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Middleware (distributed applications)

About: Middleware (distributed applications) is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 13799 publications have been published within this topic receiving 209964 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1997
TL;DR: The Globus system is intended to achieve a vertically integrated treatment of application, middleware, and net work, an integrated set of higher level services that enable applications to adapt to heteroge neous and dynamically changing metacomputing environ ments.
Abstract: The Globus system is intended to achieve a vertically integrated treatment of application, middleware, and net work. A low-level toolkit provides basic mechanisms such as communication, authentication, network information, and data access. These mechanisms are used to con struct various higher level metacomputing services, such as parallel programming tools and schedulers. The long- term goal is to build an adaptive wide area resource environment AWARE, an integrated set of higher level services that enable applications to adapt to heteroge neous and dynamically changing metacomputing environ ments. Preliminary versions of Globus components were deployed successfully as part of the I-WAY networking experiment.

3,450 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a middleware platform which addresses the issue of selecting Web services for the purpose of their composition in a way that maximizes user satisfaction expressed as utility functions over QoS attributes, while satisfying the constraints set by the user and by the structure of the composite service.
Abstract: The paradigmatic shift from a Web of manual interactions to a Web of programmatic interactions driven by Web services is creating unprecedented opportunities for the formation of online business-to-business (B2B) collaborations. In particular, the creation of value-added services by composition of existing ones is gaining a significant momentum. Since many available Web services provide overlapping or identical functionality, albeit with different quality of service (QoS), a choice needs to be made to determine which services are to participate in a given composite service. This paper presents a middleware platform which addresses the issue of selecting Web services for the purpose of their composition in a way that maximizes user satisfaction expressed as utility functions over QoS attributes, while satisfying the constraints set by the user and by the structure of the composite service. Two selection approaches are described and compared: one based on local (task-level) selection of services and the other based on global allocation of tasks to services using integer programming.

2,872 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2007
TL;DR: Common architecture principles of context-aware systems are presented and a layered conceptual design framework is derived to explain the different elements common to mostcontext-aware architectures.
Abstract: Context-aware systems offer entirely new opportunities for application developers and for end users by gathering context data and adapting systems behaviour accordingly. Especially in combination with mobile devices, these mechanisms are of high value and are used to increase usability tremendously. In this paper, we present common architecture principles of context-aware systems and derive a layered conceptual design framework to explain the different elements common to most context-aware architectures. Based on these design principles, we introduce various existing context-aware systems focusing on context-aware middleware and frameworks, which ease the development of context-aware applications. We discuss various approaches and analyse important aspects in context-aware computing on the basis of the presented systems.

2,036 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: Intended for use in a senior/graduate level distributed systems course or by professionals, this text systematically shows how distributed systems are designed and implemented in real systems.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Andrew Tanenbaum and Maarten van Steen cover the principles, advanced concepts, and technologies of distributed systems in detail, including: communication, replication, fault tolerance, and security. Intended for use in a senior/graduate level distributed systems course or by professionals, this text systematically shows how distributed systems are designed and implemented in real systems. Written in the superb writing style of other Tanenbaum books, the material also features unique accessibility and a wide variety of real-world examples and case studies, such as NFS v4, CORBA, DOM, Jini, and the World Wide Web. FEATURES Detailed coverage of seven key principles. An introductory chapter followed by a chapter devoted to each key principle: communication, processes, naming, synchronization, consistency and replication, fault tolerance, and security, including unique comprehensive coverage of middleware models. Four chapters devoted to state-of-the-art real-world examples of middleware. Covers object-based systems, document-based systems, distributed file systems, and coordination-based systems including CORBA, DCOM, Globe, NFS v4, Coda, the World Wide Web, and Jini. Excellent coverage of timely, advanced, distributed systems topics: Security, payment systems, recent Internet and Web protocols, scalability, and caching and replication. NEW-The Prentice Hall Companion Website for this book contains PowerPoint slides, figures in various file formats, and other teaching aids, and a link to the author's Web site.

2,011 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
18 May 2009
TL;DR: This work presents Eucalyptus -- an open-source software framework for cloud computing that implements what is commonly referred to as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS); systems that give users the ability to run and control entire virtual machine instances deployed across a variety physical resources.
Abstract: Cloud computing systems fundamentally provide access to large pools of data and computational resources through a variety of interfaces similar in spirit to existing grid and HPC resource management and programming systems. These types of systems offer a new programming target for scalable application developers and have gained popularity over the past few years. However, most cloud computing systems in operation today are proprietary, rely upon infrastructure that is invisible to the research community, or are not explicitly designed to be instrumented and modified by systems researchers. In this work, we present Eucalyptus -- an open-source software framework for cloud computing that implements what is commonly referred to as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS); systems that give users the ability to run and control entire virtual machine instances deployed across a variety physical resources. We outline the basic principles of the Eucalyptus design, detail important operational aspects of the system, and discuss architectural trade-offs that we have made in order to allow Eucalyptus to be portable, modular and simple to use on infrastructure commonly found within academic settings. Finally, we provide evidence that Eucalyptus enables users familiar with existing Grid and HPC systems to explore new cloud computing functionality while maintaining access to existing, familiar application development software and Grid middle-ware.

1,962 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023118
2022374
2021181
2020269
2019359
2018373