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Psychotropic drug

About: Psychotropic drug is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2309 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 54070 citation(s).


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TL;DR: To evaluate critically the evidence linking psychotropic drugs with falls in older people, a large number of studies have found no link between these drugs and falls in adults over the age of 65.
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate critically the evidence linking psychotropic drugs with falls in older people. DESIGN: Fixed-effects meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: English-language articles in MEDLINE (1966 – March 1996) indexed under accidents or accidental falls and aged or age factors; bibliographies of retrieved papers. STUDY SELECTION: Systematic evaluation of sedative/hypnotic, antidepressant, or neuroleptic use with falling in people aged 60 and older. DATA EXTRACTION: Study design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, setting, sample size, response rate, mean age, method of medication verification and fall assessment, fall definition, and the number of fallers and non-fallers taking specific classes of psychotropic drugs. RESULTS: Forty studies, none randomized controlled trials, met eligibility criteria. For one or more falls, the pooled odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.73 (95%CI, 1.52-1.97) for any psychotropic use; 1.50 (95%CI, 1.25-1.79) for neuroleptic use; 1.54 (95%CI, 1.40-1.70) for sedative/hypnotic use; 1.66 (95%CI, 1.4-1.95) for any antidepressant use (mainly TCAs); 1.51 (95%CI, 1.14-2.00) for only TCA use; and 1.48 (95%CI, 1.23-1.77) for benzodiazepine use, with no difference between short and long acting benzodiazepines. For neuroleptics in psychiatric inpatients, the pooled OR was 0.41 (95%CI, 0.21-.82); for all other patients, the pooled OR was 1.66 (95%CI, 1.38-2.00). Comparing ≥1 with ≥ 2 falls, mean subject age >75 versus ≥ 75 years old, communities with >35% versus ≥35% fallers, or subject place of residence did not affect the pooled OR. Increased falls occurred in patients taking more than one psychotropic drug. CONCLUSION: There is a small, but consistent, association between the use of most classes of psychotropic drugs and falls. The evidence to date, however, is based solely on observational data, with minimal adjustment for confounders, dosage, or duration of therapy. The incidence of falls and their consequences in this population necessitate that future large randomized controlled trials of any medication in older persons should measure falls prospectively as an adverse outcome event.

1,121 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 Feb 2000-JAMA
Abstract: ContextRecent reports on the use of psychotropic medications for preschool-aged children with behavioral and emotional disorders warrant further examination of trends in the type and extent of drug therapy and sociodemographic correlates.ObjectivesTo determine the prevalence of psychotropic medication use in preschool-aged youths and to show utilization trends across a 5-year span.DesignAmbulatory care prescription records from 2 state Medicaid programs and a salaried group-model health maintenance organization (HMO) were used to perform a population-based analysis of three 1-year cross-sectional data sets (for the years 1991, 1993, and 1995).Setting and ParticipantsFrom 1991 to 1995, the number of enrollees aged 2 through 4 years in a Midwestern state Medicaid (MWM) program ranged from 146,369 to 158,060; in a mid-Atlantic state Medicaid (MAM) program, from 34,842 to 54,237; and in an HMO setting in the Northwest, from 19,107 to 19,322.Main Outcome MeasuresTotal, age-specific, and gender-specific utilization prevalences per 1000 enrollees for 3 major psychotropic drug classes (stimulants, antidepressants, and neuroleptics) and 2 leading psychotherapeutic medications (methylphenidate and clonidine); rates of increased use of these drugs from 1991 to 1995, compared across the 3 sites.ResultsThe 1995 rank order of total prevalence in preschoolers (per 1000) in the MWM program was: stimulants (12.3), 90% of which represents methylphenidate (11.1); antidepressants (3.2); clonidine (2.3); and neuroleptics (0.9). A similar rank order was observed for the MAM program, while the HMO had nearly 3 times more clonidine than antidepressant use (1.9 vs 0.7). Sizable increases in prevalence were noted between 1991 and 1995 across the 3 sites for clonidine, stimulants, and antidepressants, while neuroleptic use increased only slightly. Methylphenidate prevalence in 2 through 4-year-olds increased at each site: MWM, 3-fold; MAM, 1.7-fold; and HMO, 3.1-fold. Decreases occurred in the relative proportions of previously dominant psychotherapeutic agents in the stimulant and antidepressant classes, while increases occurred for newer, less established agents.ConclusionsIn all 3 data sources, psychotropic medications prescribed for preschoolers increased dramatically between 1991 and 1995. The predominance of medications with off-label (unlabeled) indications calls for prospective community-based, multidimensional outcome studies.

