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Pneumatic actuator

About: Pneumatic actuator is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 7895 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 87219 citation(s). The topic is also known as: pneumatic cylinder.

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Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1109/70.481753
Ching-Ping Chou1, Blake Hannaford1Institutions (1)
01 Feb 1996-
Abstract: This paper reports mechanical testing the modeling results for the McKibben artificial muscle pneumatic actuator. This device contains an expanding tube surrounded by braided cords. We report static and dynamic length-tension testing results and derive a linearized model of these properties for three different models. The results are briefly compared with human muscle properties to evaluate the suitability of McKibben actuators for human muscle emulation in biologically based robot arms.

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1,255 Citations


Patent
23 May 1980-
Abstract: A surgical stapler powered by a relatively low pressure gas supply contained in the stapler. The stapler has a mechanical linkage between the pneumatic actuator and the staple driver with a differential mechanical advantage to match the substantially constant force provided by the pneumatic actuator to the different forces required to first advance and then form the staple. This mechanical linkage allows use of a relatively small low pressure actuator and also substantially increases the efficiency with which the gas supply is utilized.

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Topics: Pneumatic actuator (59%), Actuator (50%)

985 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1109/TMECH.2002.1011262
Abstract: The Rutgers Master II-ND glove is a haptic interface designed for dextrous interactions with virtual environments. The glove provides force feedback up to 16 N each to the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingertips. It uses custom pneumatic actuators arranged in a direct-drive configuration in the palm. Unlike commercial haptic gloves, the direct-drive actuators make unnecessary cables and pulleys, resulting in a more compact and lighter structure. The force-feedback structure also serves as position measuring exoskeleton, by integrating noncontact Hall-effect and infrared sensors. The glove is connected to a haptic-control interface that reads its sensors and servos its actuators. The interface has pneumatic servovalves, signal conditioning electronics, A/D/A boards, power supply and an imbedded Pentium PC. This distributed computing assures much faster control bandwidth than would otherwise be possible. Communication with the host PC is done over an RS232 line. Comparative data with the CyberGrasp commercial haptic glove is presented.

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  • Fig. 7. Solenoid valves performance. (a) Matrix at 10 Hz. (b) Matrix at 1 Hz. (c) Response bandwidth versus air flow. (d) Characteristic curve of matrixregulator with two valves [12]. © Rutger University CAIP Center. Reprinted by permission.
    Fig. 7. Solenoid valves performance. (a) Matrix at 10 Hz. (b) Matrix at 1 Hz. (c) Response bandwidth versus air flow. (d) Characteristic curve of matrixregulator with two valves [12]. © Rutger University CAIP Center. Reprinted by permission.
  • TABLE I COMPARISON BETWEEN THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THERMII VERSUS THECYBERGRASP/CYBERGLOVE [1]. (© RUTGERS UNIVERSITY CAIP CENTER. REPRINTED BY PERMISSION)
    TABLE I COMPARISON BETWEEN THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THERMII VERSUS THECYBERGRASP/CYBERGLOVE [1]. (© RUTGERS UNIVERSITY CAIP CENTER. REPRINTED BY PERMISSION)
  • Fig. 9. The CyberGrasp haptic glove. Photo courtesy of Immersion Co. Reprinted by permission.
    Fig. 9. The CyberGrasp haptic glove. Photo courtesy of Immersion Co. Reprinted by permission.
  • Fig. 3. Calibration curve for the piston IR position sensor. © Rutgers University CAIP Center. Reprinted by permission.
    Fig. 3. Calibration curve for the piston IR position sensor. © Rutgers University CAIP Center. Reprinted by permission.
Topics: Wired glove (66%), Haptic technology (53%), Pneumatic actuator (51%)

549 Citations


Open accessJournal Article
Frank Daerden1, Dirk Lefeber1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This article is intended as an introduction to and an overview of Pneumatic Artificial Muscles (PAMs). These are pneumatic actuators made mainly of a flexible and inflatable membrane. First, their concept and way of operation are explained. Next, the properties of these actuators are given, the most important of which are the compliant behavior and extremely low weight. A classification and review is following this section. Typical applications are dealt with in the last but one section and, finally, some concluding remarks are made.

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546 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1002/ADFM.201102978
Abstract: The development of soft pneumatic actuators based on composites consisting of elastomers with embedded sheet or fiber structures (e.g., paper or fabric) that are flexible but not extensible is described. On pneumatic inflation, these actuators move anisotropically, based on the motions accessible by their composite structures. They are inexpensive, simple to fabricate, light in weight, and easy to actuate. This class of structure is versatile: the same principles of design lead to actuators that respond to pressurization with a wide range of motions (bending, extension, contraction, twisting, and others). Paper, when used to introduce anisotropy into elastomers, can be readily folded into 3D structures following the principles of origami; these folded structures increase the stiffness and anisotropy of the elastomeric actuators, while being light in weight. These soft actuators can manipulate objects with moderate performance; for example, they can lift loads up to 120 times their weight. They can also be combined with other components, for example, electrical components, to increase their functionality.

