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Ophiolite

About: Ophiolite is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7366 publications have been published within this topic receiving 289064 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Karakaya marginal sea was already closed by earliest Jurassic times because early Jurassic sediments unconformably overlie its deformed lithologies as discussed by the authors, and it was closed by collision of the Bitlis-Poturge fragment with Arabia.

2,899 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Central Asian Orogenic Belt ( c. 1000-250 Ma) formed by accretion of island arcs, ophiolites, oceanic islands, seamounts, accretionary wedges, and oceanic plateaux and microcontinents in a manner comparable with that of circum-Pacific Mesozoic-Cenozoic orogens is studied in this article.
Abstract: The Central Asian Orogenic Belt ( c . 1000–250 Ma) formed by accretion of island arcs, ophiolites, oceanic islands, seamounts, accretionary wedges, oceanic plateaux and microcontinents in a manner comparable with that of circum-Pacific Mesozoic–Cenozoic accretionary orogens. Palaeomagnetic and palaeofloral data indicate that early accretion (Vendian–Ordovician) took place when Baltica and Siberia were separated by a wide ocean. Island arcs and Precambrian microcontinents accreted to the active margins of the two continents or amalgamated in an oceanic setting (as in Kazakhstan) by roll-back and collision, forming a huge accretionary collage. The Palaeo-Asian Ocean closed in the Permian with formation of the Solonker suture. We evaluate contrasting tectonic models for the evolution of the orogenic belt. Current information provides little support for the main tenets of the one- or three-arc Kipchak model; current data suggest that an archipelago-type (Indonesian) model is more viable. Some diagnostic features of ridge–trench interaction are present in the Central Asian orogen (e.g. granites, adakites, boninites, near-trench magmatism, Alaskan-type mafic–ultramafic complexes, high-temperature metamorphic belts that prograde rapidly from low-grade belts, rhyolitic ash-fall tuffs). They offer a promising perspective for future investigations.

2,662 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2008-Lithos
TL;DR: Two geochemical proxies are particularly important for the identification and classification of oceanic basalts: the Th-Nb proxy for crustal input and hence for demonstrating an oceanic, non-subduction setting; and the Ti-Yb proxy, for melting depth and hence indicating mantle temperature and thickness of the conductive lithosphere as mentioned in this paper.

2,487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors applied the Ti/V plot to published data on ophiolites from a variety of postulated settings and in general supported the conclusions of previous investigators.

2,056 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The composition of chromian spinels in alpine-type peridotites has a large reciprocal range of Cr and Al, with increasing Cr# (Cr/(Cr+Al)) reflecting increasing degrees of partial melting in the mantle as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The composition of chromian spinel in alpine-type peridotites has a large reciprocal range of Cr and Al, with increasing Cr# (Cr/(Cr+Al)) reflecting increasing degrees of partial melting in the mantle. Using spinel compositions, alpine-type peridotites can be divided into three groups. Type I peridotites and associated volcanic rocks contain spinels with Cr# 0.60, and Type II peridotites and volcanics are a transitional group and contain spinels spanning the full range of spinel compositions in Type I and Type II peridotites. Spinels in abyssal peridotites lie entirely within the Type I spinel field, making ophiolites with Type I alpine-type peridotites the most likely candidates for sections of ocean lithosphere formed at a midocean ridge. The only modern analogs for Type III peridotites and associated volcanic rocks are found in arc-related volcanic and intrusive rocks, continental intrusive assemblages, and oceanic plateau basalts. We infer a sub-volcanic arc petrogenesis for most Type III alpine-type peridotites. Type II alpine-type peridotites apparently reflect composite origins, such as the formation of an island-arc on ocean crust, resulting in large variations in the degree and provenance of melting over relatively short distances. The essential difference between Type I and Type III peridotites appears to be the presence or absence of diopside in the residue at the end of melting.

1,884 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023172
2022344
2021266
2020279
2019234
2018212