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Network planning and design

About: Network planning and design is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 12393 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 229776 citation(s). The topic is also known as: network design.


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Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: This book offers a detailed and comprehensive presentation of the basic principles of interconnection network design, clearly illustrating them with numerous examples, chapter exercises, and case studies, allowing a designer to see all the steps of the process from abstract design to concrete implementation.
Abstract: One of the greatest challenges faced by designers of digital systems is optimizing the communication and interconnection between system components. Interconnection networks offer an attractive and economical solution to this communication crisis and are fast becoming pervasive in digital systems. Current trends suggest that this communication bottleneck will be even more problematic when designing future generations of machines. Consequently, the anatomy of an interconnection network router and science of interconnection network design will only grow in importance in the coming years. This book offers a detailed and comprehensive presentation of the basic principles of interconnection network design, clearly illustrating them with numerous examples, chapter exercises, and case studies. It incorporates hardware-level descriptions of concepts, allowing a designer to see all the steps of the process from abstract design to concrete implementation. ·Case studies throughout the book draw on extensive author experience in designing interconnection networks over a period of more than twenty years, providing real world examples of what works, and what doesn't. ·Tightly couples concepts with implementation costs to facilitate a deeper understanding of the tradeoffs in the design of a practical network. ·A set of examples and exercises in every chapter help the reader to fully understand all the implications of every design decision. Table of Contents Chapter 1 Introduction to Interconnection Networks 1.1 Three Questions About Interconnection Networks 1.2 Uses of Interconnection Networks 1.3 Network Basics 1.4 History 1.5 Organization of this Book Chapter 2 A Simple Interconnection Network 2.1 Network Specifications and Constraints 2.2 Topology 2.3 Routing 2.4 Flow Control 2.5 Router Design 2.6 Performance Analysis 2.7 Exercises Chapter 3 Topology Basics 3.1 Nomenclature 3.2 Traffic Patterns 3.3 Performance 3.4 Packaging Cost 3.5 Case Study: The SGI Origin 2000 3.6 Bibliographic Notes 3.7 Exercises Chapter 4 Butterfly Networks 4.1 The Structure of Butterfly Networks 4.2 Isomorphic Butterflies 4.3 Performance and Packaging Cost 4.4 Path Diversity and Extra Stages 4.5 Case Study: The BBN Butterfly 4.6 Bibliographic Notes 4.7 Exercises Chapter 5 Torus Networks 5.1 The Structure of Torus Networks 5.2 Performance 5.3 Building Mesh and Torus Networks 5.4 Express Cubes 5.5 Case Study: The MIT J-Machine 5.6 Bibliographic Notes 5.7 Exercises Chapter 6 Non-Blocking Networks 6.1 Non-Blocking vs. Non-Interfering Networks 6.2 Crossbar Networks 6.3 Clos Networks 6.4 Benes Networks 6.5 Sorting Networks 6.6 Case Study: The Velio VC2002 (Zeus) Grooming Switch 6.7 Bibliographic Notes 6.8 Exercises Chapter 7 Slicing and Dicing 7.1 Concentrators and Distributors 7.2 Slicing and Dicing 7.3 Slicing Multistage Networks 7.4 Case Study: Bit Slicing in the Tiny Tera 7.5 Bibliographic Notes 7.6 Exercises Chapter 8 Routing Basics 8.1 A Routing Example 8.2 Taxonomy of Routing Algorithms 8.3 The Routing Relation 8.4 Deterministic Routing 8.5 Case Study: Dimension-Order Routing in the Cray T3D 8.6 Bibliographic Notes 8.7 Exercises Chapter 9 Oblivious