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  • Figure 8. Bellows actuators, fabricated by limiting the elongation of their pleats. a) A bellows actuator that bends in a U-shape. b) A bellows actuator with two bending modes. c) A bellows actuator with a strip (in red) limiting the expansion of the pleats. The strip was built on the outside of the device for the sake of clarity.
    Figure 8. Bellows actuators, fabricated by limiting the elongation of their pleats. a) A bellows actuator that bends in a U-shape. b) A bellows actuator with two bending modes. c) A bellows actuator with a strip (in red) limiting the expansion of the pleats. The strip was built on the outside of the device for the sake of clarity.
  • Figure 9. A twisting actuator with a helical patterned paper strip wrapped around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The three-dimensional pattern of the paper. b) The fabrication process is similar to the one shown in Figure 4: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first inserted into a cylindrical mold. An elastomer pre-mixtured is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. Finally, sealing the top and bottom completes the pneumatic channel. c), d), and e) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under an applied pressure of P1= 50 mbar and P2= 120 mbar respectively. f) and g) Pressure dependence of the twisting angle and the elongation after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles.
    Figure 9. A twisting actuator with a helical patterned paper strip wrapped around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The three-dimensional pattern of the paper. b) The fabrication process is similar to the one shown in Figure 4: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first inserted into a cylindrical mold. An elastomer pre-mixtured is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. Finally, sealing the top and bottom completes the pneumatic channel. c), d), and e) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under an applied pressure of P1= 50 mbar and P2= 120 mbar respectively. f) and g) Pressure dependence of the twisting angle and the elongation after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles.
  • Figure 4. A contracting actuator that is composed of longitudinally patterned paper stripes rolled around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The two-dimensional pattern of the paper. b) Schematic representation of the fabrication process: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first rolled into a cylinder, and inserted into a cylindrical mold. A pre-mixed elastomer is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. The pneumatic chamber is completed by sealing the top and bottom against two circular pieces of paper embedded in elastomer. c), d), and e) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under atmospheric pressure (Patm), P1= 80 mbar, and P2= 200 mbar, respectively. f) Dependence on pressure of the contraction factor (Eq. 1) after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles. The error bars show the standard deviation from the mean values.
    Figure 4. A contracting actuator that is composed of longitudinally patterned paper stripes rolled around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The two-dimensional pattern of the paper. b) Schematic representation of the fabrication process: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first rolled into a cylinder, and inserted into a cylindrical mold. A pre-mixed elastomer is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. The pneumatic chamber is completed by sealing the top and bottom against two circular pieces of paper embedded in elastomer. c), d), and e) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under atmospheric pressure (Patm), P1= 80 mbar, and P2= 200 mbar, respectively. f) Dependence on pressure of the contraction factor (Eq. 1) after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles. The error bars show the standard deviation from the mean values.
  • Figure 5. An elongation actuator with paper folded into a bellows-like pattern around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The three-dimensional bellows-like pattern of the paper. b) The fabrication process is similar to the one shown in Figure 3: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first inserted into a cylindrical mold. An elastomer pre-mixture is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. Finally, sealing the top and bottom completes the pneumatic channel. c) Pressure dependence of the extension (relative to its original length in the resting state) after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles. d), e), and f) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under atmospheric pressure (Patm), P1= 50 mbar, and P2= 170 mbar, respectively.
    Figure 5. An elongation actuator with paper folded into a bellows-like pattern around a cylindrical pneumatic channel. a) The three-dimensional bellows-like pattern of the paper. b) The fabrication process is similar to the one shown in Figure 3: the paper with the pattern shown in a) is first inserted into a cylindrical mold. An elastomer pre-mixture is then poured into the mold, and cured with the patterned paper embedded. Finally, sealing the top and bottom completes the pneumatic channel. c) Pressure dependence of the extension (relative to its original length in the resting state) after 50 pressurization/depressurization cycles. d), e), and f) show the resting and actuated states of such a device under atmospheric pressure (Patm), P1= 50 mbar, and P2= 170 mbar, respectively.
  • Figure 1. Schematic diagram outlining the fabrication of pneumatic soft actuators based on programmable paper-elastomer composites. a) Fabrication. First, an elastomer pre-mixture is poured over a mold with features designed to form the pneumatic channels. After curing, it is peeled off the mold, and placed in contact with a piece of paper soaked with uncured elastomer pre-mixture. Finally, the assembly is thermally cured to generate a sealed pneumatic channel. The final device is unsymmetrical in its mechanical response, because the top and bottom layers (elastomer and paper soaked with elastomer, respectively) have very different mechanical properties.
    Figure 1. Schematic diagram outlining the fabrication of pneumatic soft actuators based on programmable paper-elastomer composites. a) Fabrication. First, an elastomer pre-mixture is poured over a mold with features designed to form the pneumatic channels. After curing, it is peeled off the mold, and placed in contact with a piece of paper soaked with uncured elastomer pre-mixture. Finally, the assembly is thermally cured to generate a sealed pneumatic channel. The final device is unsymmetrical in its mechanical response, because the top and bottom layers (elastomer and paper soaked with elastomer, respectively) have very different mechanical properties.
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Topics: Pneumatic actuator (55%), Soft robotics (51%)

439 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20225
2021138
2020186
2019213
2018199
2017245

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Koichi Suzumori

81 papers, 1.2K citations

Ahmad Athif Mohd Faudzi

37 papers, 436 citations

Shuichi Wakimoto

32 papers, 527 citations

Shujiro Dohta

23 papers, 163 citations

Satoshi Konishi

17 papers, 232 citations

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