scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Patriarchy

About: Patriarchy is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4259 publications have been published within this topic receiving 76027 citations. The topic is also known as: patriarchal system.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
23 Jun 2006
TL;DR: This article explored the various ways in which race and gender intersect in shaping structural and political aspects of violence against women of color and found that the interests and experiences of women of colour are frequently marginalized within both feminist and antiracist discourses.
Abstract: Identity-based politics has been a source of strength for people of color, gays and lesbians, among others. The problem with identity politics is that it often conflates intra group differences. Exploring the various ways in which race and gender intersect in shaping structural and political aspects of violence against these women, it appears the interests and experiences of women of color are frequently marginalized within both feminist and antiracist discourses. Both discourses have failed to consider the intersections of racism and patriarchy. However, the location of women of color at the intersection of race and gender makes our actual experience of domestic violence, rape, and remedial reform quite different from that of white women. Similarly, both feminist and antiracist politics have functioned in tandem to marginalize the issue of violence against women of color. The effort to politicize violence against women will do little to address the experiences of nonwhite women until the ramifications of racial stratification among women are acknowledged. At the same time, the anti-racist agenda will not be furthered by suppressing the reality of intra-racial violence against women of color. The effect of both these marginalizations is that women of color have no ready means to link their experiences with those of other women.

2,665 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that women strategize within a set of concrete constraints, which they identify as patriarchal bargains, and that different forms of patriarchy present women with distinct rules of the game and call for different strategies to maximize security and optimize life options with varying potential for active or passive resistance in the face of oppression.
Abstract: This article argues that systematic comparative analyses of women's strategies and coping mechanisms lead to a more culturally and temporally grounded understanding of patriarchal systems than the unqualified, abstract notion of patriarchy encountered in contemporary feminist theory. Women strategize within a set of concrete constraints, which I identify as patriarchal bargains. Different forms of patriarchy present women with distinct “rules of the game” and call for different strategies to maximize security and optimize life options with varying potential for active or passive resistance in the face of oppression. Two systems of male dominance are contrasted: the sub-Saharan African pattern, in which the insecurities of polygyny are matched with areas of relative autonomy for women, and classic patriarchy, which is characteristic of South and East Asia as well as the Muslim Middle East. The article ends with an analysis of the conditions leading to the breakdown and transformation of patriarchal bargain...

2,123 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: Lerner's radical review of Western civilization as mentioned in this paper shows that male dominance over women has nothing to do with biology, and everything to do cultural and historical habits, and that women's roles in society can be altered by similar means.
Abstract: When precisely did the ideas, symbols and metaphors of patriarchy take hold of Western civilization? When were women, so central to the creation of society, moved on to the sidelines? Where is the evidence to support the notion that male dominance over women is a natural state of things? Gerda Lerner's radical review of Western civilization shows that male dominance over women has nothing to do with biology, and everything to do with cultural and historical habits. Dr Lerner draws her evidence from a host of archaeological, literary, and artistic sources, using them to pinpoint the critical turning points in the allocation of women's roles in society. She draws especially on archaeological evidence of the cultures of ancient Hebrew and Mesopotamian societies, cultures from which modern Western civilization has largely derived. This approach enables her to trace the ways in which men and women have been classified as essentially separate creatures - from ancient Greek philosophy onwards - and also to examine ways in which their experience of society differs, through the structures and symbols of class and religion. Most of all, by showing patriarchy as the result of an historical process, Lerner produces an irresistable argument that it can be altered, and ended, by similar means.

1,173 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Narrative
64.2K papers, 1.1M citations
83% related
Ideology
54.2K papers, 1.1M citations
83% related
Politics
263.7K papers, 5.3M citations
82% related
Argument
41K papers, 755.9K citations
81% related
Social change
61.1K papers, 1.7M citations
80% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023366
2022762
2021169
2020229
2019208
2018194