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Medial axis

About: Medial axis is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1386 publications have been published within this topic receiving 34976 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An efficient three-dimensional (3-D) parallel thinning algorithm for extracting both the medial surfaces and the medial axes of a 3-D object and its use in defect analysis of objects produced by casting and forging is discussed.

1,357 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 May 2001
TL;DR: A careful design of a key subroutine which labels parts of the MAT as inside or outside of the object, easy in theory but non-trivial in practice is described, which leads to a simple algorithm with theoretical guarantees comparable to those of other surface reconstruction and medial axis approximation algorithms.
Abstract: The power crust is a construction which takes a sample of points from the surface of a three-dimensional object and produces a surface mesh and an approximate medial axis. The approach is to first approximate the medial axis transform (MAT) of the object. We then use an inverse transform to produce the surface representation from the MAT.This idea leads to a simple algorithm with theoretical guarantees comparable to those of other surface reconstruction and medial axis approximation algorithms. It also comes with a guarantee that does not depend in any way on the quality of the input point sample. Any input gives an output surface which is the `watertight' boundary of a three-dimensional polyhedral solid: the solid described by the approximate MAT. This unconditional guarantee makes the algorithm quite robust and eliminates the polygonalization, hole-filling or manifold extraction post-processing steps required in previous surface reconstruction algorithms.In this paper, we use the theory to develop a power crust implementation which is indeed robust for realistic and even difficult samples. We describe the careful design of a key subroutine which labels parts of the MAT as inside or outside of the object, easy in theory but non-trivial in practice. We find that we can handle areas in which the input sampling is scanty or noisy by simply discarding the unreliable parts of the MAT approximation. We demonstrate good empirical results on inputs including models with sharp corners, sparse and unevenly distributed point samples, holes, and noise, both natural and synthetic.We also demonstrate some simple extensions: intentionally leaving holes where there is no data, producing approximate offset surfaces, and simplifying the approximate MAT in a principled way to preserve stable features.

844 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The method of principal geodesic analysis is developed, a generalization of principal component analysis to the manifold setting and demonstrated its use in describing the variability of medially-defined anatomical objects.
Abstract: A primary goal of statistical shape analysis is to describe the variability of a population of geometric objects. A standard technique for computing such descriptions is principal component analysis. However, principal component analysis is limited in that it only works for data lying in a Euclidean vector space. While this is certainly sufficient for geometric models that are parameterized by a set of landmarks or a dense collection of boundary points, it does not handle more complex representations of shape. We have been developing representations of geometry based on the medial axis description or m-rep. While the medial representation provides a rich language for variability in terms of bending, twisting, and widening, the medial parameters are not elements of a Euclidean vector space. They are in fact elements of a nonlinear Riemannian symmetric space. In this paper, we develop the method of principal geodesic analysis, a generalization of principal component analysis to the manifold setting. We demonstrate its use in describing the variability of medially-defined anatomical objects. Results of applying this framework on a population of hippocampi in a schizophrenia study are presented.

840 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the problem of approximating the medial axis transform of a 3D object with a finite union of balls and define a new piecewise linear approximation to the object surface, which they call the power crust.
Abstract: The medial axis transform (or MAT) is a representation of an object as an infinite union of balls. We consider approximating the MAT of a three-dimensional object, and its complement, with a finite union of balls. Using this approximate MAT we define a new piecewise-linear approximation to the object surface, which we call the power crust. We assume that we are given as input a sufficiently dense sample of points from the object surface. We select a subset of the Voronoi balls of the sample, the polar balls, as the union of balls representation. We bound the geometric error of the union, and of the corresponding power crust, and show that both representations are topologically correct as well. Thus, our results provide a new algorithm for surface reconstruction from sample points. By construction, the power crust is always the boundary of a polyhedral solid, so we avoid the polygonization, hole-filling or manifold extraction steps used in previous algorithms. The union of balls representation and the power crust have corresponding piecewise-linear dual representations, which in some sense approximate the medial axis. We show a geometric relationship between these duals and the medial axis by proving that, as the sampling density goes to infinity, the set of poles, the centers of the polar balls, converges to the medial axis.

570 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1999
TL;DR: A new approach for computing generalized 2D and 3D Voronoi diagrams using interpolation-based polygon rasterization hardware is presented and the application of this algorithm to fast motion planning in static and dynamic environments, selection in complex user-interfaces, and creation of dynamic mosaic effects is demonstrated.
Abstract: We present a new approach for computing generalized 2D and 3D Voronoi diagrams using interpolation-based polygon rasterization hardware. We compute a discrete Voronoi diagram by rendering a three dimensional distance mesh for each Voronoi site. The polygonal mesh is a bounded-error approximation of a (possibly) non-linear function of the distance between a site and a 2D planar grid of sample points. For each sample point, we compute the closest site and the distance to that site using polygon scan-conversion and the Z-buffer depth comparison. We construct distance meshes for points, line segments, polygons, polyhedra, curves, and curved surfaces in 2D and 3D. We generalize to weighted and farthest-site Voronoi diagrams, and present efficient techniques for computing the Voronoi boundaries, Voronoi neighbors, and the Delaunay triangulation of points. We also show how to adaptively refine the solution through a simple windowing operation. The algorithm has been implemented on SGI workstations and PCs using OpenGL, and applied to complex datasets. We demonstrate the application of our algorithm to fast motion planning in static and dynamic environments, selection in complex user-interfaces, and creation of dynamic mosaic effects. CR Categories: I.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling; I.3.3 [Computer Graphics]: Picture/Image Generation. Additional

559 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20238
202221
202125
202037
201933
201829