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Nitrate

About: Nitrate is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 28263 publications have been published within this topic receiving 840786 citations. The topic is also known as: NO3(-) & [NO3](-).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new automated system for the analysis of nitrate via reduction with a high-pressure cadmium column that automatically eliminates interference from other compounds normally present in urine and other biological fluids is described.

11,238 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A method for simultaneous evaluation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations in a microtiter plate format is developed and S-Nitrosothiols and L-arginine derivatives were found to be potential interfering agents.

3,170 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Pore water profiles of total CO 2, pH, PO 3−4, NO − 3 plus NO − 2, SO 2− 4, S 2−, Fe 2+ and Mn 2+ have been obtained in cores from pelagic sediments of the eastern equatorial Atlantic under waters of moderate to high productivity as mentioned in this paper.

3,045 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this article, Bremner et al. defined the nonexchangeable NHt as the NHt in soil that cannot be replaced by a neutral potassium salt solution (SSSA, 1987), in contrast to NHt which is extractable at room temperature with such a solution.
Abstract: Most soils contain inorganic nitrogen (N) in the form of ammonium (NHt) and nitrate (NO)"). Nitrite (NOz) also may be present, but the amount is usually too small to warrant its determination, except in cases where NHt or NHt-forming fertilizers are applied to neutral or alkaline soils. Several other forms of inorganic N have been proposed as intermediates during microbial transformations of N in soils, including hydroxylamine (NH20H), hyponitrous acid (H2N20 2), and nitramide (NH2N02), but these compounds are thermodynamically unstable and have not been detected in soil. Until the 1950s, inorganic N was believed to account for <2% of total soil N, on the assumption that NHt and NO)" are completely recovered by extracting soil with a neutral salt solution. The validity of this assumption was challenged by the finding that some soils contain NHt in a form that is not extracted by exchange with other cations (e.g., Rodrigues, 1954; Dhariwal & Stevenson, 1958; Stevenson & Dhariwal, 1959; Bremner & Harada, 1959; Bremner, 1959; Schachtschabel, 1960, 1961; Young, 1962), and by estimates that the proportion of soil N in this form can exceed 50% for some subsurface soils (Stevenson & Dhariwal, 1959; Young, 1962). In such cases, NHt is said to be fixed, and fixed NHt has subsequently been defined as the NHt in soil that cannot be replaced by a neutral potassium salt solution (SSSA, 1987), such as 1 or 2 M KCI or 0.5 M K2S04, in contrast to exchangeable NHt, which is extractable at room temperature with such a solution. Existing information indicates that fixed NHt occurs largely, if not entirely, between the layers of 2: I-type clay minerals, particularly vermiculite and illite (hydrous mica), and that fixation results from entrapment of NHt in ditrigonal voids in the exposed surfaces upon contraction of the clay lattice (Nommik & Vahtras, 1982). The term, nonexchangeable NHt, has been used by Bremner (1965) and Keeney and Nelson (1982) in previous editions of this publication as a more precise alternative to fixed NHt. The same term is used in the present treatment, with specific reference to NHt determined by the method described in "Determination of Nonexchangeable Ammonium," which involves digestion with an HF-HCI solution following treatment of the soil with alkaline KOBr to remove exchangeable NHt and labile organic-N compounds.

2,810 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This Review discusses the emerging important biological functions of the nitrate–nitrite–NO pathway, and highlights studies that implicate the therapeutic potential of nitrate and nitrite in conditions such as myocardial infarction, stroke, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and gastric ulceration.
Abstract: The inorganic anions nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) were previously thought to be inert end products of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism However, recent studies show that these supposedly inert anions can be recycled in vivo to form NO, representing an important alternative source of NO to the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway, in particular in hypoxic states This Review discusses the emerging important biological functions of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, and highlights studies that implicate the therapeutic potential of nitrate and nitrite in conditions such as myocardial infarction, stroke, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and gastric ulceration

2,228 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
20231,655
20223,537
20211,051
20201,024
2019968