scispace - formally typeset

Topic

Neurodegeneration

About: Neurodegeneration is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 21120 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 1345543 citation(s).


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
28 Aug 1997-Nature
TL;DR: Strong staining of Lewy bodies from idiopathic Parkinson's disease with antibodies for α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein of unknown function which is mutated in some familial cases of the disease, indicates that the LewY bodies from these two diseases may have identical compositions.
Abstract: Lewy bodies, a defining pathological characteristic of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)1,2,3,4, constitute the second most common nerve cell pathology, after the neurofibrillary lesions of Alzheimer's disease. Their formation may cause neurodegeneration, but their biochemical composition is unknown. Neurofilaments and ubiquitin are present5,6,7,8, but it is unclear whether they are major components of the filamentous material of the Lewy body9,10. Here we describe strong staining of Lewy bodies from idiopathic Parkinson's disease with antibodies for α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein of unknown function which is mutated in some familial cases of the disease11. α-Synuclein may be the main component of the Lewy body in Parkinson's disease. We also show staining for α-synuclein of Lewy bodies from DLB, indicating that the Lewy bodies from these two diseases may have identical compositions.

6,100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
19 Oct 2006-Nature
TL;DR: Treatments targeting basic mitochondrial processes, such as energy metabolism or free-radical generation, or specific interactions of disease-related proteins with mitochondria hold great promise in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases.
Abstract: Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondria have a central role in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria are critical regulators of cell death, a key feature of neurodegeneration. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA and oxidative stress both contribute to ageing, which is the greatest risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. In all major examples of these diseases there is strong evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early and acts causally in disease pathogenesis. Moreover, an impressive number of disease-specific proteins interact with mitochondria. Thus, therapies targeting basic mitochondrial processes, such as energy metabolism or free-radical generation, or specific interactions of disease-related proteins with mitochondria, hold great promise.

4,742 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
11 Sep 2003-Neuron
TL;DR: PD models based on the manipulation of PD genes should prove valuable in elucidating important aspects of the disease, such as selective vulnerability of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons to the degenerative process.
Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD) results primarily from the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current PD medications treat symptoms; none halt or retard dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The main obstacle to developing neuroprotective therapies is a limited understanding of the key molecular events that provoke neurodegeneration. The discovery of PD genes has led to the hypothesis that misfolding of proteins and dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are pivotal to PD pathogenesis. Previously implicated culprits in PD neurodegeneration, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, may also act in part by causing the accumulation of misfolded proteins, in addition to producing other deleterious events in dopaminergic neurons. Neurotoxin-based models (particularly MPTP) have been important in elucidating the molecular cascade of cell death in dopaminergic neurons. PD models based on the manipulation of PD genes should prove valuable in elucidating important aspects of the disease, such as selective vulnerability of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons to the degenerative process.

4,390 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings in other neurodegenerative diseases indicate that a broadly similar process of neuronal dysfunction is induced by diffusible oligomers of misfolded proteins.
Abstract: The distinct protein aggregates that are found in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases seem to cause these disorders. Small intermediates - soluble oligomers - in the aggregation process can confer synaptic dysfunction, whereas large, insoluble deposits might function as reservoirs of the bioactive oligomers. These emerging concepts are exemplified by Alzheimer's disease, in which amyloid beta-protein oligomers adversely affect synaptic structure and plasticity. Findings in other neurodegenerative diseases indicate that a broadly similar process of neuronal dysfunction is induced by diffusible oligomers of misfolded proteins.

4,185 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Oct 1993-Science
TL;DR: Two broad mechanisms--oxidative stress and excessive activation of glutamate receptors--are converging and represent sequential as well as interacting processes that provide a final common pathway for cell vulnerability in the brain.
Abstract: There is an increasing amount of experimental evidence that oxidative stress is a causal, or at least an ancillary, factor in the neuropathology of several adult neurodegenerative disorders, as well as in stroke, trauma, and seizures. At the same time, excessive or persistent activation of glutamate-gated ion channels may cause neuronal degeneration in these same conditions. Glutamate and related acidic amino acids are thought to be the major excitatory neurotransmitters in brain and may be utilized by 40 percent of the synapses. Thus, two broad mechanisms--oxidative stress and excessive activation of glutamate receptors--are converging and represent sequential as well as interacting processes that provide a final common pathway for cell vulnerability in the brain. The broad distribution in brain of the processes regulating oxidative stress and mediating glutamatergic neurotransmission may explain the wide range of disorders in which both have been implicated. Yet differential expression of components of the processes in particular neuronal systems may account for selective neurodegeneration in certain disorders.

3,763 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Dopamine

45.7K papers, 2.2M citations

87% related
Programmed cell death

60.5K papers, 3.8M citations

87% related
Mitochondrion

51.5K papers, 3M citations

85% related
Protein kinase A

68.4K papers, 3.9M citations

84% related
MAPK/ERK pathway

43.7K papers, 2M citations

84% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202219
20211,665
20201,601
20191,351
20181,288
20171,295