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Oyster

About: Oyster is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 9425 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 187752 citation(s). The topic is also known as: oysters.


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Journal ArticleDOI
04 Oct 2012-Nature
TL;DR: The sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy and transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell are reported, showing that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes.
Abstract: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.

1,560 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Native oyster reefs once dominated many estuaries, ecologically and economically. Centuries of resource extraction exacerbated by coastal degradation have pushed oyster reefs to the brink of functional extinction worldwide. We examined the condition of oyster reefs across 144 bays and 44 ecoregions; our comparisons of past with present abundances indicate that more than 90% of them have been lost in bays (70%) and ecoregions (63%). In many bays, more than 99% of oyster reefs have been lost and are functionally extinct. Overall, we estimate that 85% of oyster reefs have been lost globally. Most of the world's remaining wild capture of native oysters (> 75%) comes from just five ecoregions in North America, yet the condition of reefs in these ecoregions is poor at best, except in the Gulf of Mexico. We identify many cost-effective solutions for conservation, restoration, and the management of fisheries and nonnative species that could reverse these oyster losses and restore reef ecosystem services.

782 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence is provided that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring, providing ground-breaking data on microplastic impacts in an invertebrate model, helping to predict ecological impact in marine ecosystems.
Abstract: Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L−1) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (−38%), diameter (−5%), and sperm velocity (−23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring.

733 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: [1] Ocean acidification resulting from human emissions of carbon dioxide has already lowered and will further lower surface ocean pH. The consequent decrease in calcium carbonate saturation potentially threatens calcareous marine organisms. Here, we demonstrate that the calcification rates of the edible mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) decline linearly with increasing pCO2. Mussel and oyster calcification may decrease by 25 and 10%, respectively, by the end of the century, following the IPCC IS92a scenario (∼740 ppmv in 2100). Moreover, mussels dissolve at pCO2 values exceeding a threshold value of ∼1800 ppmv. As these two species are important ecosystem engineers in coastal ecosystems and represent a large part of worldwide aquaculture production, the predicted decrease of calcification in response to ocean acidification will probably have an impact on coastal biodiversity and ecosystem functioning as well as potentially lead to significant economic loss.

684 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The family Ostreidae consists of a large number of edible and nonedible oysters, confined to a broad belt of coastal waters within the latitudes 64° N. and 44° S, with few exceptions oysters thrive in shallow water.
Abstract: NOTE.-Approved for publication April 24, 1964. The family Ostreidae consists of a large number of edible and nonedible oysters. Their distribution is confined to a broad belt of coastal waters within the latitudes 64° N. and 44° S. With few exceptions oysters thrive in shallow water, their vertical distribution extending from a level approximately halfway between high and low tide levels to a depth of about 100 feet. Commercially exploited oyster beds are rarely found below a depth of 40 feet. The· name "Ostrea" was given by Linnaeus (1758) to a number of mollusks which he described as follows: "Ostrea. Animal Tethys, testa bivalvis inaequivalvis, subaurita. Cardo edentulus and fossula cava ovata, striisque lateralibus transversis. Vulva anusve nullus." The name Tethys (from Greek mythology and also refers to the sea) applies to the type of marine animals, living either within the shells or naked, that Linnaeus listed under a general name "Vermes" which includes worms, mollusks, echinoderms, and others. The translation of Linnaeus' diagnosis reads as follows: Shell bivalve, unequal, almost ear-shaped. Hinge toothless, depression concave and oval-shaped, with transverse lines on the sides. No vulva or anus. Taxonomic characters _ SheIL _ Anatomy _ Sex and spawnlng _ Habitat _ Larvll! shell (Prodlssoconch) _ The genera of living oysters _ Genus 08trea _ Genus Cra8808trea _ Genus Pycnodonte _ Bibliography _ Page

500 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202210
2021396
2020431
2019408
2018459
2017480