Routing 9.1 Valiant's Randomized Routing Algorithm 9.2 Minimal Oblivious Routing 9.3 Load-Balanced Oblivious Routing 9.4 Analysis of Oblivious Routing 9.5 Case Study: Oblivious Routing in the Avici Terabit Switch Router(TSR) 9.6 Bibliographic Notes 9.7 Exercises Chapter 10 Adaptive Routing 10.1 Adaptive Routing Basics 10.2 Minimal Adaptive Routing 10.3 Fully Adaptive Routing 10.4 Load-Balanced Adaptive Routing 10.5 Search-Based Routing 10.6 Case Study: Adaptive Routing in the Thinking Machines CM-5 10.7 Bibliographic Notes 10.8 Exercises Chapter 11 Routing Mechanics 11.1 Table-Based Routing 11.2 Algorithmic Routing 11.3 Case Study: Oblivious Source Routing in the IBM Vulcan Network 11.4 Bibliographic Notes 11.5 Exercises Chapter 12 Flow Control Basics 12.1 Resources and Allocation Units 12.2 Bufferless Flow Control 12.3 Circuit Switching 12.4 Bibliographic Notes 12.5 Exercises Chapter 13 Buffered Flow Control 13.1 Packet-Buffer Flow Control 13.2 Flit-Buffer Flow Control 13.3 Buffer Management and Backpressure 13.4 Flit-Reservation Flow Control 13.5 Bibliographic Notes 13.6 Exercises Chapter 14 Deadlock and Livelock 14.1 Deadlock 14.2 Deadlock Avoidance 14.3 Adaptive Routing 14.4 Deadlock Recovery 14.5 Livelock 14.6 Case Study: Deadlock Avoidance in the Cray T3E 14.7 Bibliographic Notes 14.8 Exercises Chapter 15 Quality of Service 15.1 Service Classes and Service Contracts 15.2 Burstiness and Network Delays 15.3 Implementation of Guaranteed Services 15.4 Implementation of Best-Effort Services 15.5 Separation of Resources 15.6 Case Study: ATM Service Classes 15.7 Case Study: Virtual Networks in the Avici TSR 15.8 Bibliographic Notes 15.9 Exercises Chapter 16 Router Architecture 16.1 Basic Router Architecture 16.2 Stalls 16.3 Closing the Loop with Credits 16.4 Reallocating a Channel 16.5 Speculation and Lookahead 16.6 Flit and Credit Encoding 16.7 Case Study: The Alpha 21364 Router 16.8 Bibliographic Notes 16.9 Exercises Chapter 17 Router Datapath Components 17.1 Input Buffer Organization 17.2 Switches 17.3 Output Organization 17.4 Case Study: The Datapath of the IBM Colony Router 17.5 Bibliographic Notes 17.6 Exercises Chapter 18 Arbitration 18.1 Arbitration Timing 18.2 Fairness 18.3 Fixed Priority Arbiter 18.4 Variable Priority Iterative Arbiters 18.5 Matrix Arbiter 18.6 Queuing Arbiter 18.7 Exercises Chapter 19 Allocation 19.1 Representations 19.2 Exact Algorithms 19.3 Separable Allocators 19.4 Wavefront Allocator 19.5 Incremental vs. Batch Allocation 19.6 Multistage Allocation 19.7 Performance of Allocators 19.8 Case Study: The Tiny Tera Allocator 19.9 Bibliographic Notes 19.10 Exercises Chapter 20 Network Interfaces 20.1 Processor-Network Interface 20.2 Shared-Memory Interface 20.3 Line-Fabric Interface 20.4 Case Study: The MIT M-Machine Network Interface 20.5 Bibliographic Notes 20.6 Exercises Chapter 21 Error Control 411 21.1 Know Thy Enemy: Failure Modes and Fault Models 21.2 The Error Control Process: Detection, Containment, and Recovery 21.3 Link Level Error Control 21.4 Router Error Control 21.5 Network-Level Error Control 21.6 End-to-end Error Control 21.7 Bibliographic Notes 21.8 Exercises Chapter 22 Buses 22.1 Bus Basics 22.2 Bus Arbitration 22.3 High Performance Bus Protocol 22.4 From Buses to Networks 22.5 Case Study: The PCI Bus 22.6 Bibliographic Notes 22.7 Exercises Chapter 23 Performance Analysis 23.1 Measures of Interconnection Network Performance 23.2 Analysis 23.3 Validation 23.4 Case Study: Efficiency and Loss in the BBN Monarch Network 23.5 Bibliographic Notes 23.6 Exercises Chapter 24 Simulation 24.1 Levels of Detail 24.2 Network Workloads 24.3 Simulation Measurements 24.4 Simulator Design 24.5 Bibliographic Notes 24.6 Exercises Chapter 25 Simulation Examples 495 25.1 Routing 25.2 Flow Control Performance 25.3 Fault Tolerance Appendix A Nomenclature Appendix B Glossary Appendix C Network Simulator

