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Ordinal data

About: Ordinal data is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 2853 publications have been published within this topic receiving 92009 citations. The topic is also known as: ordinal data & Ordinal scale.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The brms package implements Bayesian multilevel models in R using the probabilistic programming language Stan, allowing users to fit linear, robust linear, binomial, Poisson, survival, ordinal, zero-inflated, hurdle, and even non-linear models all in a multileVEL context.
Abstract: The brms package implements Bayesian multilevel models in R using the probabilistic programming language Stan. A wide range of distributions and link functions are supported, allowing users to fit - among others - linear, robust linear, binomial, Poisson, survival, ordinal, zero-inflated, hurdle, and even non-linear models all in a multilevel context. Further modeling options include autocorrelation of the response variable, user defined covariance structures, censored data, as well as meta-analytic standard errors. Prior specifications are flexible and explicitly encourage users to apply prior distributions that actually reflect their beliefs. In addition, model fit can easily be assessed and compared with the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion and leave-one-out cross-validation.

4,353 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a general class of regression models for ordinal data is developed and discussed, which utilize the ordinal nature of the data by describing various modes of stochastic ordering and this eliminates the need for assigning scores or otherwise assuming cardinality instead of ordinality.
Abstract: SUMMARY A general class of regression models for ordinal data is developed and discussed. These models utilize the ordinal nature of the data by describing various modes of stochastic ordering and this eliminates the need for assigning scores or otherwise assuming cardinality instead of ordinality. Two models in particular, the proportional odds and the proportional hazards models are likely to be most useful in practice because of the simplicity of their interpretation. These linear models are shown to be multivariate extensions of generalized linear models. Extensions to non-linear models are discussed and it is shown that even here the method of iteratively reweighted least squares converges to the maximum likelihood estimate, a property which greatly simplifies the necessary computation. Applications are discussed with the aid of examples.

3,647 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aim of this tutorial is to guide researchers and clinicians in the appropriate use and interpretation of correlation coefficients.
Abstract: Correlation in the broadest sense is a measure of an association between variables. In correlated data, the change in the magnitude of 1 variable is associated with a change in the magnitude of another variable, either in the same (positive correlation) or in the opposite (negative correlation) direction. Most often, the term correlation is used in the context of a linear relationship between 2 continuous variables and expressed as Pearson product-moment correlation. The Pearson correlation coefficient is typically used for jointly normally distributed data (data that follow a bivariate normal distribution). For nonnormally distributed continuous data, for ordinal data, or for data with relevant outliers, a Spearman rank correlation can be used as a measure of a monotonic association. Both correlation coefficients are scaled such that they range from -1 to +1, where 0 indicates that there is no linear or monotonic association, and the relationship gets stronger and ultimately approaches a straight line (Pearson correlation) or a constantly increasing or decreasing curve (Spearman correlation) as the coefficient approaches an absolute value of 1. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals can be used to address the statistical significance of the results and to estimate the strength of the relationship in the population from which the data were sampled. The aim of this tutorial is to guide researchers and clinicians in the appropriate use and interpretation of correlation coefficients.

3,452 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an extension of the dichotomous probit model for ordinal dependent variables is presented. But the model assumes that the ordinal nature of the observed dependent variable is due to methodological limitations in collecting the data, which force the researcher to lump together and identify various portions of an interval level variable.
Abstract: This paper develops a model, with assumptions similar to those of the linear model, for use when the observed dependent variable is ordinal. This model is an extension of the dichotomous probit model, and assumes that the ordinal nature of the observed dependent variable is due to methodological limitations in collecting the data, which force the researcher to lump together and identify various portions of an (otherwise) interval level variable. The model assumes a linear eflect of each independent variable as well as a series of break points between categories for the dependent variable. Maximum likelihood estimators are found for these parameters, along with their asymptotic sampling distributions, and an analogue of R 2 (the coefficient of determination in regression analysis) is defined to measure goodness of fit. The use of the model is illustrated with an analysis of Congressional voting on the 1965 Medicare Bill.

2,520 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Estimation of polychoric correlations is robust to modest violations of underlying normality and WLS performed adequately only at the largest sample size but led to substantial estimation difficulties with smaller samples.
Abstract: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is widely used for examining hypothesized relations among ordinal variables (e.g., Likert-type items). A theoretically appropriate method fits the CFA model to polychoric correlations using either weighted least squares (WLS) or robust WLS. Importantly, this approach assumes that a continuous, normal latent process determines each observed variable. The extent to which violations of this assumption undermine CFA estimation is not well-known. In this article, the authors empirically study this issue using a computer simulation study. The results suggest that estimation of polychoric correlations is robust to modest violations of underlying normality. Further, WLS performed adequately only at the largest sample size but led to substantial estimation difficulties with smaller samples. Finally, robust WLS performed well across all conditions.

2,354 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023115
2022211
202197
202096
2019109
2018115