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Newcastle disease

About: Newcastle disease is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 4311 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 64829 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Newcastle disease (ND), caused by avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1) viruses, is included in List A of the Office International des Epizooties. Historically, ND has been a devastating disease of poultry, and in many countries the disease remains one of the major problems affecting existing or developing poultry industries. Even in countries where ND may be considered to be controlled, an economic burden is still associated with vaccination and/or maintaining strict biosecurity measures. The variable nature of Newcastle disease virus strains in terms of virulence for poultry and the different susceptibilities of the different species of birds mean that for control and trade purposes, ND requires careful definition. Confirmatory diagnosis of ND requires the isolation and characterisation of the virus involved. Assessments of virulence conventionally require in vivo testing. However, in vitro genetic characterisation of viruses is being used increasingly now that the molecular basis of pathogenicity is more fully understood. Control of ND is by prevention of introduction and spread, good biosecurity practices and/or vaccination. Newcastle disease viruses may infect humans, usually causing transient conjunctivitis, but human-to-human spread has never been reported. Eight other serotypes of avian paramyxoviruses are recognised, namely: APMV-2 to APMV-9. Most of these serotypes appear to be present in natural reservoirs of specific feral avian species, although other host species are usually susceptible. Only APMV-2 and APMV-3 viruses have made a significant disease and economic impact on poultry production. Both types of viruses cause respiratory disease and egg production losses which may be severe when exacerbated by other infections or environmental stresses. No reports exist of natural infections of chickens with APMV-3 viruses.

662 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A positive correlation was obtained between the RRT-PCR results and virus isolation for NDV from clinical samples, and a real-time reverse-transcription PCR test was developed to detect avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1) RNA in clinical samples from birds.
Abstract: A real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RRT-PCR) was developed to detect avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1) RNA, also referred to as Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in clinical samples from birds. The assay uses a single-tube protocol with fluorogenic hydrolysis probes. Oligonucleotide primers and probes were designed to detect sequences from a conserved region of the matrix protein (M) gene that recognized a diverse set (n = 44) of APMV-1 isolates. A second primer-probe set was targeted to sequences in the fusion protein (F) gene that code for the cleavage site and detect potentially virulent NDV isolates. A third set, also directed against the M gene, was specific for the North American (N.A.) pre-1960 genotype that includes the common vaccine strains used in commercial poultry in the United States. The APMV-1 M gene, N.A. pre-1960 M gene, and F gene probe sets were capable of detecting approximately 103, 102, and 104 genome copies, respectively, with in vitro-transcribed RNA. Both M gene assays could detect approximately 101 50% egg infective doses (EID50), and the F gene assay could detect approximately 103 EID50. The RRT-PCR test was used to examine clinical samples from chickens experimentally infected with the NDV strain responsible for a recent epizootic in the southwestern United States. Overall, a positive correlation was obtained between the RRT-PCR results and virus isolation for NDV from clinical samples.

386 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that expression of the NDV V protein or the Nipah virus V, W, or C proteins rescues NDV-GFP replication in the face of the transfection-induced IFN response, and that the NDVs could be used to screen proteins expressed from plasmids for the ability to counteract the host cellIFN response.
Abstract: We have generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) that expresses the green fluorescence protein (GFP) in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). This virus is interferon (IFN) sensitive, and pretreatment of cells with chicken alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β) completely blocks viral GFP expression. Prior transfection of plasmid DNA induces an IFN response in CEFs and blocks NDV-GFP replication. However, transfection of known inhibitors of the IFN-α/β system, including the influenza A virus NS1 protein and the Ebola virus VP35 protein, restores NDV-GFP replication. We therefore conclude that the NDV-GFP virus could be used to screen proteins expressed from plasmids for the ability to counteract the host cell IFN response. Using this system, we show that expression of the NDV V protein or the Nipah virus V, W, or C proteins rescues NDV-GFP replication in the face of the transfection-induced IFN response. The V and W proteins of Nipah virus, a highly lethal pathogen in humans, also block activation of an IFN-inducible promoter in primate cells. Interestingly, the amino-terminal region of the Nipah virus V protein, which is identical to the amino terminus of Nipah virus W, is sufficient to exert the IFN-antagonist activity. In contrast, the anti-IFN activity of the NDV V protein appears to be located in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein, a region implicated in the IFN-antagonist activity exhibited by the V proteins of mumps virus and human parainfluenza virus type 2.

339 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: All of the approximately 8,000 species of birds seem to be susceptible to infection with Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs), so efforts are needed to protect birds from these viruses.
Abstract: Newcastle disease (ND) has economic and ecologic impact on pet and free-living as well as on domestic birds. Virtually all of the approximately 8,000 species of birds seem to be susceptible to infection with Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs).

298 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20222
2021106
2020178
2019186
2018163
2017193