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Noise (radio)

About: Noise (radio) is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 20818 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 280514 citation(s).

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Journal ArticleDOI
D.K. Shaeffer1, Thomas H. Lee1Institutions (1)
Abstract: A 1.5-GHz low noise amplifier (LNA), intended for use in a global positioning system (GPS) receiver, has been implemented in a standard 0.6-/spl mu/m CMOS process. The amplifier provides a forward gain (S21) of 22 dB with a noise figure of only 3.5 dB while drawing 30 mW from a 1.5 V supply. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the LNA architecture, including a discussion on the effects of induced gate noise in MOS devices.

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1,433 citations


6


Proceedings ArticleDOI
M. Berouti1, Richard Schwartz1, John Makhoul1Institutions (1)
02 Apr 1979-
TL;DR: This paper describes a method for enhancing speech corrupted by broadband noise based on the spectral noise subtraction method, which can automatically adapt to a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios, as long as a reasonable estimate of the noise spectrum can be obtained.

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Abstract: This paper describes a method for enhancing speech corrupted by broadband noise. The method is based on the spectral noise subtraction method. The original method entails subtracting an estimate of the noise power spectrum from the speech power spectrum, setting negative differences to zero, recombining the new power spectrum with the original phase, and then reconstructing the time waveform. While this method reduces the broadband noise, it also usually introduces an annoying "musical noise". We have devised a method that eliminates this "musical noise" while further reducing the background noise. The method consists in subtracting an overestimate of the noise power spectrum, and preventing the resultant spectral components from going below a preset minimum level (spectral floor). The method can automatically adapt to a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios, as long as a reasonable estimate of the noise spectrum can be obtained. Extensive listening tests were performed to determine the quality and intelligibility of speech enhanced by our method. Listeners unanimously preferred the quality of the processed speech. Also, for an input signal-to-noise ratio of 5 dB, there was no loss of intelligibility associated with the enhancement technique.

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1,296 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Kun Hu1, Plamen Ch. Ivanov2, Plamen Ch. Ivanov1, Zhi Chen1  +2 moreInstitutions (3)
26 Jun 2001-Physical Review E
TL;DR: It is shown how to use DFA appropriately to minimize the effects of trends, how to recognize if a crossover indicates indeed a transition from one type to a different type of underlying correlation, or if the crossover is due to a trend without any transition in the dynamical properties of the noise.

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Abstract: scaling behavior. We find that crossovers result from the competition between the scaling of the noise and the ‘‘apparent’’ scaling of the trend. We study how the characteristics of these crossovers depend on ~i! the slope of the linear trend; ~ii! the amplitude and period of the periodic trend; ~iii! the amplitude and power of the power-law trend, and ~iv! the length as well as the correlation properties of the noise. Surprisingly, we find that the crossovers in the scaling of noisy signals with trends also follow scaling laws—i.e., long-range power-law dependence of the position of the crossover on the parameters of the trends. We show that the DFA result of noise with a trend can be exactly determined by the superposition of the separate results of the DFA on the noise and on the trend, assuming that the noise and the trend are not correlated. If this superposition rule is not followed, this is an indication that the noise and the superposed trend are not independent, so that removing the trend could lead to changes in the correlation properties of the noise. In addition, we show how to use DFA appropriately to minimize the effects of trends, how to recognize if a crossover indicates indeed a transition from one type to a different type of underlying correlation, or if the crossover is due to a trend without any transition in the dynamical properties of the noise.

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1,163 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Nikolai M. Shapiro1, Michel Campillo2Institutions (2)
Abstract: [1] We demonstrate that the coherent information about the Earth structure can be extracted from the ambient seismic noise We compute cross-correlations of vertical component records of several days of seismic noise at different pairs of stations separated by distances from about one hundred to more than two thousand kilometers Coherent broadband dispersive wavetrains clearly emerge with group velocities similar to those predicted from the global Rayleigh-wave tomographic maps that have been constrained using ballistic surface waves Those results show that coherent Rayleigh waves can be extracted from the ambient seismic noise and that their dispersion characteristics can be measured in a broad range of periods This provides a source for new types of surface-wave measurements that can be obtained for numerous paths that could not be sampled with the ballistic waves and, therefore, can significantly improve the resolution of seismic images

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1,121 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Michael E. Mann1, Jonathan Lees1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 1996-Climatic Change
Abstract: We present a new technique for isolating climate signals in time series with a characteristic ‘red’ noise background which arises from temporal persistence. This background is estimated by a ‘robust’ procedure that, unlike conventional techniques, is largely unbiased by the presence of signals immersed in the noise. Making use of multiple-taper spectral analysis methods, the technique further provides for a distinction between purely harmonic (periodic) signals, and broader-band (‘quasiperiodic’) signals. The effectiveness of our signal detection procedure is demonstrated with synthetic examples that simulate a variety of possible periodic and quasiperiodic signals immersed in red noise. We apply our methodology to historical climate and paleoclimate time series examples. Analysis of a ≈ 3 million year sediment core reveals significant periodic components at known astronomical forcing periodicities and a significant quasiperiodic 100 year peak. Analysis of a roughly 1500 year tree-ring reconstruction of Scandinavian summer temperatures suggests significant quasiperiodic signals on a near-century timescale, an interdecadal 16–18 year timescale, within the interannual El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) band, and on a quasibiennial timescale. Analysis of the 144 year record of Great Salt Lake monthly volume change reveals a significant broad band of significant interdecadal variability, ENSO-timescale peaks, an annual cycle and its harmonics. Focusing in detail on the historical estimated global-average surface temperature record, we find a highly significant secular trend relative to the estimated red noise background, and weakly significant quasiperiodic signals within the ENSO band. Decadal and quasibiennial signals are marginally significant in this series.

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1,005 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202211
2021430
2020492
2019533
2018527
2017581

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

A. van der Ziel

71 papers, 971 citations

Christopher K. W. Tam

40 papers, 2K citations

Michael Shur

35 papers, 449 citations

Eddy Simoen

18 papers, 158 citations

Gijs Bosman

17 papers, 234 citations