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On-the-fly encryption

About: On-the-fly encryption is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 6607 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 154932 citation(s).
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Craig Gentry1
31 May 2009-
TL;DR: This work proposes a fully homomorphic encryption scheme that allows one to evaluate circuits over encrypted data without being able to decrypt, and describes a public key encryption scheme using ideal lattices that is almost bootstrappable.
Abstract: We propose a fully homomorphic encryption scheme -- i.e., a scheme that allows one to evaluate circuits over encrypted data without being able to decrypt. Our solution comes in three steps. First, we provide a general result -- that, to construct an encryption scheme that permits evaluation of arbitrary circuits, it suffices to construct an encryption scheme that can evaluate (slightly augmented versions of) its own decryption circuit; we call a scheme that can evaluate its (augmented) decryption circuit bootstrappable.Next, we describe a public key encryption scheme using ideal lattices that is almost bootstrappable.Lattice-based cryptosystems typically have decryption algorithms with low circuit complexity, often dominated by an inner product computation that is in NC1. Also, ideal lattices provide both additive and multiplicative homomorphisms (modulo a public-key ideal in a polynomial ring that is represented as a lattice), as needed to evaluate general circuits.Unfortunately, our initial scheme is not quite bootstrappable -- i.e., the depth that the scheme can correctly evaluate can be logarithmic in the lattice dimension, just like the depth of the decryption circuit, but the latter is greater than the former. In the final step, we show how to modify the scheme to reduce the depth of the decryption circuit, and thereby obtain a bootstrappable encryption scheme, without reducing the depth that the scheme can evaluate. Abstractly, we accomplish this by enabling the encrypter to start the decryption process, leaving less work for the decrypter, much like the server leaves less work for the decrypter in a server-aided cryptosystem.

4,940 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
20 May 2007-
TL;DR: A system for realizing complex access control on encrypted data that is conceptually closer to traditional access control methods such as role-based access control (RBAC) and secure against collusion attacks is presented.
Abstract: In several distributed systems a user should only be able to access data if a user posses a certain set of credentials or attributes. Currently, the only method for enforcing such policies is to employ a trusted server to store the data and mediate access control. However, if any server storing the data is compromised, then the confidentiality of the data will be compromised. In this paper we present a system for realizing complex access control on encrypted data that we call ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption. By using our techniques encrypted data can be kept confidential even if the storage server is untrusted; moreover, our methods are secure against collusion attacks. Previous attribute-based encryption systems used attributes to describe the encrypted data and built policies into user's keys; while in our system attributes are used to describe a user's credentials, and a party encrypting data determines a policy for who can decrypt. Thus, our methods are conceptually closer to traditional access control methods such as role-based access control (RBAC). In addition, we provide an implementation of our system and give performance measurements.

3,825 citations


4


Proceedings ArticleDOI
30 Oct 2006-
TL;DR: This work develops a new cryptosystem for fine-grained sharing of encrypted data that is compatible with Hierarchical Identity-Based Encryption (HIBE), and demonstrates the applicability of the construction to sharing of audit-log information and broadcast encryption.
Abstract: As more sensitive data is shared and stored by third-party sites on the Internet, there will be a need to encrypt data stored at these sites. One drawback of encrypting data, is that it can be selectively shared only at a coarse-grained level (i.e., giving another party your private key). We develop a new cryptosystem for fine-grained sharing of encrypted data that we call Key-Policy Attribute-Based Encryption (KP-ABE). In our cryptosystem, ciphertexts are labeled with sets of attributes and private keys are associated with access structures that control which ciphertexts a user is able to decrypt. We demonstrate the applicability of our construction to sharing of audit-log information and broadcast encryption. Our construction supports delegation of private keys which subsumesHierarchical Identity-Based Encryption (HIBE).

3,765 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Use of encryption to achieve authenticated communication in computer networks is discussed and example protocols are presented for the establishment of authenticated connections, for the management of authenticated mail, and for signature verification and document integrity guarantee.
Abstract: Use of encryption to achieve authenticated communication in computer networks is discussed. Example protocols are presented for the establishment of authenticated connections, for the management of authenticated mail, and for signature verification and document integrity guarantee. Both conventional and public-key encryption algorithms are considered as the basis for protocols.

2,622 citations


01 Jan 2009-
TL;DR: This work designs a somewhat homomorphic "boostrappable" encryption scheme that works when the function f is the scheme's own decryption function, and shows how, through recursive self-embedding, bootstrappable encryption gives fully homomorphic encryption.
Abstract: We propose the first fully homomorphic encryption scheme, solving an old open problem. Such a scheme allows one to compute arbitrary functions over encrypted data without the decryption key—i.e., given encryptions E(m1), ..., E( mt) of m1, ..., m t, one can efficiently compute a compact ciphertext that encrypts f(m1, ..., m t) for any efficiently computable function f. Fully homomorphic encryption has numerous applications. For example, it enables encrypted search engine queries—i.e., a search engine can give you a succinct encrypted answer to your (boolean) query without even knowing what your query was. It also enables searching on encrypted data; you can store your encrypted data on a remote server, and later have the server retrieve only files that (when decrypted) satisfy some boolean constraint, even though the server cannot decrypt the files on its own. More broadly, it improves the efficiency of secure multiparty computation. In our solution, we begin by designing a somewhat homomorphic "boostrappable" encryption scheme that works when the function f is the scheme's own decryption function. We then show how, through recursive self-embedding, bootstrappable encryption gives fully homomorphic encryption.

2,194 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20214
202011
201928
201843
2017338
2016554

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Willy Susilo

11 papers, 596 citations

Brant L. Candelore

10 papers, 931 citations

Andreas Uhl

9 papers, 240 citations

Xiaofeng Chen

8 papers, 298 citations

Keith Alexander Harrison

8 papers, 157 citations