scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Pottery

About: Pottery is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 11063 publications have been published within this topic receiving 109737 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence of close contact between Buto's Egyptian residents and the Sumerians of southern Mesopotamia, who fashioned the world's first full-fledged civilization and state institutions during the last half of the 4th millennium B.C. is found.
Abstract: I nvestigators from the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo, Egypt, make an annual slog through the Nile Delta to the waterlogged site of Buto, the legendary ancient capital of Lower Egypt. Strategically located near the Mediterranean Sea, Buto was a major port during the 4th millennium B.C. -a poorly understood period of Egyptian history preceding the emergence of the pharaohs around 3100 B.C. During four field seasons that began in 1983, the German researchers repeatedly drilled through the mud, sand and watersaturated soil covering Buto until they reached pottery fragments and other ancient debris. Since 1987, the investigators have siphoned off groundwater at the spot with diesel-driven pumps and then carefully dug into Buto's muddy remains. Their dirty work is yielding important evidence not only about Lower Egypt's early days but also about the world's first civilization, which began developing in Mesopotamia around 5,400 years ago. "We've found the first archaeological evidence of cultural unification in Egypt at the end of the 4th millennium B.C., before the first dynasty of pharaohs appeared," says project director Thomas von der Way. Excavations show that during the final stages of the predynastic era at Buto, local methods of pottery and stone-blade production were replaced by more advanced techniques that originated in Upper Egypt, which lay farther to the south. Apparently, Upper Egyptian invaders had conquered this prominent city and port, von der Way says. Some of the Upper-Egyptian-style pottery is poorly made and probably represents the handiwork of Buto residents who were allowed to stay on and adapt to the new regime, he maintains. Those individuals were most likely commoners, von der Way says, adding, "Buto's ruling class and its followers might in fact have been wiped out." Even more intriguing is evidence of close contact between Buto's Egyptian residents and the Sumerians of southern Mesopotamia (now southern Iraq), who fashioned the world's first full-fledged civilization and state institutions during the last half of the 4th millennium B.C. Not only does pottery at Buto display Mesopotamian features, but clay nails uncovered at the delta site are nearly identical to those used to decorate temples at sites such as Uruk the largest Sumerian settlement and the world's first city In Mesopotamia, workers inserted the nails into temple walls and painted their heads to form mosaics. The researchers also found a clay cone at Buto that closely resembles clay decorations placed in wall niches inside Mesopotamian temples.

1,552 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: A rich and comprehensive sourcebook, "Pottery Analysis" draws together diverse approaches to the study of pottery - archaeological, ethnographic, stylistic, functional, and physicochemical as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: A rich and comprehensive sourcebook, "Pottery Analysis" draws together diverse approaches to the study of pottery - archaeological, ethnographic, stylistic, functional, and physicochemical. Prudence M. Rice uses pottery as a starting point for insights into people and culture and examines in detail the methods for studying these fired clay vessels that have been used worldwide from prehistoric times to the present. "Pottery Analysis" is a classic in its field as well as an invaluable reference for all students of archaeology and ancient culture.

1,138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars from the early Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province in China have revealed that a mixed fermented beverage of rice, honey, and fruit was being produced as early as the seventh millennium before Christ.
Abstract: Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars from the early Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province in China have revealed that a mixed fermented beverage of rice, honey, and fruit (hawthorn fruit and/or grape) was being produced as early as the seventh millennium before Christ (B.C.). This prehistoric drink paved the way for unique cereal beverages of the proto-historic second millennium B.C., remarkably preserved as liquids inside sealed bronze vessels of the Shang and Western Zhou Dynasties. These findings provide direct evidence for fermented beverages in ancient Chinese culture, which were of considerable social, religious, and medical significance, and help elucidate their earliest descriptions in the Shang Dynasty oracle inscriptions.

775 citations

Book
01 Jan 1956
TL;DR: In this article, the chemical and physical characteristics of prewheel potters are described and analyzed in terms of their properties and properties, and methods of analysis and description of pre-wheel pottery are evaluated.
Abstract: This book describes the chemical and physical characteristics of ceramic materials and processes and evaluates methods of analysis and description in terms of archaeological objectives. Sections are devoted to the composition, sources and properties of ceramic materials, the techniques of prewheel potters, methods of analysis and description, and problems of pottery classification. Glossary and bibliography. -- ICCROM

548 citations

Book
01 Sep 1981

450 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Radiocarbon dating
8.2K papers, 224.9K citations
82% related
Painting
20.2K papers, 142.3K citations
77% related
Subsistence agriculture
8K papers, 156.8K citations
75% related
Cultural heritage
28.2K papers, 273.8K citations
73% related
Empire
38.8K papers, 581.7K citations
73% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023477
20221,065
2021261
2020354
2019381
2018402