion. Overall, our analysis shows that cognitive load is a central consideration in the design of multimedia instru...

3,004 citations

Book
03 Nov 1993
Abstract: I. INTRODUCTION. 1. Introduction to Theories of Learning and Instruction. II. LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR. 2. Radical Behaviorism. III. LEARNING AND COGNITION. 3. Cognitive Information Processing. 4. Meaningful Learning and Schema Theory. 5. Situated Learning. IV. LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT. 6. Cognitive and Knowledge Development. 7. Interactional Theories of Cognitive Development. V. LEARNING AND BIOLOGY. 8. Biological Bases of Learning and Memory. VI. LEARNING AND MOTIVATION. 9. Motivation and Self-Regulation in Learning. VII. LEARNING AND INSTRUCTION. 10. Gagne's Theory of Instruction. 11. Constructivism. VIII. EPILOGUE. 12. Toward a Personal Theory of Learning and Instruction.

1,792 citations

Book
11 Aug 1998
TL;DR: This book addresses how to use very specific types of technology and focuses on how technology can be used as a thinking tool to foster meaningful learning.
Abstract: This book addresses how to use very specific types of technology and focuses on how technology can be used as a thinking tool to foster meaningful learning. The book approaches learning from a constructivist view and relates it to using technology to engage meaningful learning.Within each chapter, the book provides different activities and implementation strategies in the "Technique" sections and follow-up questions in the "Things to Think About" sections. Very current uses of technology such as video theater, cybermentoring, creating homepages, and hypermedia are discussed throughout the book.

1,527 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
Abstract: For more than half a century, my students and I have sought to understand why some learners acquire a deep, meaningful understanding of materials studied, whereas others have only a superficial grasp of the information presented. Often the latter kind of student had high school grades and high standardized test scores. What appeared to underlie the differences in these two groups of students was the differences in the way they approached learning of subject matter. Unfortunately, as a graduate student at the University of Minnesota in the 1950’s, the only learning psychology taught was behavioral psychology, and this largely sought to remove meaning from learning experiments, either by using animals, nonsense syllables, paired-word associations, or other material that would not “contaminate” experiments due to the almost idiosyncratic nature of leaner’s meanings of concepts or ideas. I thought then that behavioral psychology had essentially no relevance to human learning of the kind I was interested in. Fortunately for our research group, Ausubel’s assimilation theory of meaningful learning was published in 1963, and this provided a solid theoretical foundation for the work we were interested in doing.

1,501 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20222
2021264
2020304
2019271
2018247
2017282