scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Methane sulfonate

About: Methane sulfonate is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1405 publications have been published within this topic receiving 31159 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1984
TL;DR: From the distribution of the allele frequencies and the rate of discovery of new loci, it was estimated that the 61 loci represent the majority of embryonic lethal loci on the second chromosome yielding phenotypes recognizable in the larval cuticle.
Abstract: In a search for embryonic lethal mutants on the second chromosome ofDrosophila melanogaster, 5764 balanced lines isogenic for an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)-treatedcn bw sp chromosome were established. Of these lines, 4217 carried one or more newly induced lethal mutations corresponding to a total of 7600 lethal hits. Eggs were collected from lethal-bearing lines and unhatched embryos from the lines in which 25% or more of the embryos did not hatch (2843 lines) were dechorionated, fixed, cleared and scored under the compound microscope for abnormalities of the larval cuticle. A total of 272 mutants were isolated with phenotypes unequivocally distinguishable from wild-type embryos on the basis of the cuticular pattern. In complementation tests performed between mutants with similar phenotype, 48 loci were identified by more than one allele, the average being 5.4 alleles per locus. Complementation of all other mutants was shown by 13 mutants. Members of the complementation groups were mapped by recombination analysis. No clustering of loci with similar phenotypes was apparent. From the distribution of the allele frequencies and the rate of discovery of new loci, it was estimated that the 61 loci represent the majority of embryonic lethal loci on the second chromosome yielding phenotypes recognizable in the larval cuticle.

1,432 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
13 Dec 1999-Oncogene
TL;DR: The nature of p53 modifications, the enzymes that bring them about, and how changes in p53 modification lead to p53 activation are discussed are discussed.
Abstract: Activation of p53 can occur in response to a number of cellular stresses, including DNA damage, hypoxia and nucleotide deprivation. Several forms of DNA damage have been shown to activate p53, including those generated by ionising radiation (IR), radio-mimetic drugs, ultraviolet light (UV) and chemicals such as methyl methane sulfonate (MMS). Under normal conditions, p53 levels are maintained at a low state by virtue of the extremely short-half life of the polypeptide. In addition to this, p53 normally exists in an largely inactive state that is relatively inefficient at binding to DNA and activating transcription. Activation of p53 in response to DNA damage is associated with a rapid increase in its levels and with an increased ability of p53 to bind DNA and mediate transcriptional activation. This then leads to the activation of a number of genes whose products trigger cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, or DNA repair. Recent work has suggested that this regulation is brought about largely through DNA damage triggering a series of phosphorylation, de-phosphorylation and acetylation events on the p53 polypeptide. Here, we discuss the nature of these modifications, the enzymes that bring them about, and how changes in p53 modification lead to p53 activation.

945 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is reported that a member of the protein phosphatase type 2C family, Wip1, has a role in down‐regulating p38‐p53 signaling during the recovery phase of the damaged cells.
Abstract: The stress-responsive p38 MAPK, when activated by genotoxic stresses such as UV radiation, enhances p53 activity by phosphorylation and leads to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Here we report that a member of the protein phosphatase type 2C family, Wip1, has a role in down-regulating p38-p53 signaling during the recovery phase of the damaged cells. Wip1 was originally identified as a gene whose expression is induced following γ or UV radiation in a p53-dependent manner. We found that Wip1 is also inducible by other environmental stresses, such as anisomycin, H2O2 and methyl methane sulfonate. UV-induction of Wip1 requires p38 activity in addition to the wild-type p53. Wip1 selectively inactivates p38 by specific dephosphorylation of its conserved threonine residue. Furthermore, Wip1 expression attenuates UV-induced p53 phosphorylation at Ser33 and Ser46, residues previously reported to be phosphorylated by p38. Wip1 expression also suppresses both p53-mediated transcription and apoptosis in response to UV radiation. These results suggest that p53-dependent expression of Wip1 mediates a negative feedback regulation of p38-p53 signaling and contributes to suppression of the UV-induced apoptosis.

429 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Both mu and delta receptor agonist appear capable of increasing ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations through selective actions on their preferred class of opioid receptors in the VTA.
Abstract: In vivo microdialysis was used to assess the involvement of ventral tegmental area (VTA) mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors in modulation of basal extracellular ventral striatal dopamine (DA) and DA-metabolite concentrations. Independent groups of chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats were given VTA microinjections of selective opioid agonists, and extracellular ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations were assayed using HPLC. VTA microinjections of [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4-Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO; a mu agonist) and [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin (DDDPE; a delta agonist) each caused dose-orderly increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. The effective concentrations of DPDPE were 100- to 1000-fold higher than the effective concentrations of DAMGO. VTA microinjections of (trans-(dl)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclo-hexyl]- benzeneacetamide) methane sulfonate hydrate (U-50,488H); a kappa agonist) failed to alter ventral striatal DA concentrations at any dose tested, but subsequent systemic injections significantly decreased DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. Pretreatment with VTA microinjections of 17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-dehydro-4,5-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxy-6,7,2',3'- indolmorphinan hydrochloride (naltrindole; a delta antagonist) (delta antagonist) antagonized VTA DPDPE-mediated increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations but failed to antagonize VTA DAMGO-mediated increases. Pretreatment with D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP; a mu antagonist) antagonized VTA DAMGO-mediated increases but failed to antagonize VTA DPDPE-mediated increases. Thus both mu and delta receptor agonist appear capable of increasing ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations through selective actions on their preferred class of opioid receptors in the VTA. The increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations that are seen after systemic treatment with kappa opioid agonists appear not to involve VTA opioid receptors.

385 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An additional complementation study revealed that the two NBS-LRR-type R genes, SasR GA4 and SasRGA5, that are located next to each other and oriented in the opposite direction are necessary for Pia function.
Abstract: The Oryza sativa (rice) resistance gene Pia confers resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae carrying the AVR-Pia avirulence gene To clone Pia, we employed a multifaceted genomics approach First, we selected 12 R-gene analog (RGA) genes encoding nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeats (NBS-LRRs) proteins from a region on chromosome 11 that shows linkage to Pia By using seven rice accessions, we examined the association between Pia phenotypes and DNA polymorphisms in the 10 genes, which revealed three genes (Os11gRGA3-Os11gRGA5) exhibiting a perfect association with the Pia phenotypes We also screened ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)-treated mutant lines of the rice cultivar 'Sasanishiki' harboring Pia, and isolated two mutants that lost the Pia phenotype DNA sequencing of Os11gRGA3-Os11gRGA5 from the two mutant lines identified independent mutations of major effects in Os11gRGA4 The wild-type 'Sasanishiki' allele of Os11gRGA4 (SasRGA4) complemented Pia function in both mutants, suggesting that SasRGA4 is necessary for Pia function However, when the rice cultivar 'Himenomochi' lacking Pia was transfected with SasRGA4, the Pia phenotype was not recovered An additional complementation study revealed that the two NBS-LRR-type R genes, SasRGA4 and SasRGA5, that are located next to each other and oriented in the opposite direction are necessary for Pia function A population genetics analysis of SasRGA4 and SasRGA5 suggests that the two genes are under long-term balancing selection

299 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
DNA
107.1K papers, 4.7M citations
75% related
Amino acid
124.9K papers, 4M citations
73% related
Gene
211.7K papers, 10.3M citations
73% related
Gene expression
113.3K papers, 5.5M citations
72% related
Cell culture
133.3K papers, 5.3M citations
72% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202317
202233
202141
202046
201964
201863