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Topic

Polygon

About: Polygon is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 12552 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 173923 citation(s). The topic is also known as: 2-polytope.


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Aug 1996
TL;DR: A data structure and an algorithm for efficient and exact interference detection amongst complex models undergoing rigid motion that can robustly and accurately detect all the contacts between large complex geometries composed of hundreds of thousands of polygons at interactive rates are presented.
Abstract: We present a data structure and an algorithm for efficient and exact interference detection amongst complex models undergoing rigid motion. The algorithm is applicable to all general polygonal models. It pre-computes a hierarchical representation of models using tight-fitting oriented bounding box trees (OBBTrees). At runtime, the algorithm traverses two such trees and tests for overlaps between oriented bounding boxes based on a separating axis theorem, which takes less than 200 operations in practice. It has been implemented and we compare its performance with other hierarchical data structures. In particular, it can robustly and accurately detect all the contacts between large complex geometries composed of hundreds of thousands of polygons at interactive rates. CR

2,177 citations

Book
Joseph O'Rourke1
01 Jan 1994
Abstract: From the Publisher: This is the newly revised and expanded edition of a popular introduction to the design and implementation of geometry algorithms arising in areas such as computer graphics, robotics, and engineering design. The basic techniques used in computational geometry are all covered: polygon triangualtions, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements, geometric searching, and motion planning. The self-contained treatment presumes only an elementary knowledge of mathematics, but it reaches topics on the frontier of current research. Thus professional programmers will find it a useful tutorial.

1,846 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1992
TL;DR: An application independent algorithm that uses local operations on geometry and topology to reduce the number of triangles in a triangle mesh and results from two different geometric modeling applications illustrate the strengths of the algorithm.
Abstract: The polygon remains a popular graphics primitive for computer graphics application. Besides having a simple representation, computer rendering of polygons is widely supported by commercial graphics hardware and software. However, because the polygon is linear, often thousands or millions of primitives are required to capture the details of complex geometry. Models of this size are generally not practical since rendering speeds and memory requirements are proportional to the number of polygons. Consequently applications that generate large polygonal meshes often use domain-specific knowledge to reduce model size. There remain algorithms, however, where domainspecific reduction techniques are not generally available or appropriate. One algorithm that generates many polygons is marching cubes. Marching cubes is a brute force surface construction algorithm that extracts isodensity surfaces from volume data, producing from one to five triangles within voxels that contain the surface. Although originally developed for medical applications, marching cubes has found more frequent use in scientific visualization where the size of the volume data sets are much smaller than those found in medical applications. A large computational fluid dynamics volume could have a finite difference grid size of order 100 by 100 by 100, while a typical medical computed tomography or magnetic resonance scanner produces over 100 slices at a resolution of 256 by 256 or 512 by 512 pixels each. Industrial computed tomography, used for inspection and analysis, has even greater resolution, varying from 512 by 512 to 1024 by 1024 pixels. For these sampled data sets, isosurface extraction using marching cubes can produce from 500k to 2,000k triangles. Even today’s graphics workstations have trouble storing and rendering models of this size. Other sampling devices can produce large polygonal models: range cameras, digital elevation data, and satellite data. The sampling resolution of these devices is also improving, resulting in model sizes that rival those obtained from medical scanners. This paper describes an application independent algorithm that uses local operations on geometry and topology to reduce the number of triangles in a triangle mesh. Although our implementation is for the triangle mesh, it can be directly applied to the more general polygon mesh. After describing other work related to model creation from sampled data, we describe the triangle decimation process and its implementation. Results from two different geometric modeling applications illustrate the strengths of the algorithm.

1,755 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
Abstract: Polygon partitions Orthogonal polygons Mobile guards Miscellaneous shapes Holes Exterior visibility Visibility groups Visibility algorithms Minimal guard covers Three-dimensions and miscellany.

1,511 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
24 Jul 1994
TL;DR: A method for combining a collection of range images into a single polygonal mesh that completely describes an object to the extent that it is visible from the outside is presented.
Abstract: Range imaging offers an inexpensive and accurate means for digitizing the shape of three-dimensional objects. Because most objects self occlude, no single range image suffices to describe the entire object. We present a method for combining a collection of range images into a single polygonal mesh that completely describes an object to the extent that it is visible from the outside.The steps in our method are: 1) align the meshes with each other using a modified iterated closest-point algorithm, 2) zipper together adjacent meshes to form a continuous surface that correctly captures the topology of the object, and 3) compute local weighted averages of surface positions on all meshes to form a consensus surface geometry.Our system differs from previous approaches in that it is incremental; scans are acquired and combined one at a time. This approach allows us to acquire and combine large numbers of scans with minimal storage overhead. Our largest models contain up to 360,000 triangles. All the steps needed to digitize an object that requires up to 10 range scans can be performed using our system with five minutes of user interaction and a few hours of compute time. We show two models created using our method with range data from a commercial rangefinder that employs laser stripe technology.

1,439 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20226
2021319
2020443
2019420
2018419
2017438