3,149 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The research shows that NoC constitutes a unification of current trends of intrachip communication rather than an explicit new alternative.
Abstract: The scaling of microchip technologies has enabled large scale systems-on-chip (SoC). Network-on-chip (NoC) research addresses global communication in SoC, involving (i) a move from computation-centric to communication-centric design and (ii) the implementation of scalable communication structures. This survey presents a perspective on existing NoC research. We define the following abstractions: system, network adapter, network, and link to explain and structure the fundamental concepts. First, research relating to the actual network design is reviewed. Then system level design and modeling are discussed. We also evaluate performance analysis techniques. The research shows that NoC constitutes a unification of current trends of intrachip communication rather than an explicit new alternative.

1,686 citations

Book ChapterDOI
08 Sep 2018
TL;DR: ShuffleNet V2 as discussed by the authors proposes to evaluate the direct metric on the target platform, beyond only considering FLOPs, based on a series of controlled experiments, and derives several practical guidelines for efficient network design.
Abstract: Currently, the neural network architecture design is mostly guided by the indirect metric of computation complexity, i.e., FLOPs. However, the direct metric, e.g., speed, also depends on the other factors such as memory access cost and platform characterics. Thus, this work proposes to evaluate the direct metric on the target platform, beyond only considering FLOPs. Based on a series of controlled experiments, this work derives several practical guidelines for efficient network design. Accordingly, a new architecture is presented, called ShuffleNet V2. Comprehensive ablation experiments verify that our model is the state-of-the-art in terms of speed and accuracy tradeoff.

1,613 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This tutorial paper first reviews the basics of convexity, Lagrange duality, distributed subgradient method, Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel iterations, and implication of different time scales of variable updates, and introduces primal, dual, indirect, partial, and hierarchical decompositions, focusing on network utility maximization problem formulations.
Abstract: A systematic understanding of the decomposability structures in network utility maximization is key to both resource allocation and functionality allocation. It helps us obtain the most appropriate distributed algorithm for a given network resource allocation problem, and quantifies the comparison across architectural alternatives of modularized network design. Decomposition theory naturally provides the mathematical language to build an analytic foundation for the design of modularized and distributed control of networks. In this tutorial paper, we first review the basics of convexity, Lagrange duality, distributed subgradient method, Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel iterations, and implication of different time scales of variable updates. Then, we introduce primal, dual, indirect, partial, and hierarchical decompositions, focusing on network utility maximization problem formulations and the meanings of primal and dual decompositions in terms of network architectures. Finally, we present recent examples on: systematic search for alternative decompositions; decoupling techniques for coupled objective functions; and decoupling techniques for coupled constraint sets that are not readily decomposable

1,602 citations

Patent
12 Aug 1996
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method for designing networks including auditing a network to discover a present network configuration, creating a network design sheet from the discovered network configuration and placing device icons representing intelligent device objects on the design sheet, selecting a media type representing an intelligent media object, and connecting the media type to a first one of the device icons.
Abstract: A method for designing networks including auditing a network to discover a present network configuration, creating a network design sheet from the discovered network configuration, placing device icons representing intelligent device objects on the network design sheet, selecting a media type representing an intelligent media object, and connecting the media type to a first one of the device icons The method further includes validating the connection to the first one of the device icons

1,342 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20229
2021430
2020493
2019570
2018573
2017589