817 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: While insomnia was associated with depressive disorder and chronic medical illness, adjustment for these factors only partially accounted for the association of insomnia with disability and with health care utilization.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The prevalence, burden, and management of insomnia among primary care patients were evaluated METHOD: Consecutive patients aged 18 to 65 years in primary care clinics of a staff-model health maintenance organization (N = 1,962) were screened with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire A stratified random sample (N = 373) completed face-to-face diagnostic assessments including the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a brief self-rated disability questionnaire (Brief Disability Questionnaire), and the interviewer-rated Social Disability Schedule A telephone follow-up survey was completed 3 months later Use of psychotropic drugs, use of mental health services, and direct health care costs were assessed by using the health plan's automated data systems RESULTS: Approximately 10% of the primary care patients reported major current insomnia (eg, taking at least 2 hours to fall asleep nearly every night) Current insomnia was associated with significantly greater functional impairment (according to both Brief Disability Questionnaire and Social Disability Schedule), more days of disability due to health problems, and greater general medical service utilization While insomnia was associated with depressive disorder and chronic medical illness, adjustment for these factors only partially accounted for the association of insomnia with disability and with health care utilization Of the patients with current insomnia, 28% received any psychotropic drug; 14% received benzodiazepines and 19% received antidepressants CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia among primary care patients is associated with greater functional impairment, lost productivity, and excess health care utilization Language: en

609 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although no clear relationship exists between the clinical efficacy, plasma concentration of SSRIs, nor any threshold that defines toxic concentrations, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be useful in special populations, such as in elderly patients, poor metabolizers (PM) of sparteine or mephenytoin (CYP2C19), and patients with liver and kidney impairment.
Abstract: The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have emerged as a major therapeutic advance in psychopharmacology. As a result, the discovery of these agents marks a milestone in neuropsychopharmacology and rational drug design, and has launched a new era in psychotropic drug development. Prior to the SSRIs, all psychotropic medications were the result of chance observation. In an attempt to develop a SSRI, researchers discovered a number of nontricyclic agents with amine-uptake inhibitory properties, acting on both noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons with considerable differences in potency. A given drug may affect one or more sites over its clinically relevant dosing range and may produce multiple and different clinical effects. The enhanced safety profile includes a reduced likelihood of pharmacodynamically mediated adverse drug-drug interactions by avoiding affects on sites that are not essential to the intended outcome. SSRIs were developed for inhibition of the neuronal uptake pump for serotonin (5-HT), a property shared with the TCAs, but without affecting the other various neuroreceptors or fast sodium channels. The therapeutic mechanism of action of SSRIs involves alteration in the 5-HT system. The plethora of biological substrates, receptors and pathways for 5-HT are candidates to mediate not only the therapeutic actions of SSRIs, but also their side effects. A hypothesis to explain these immediate side effects is that 5-HT is increased at specific 5-HT receptor subtypes in discrete regions of the body where the relevant physiologic processes are regulated. Marked differences exist between the SSRIs with regard to effects on specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, and thus the likelihood of clinically important pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Although no clear relationship exists between the clinical efficacy, plasma concentration of SSRIs, nor any threshold that defines toxic concentrations, but therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be useful in special populations, such as in elderly patients, poor metabolizers (PM) of sparteine (CYP2D6) or mephenytoin (CYP2C19), and patients with liver and kidney impairment. Several meta-analyses have reviewed the comparative efficacy of TCAs and SSRIs, and concluded that both TCAs and SSRIs have similar efficacy in the treatment of depression. SSRIs have demonstrated better efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). They have also been found to be effective in the treatment for social anxiety disorder both in reducing total levels of social anxiety and in improving overall clinical condition. The benefit of SSRIs in anorexia nervosa (AN) is apparently short-term unless medication is given in the context of nutritional or behavioral therapy. No single antidepressant can ever be recommended for every patient, but in a vast majority of patients, SSRIs should be considered as one of the first-line drugs in the treatment of depression.

544 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
J. G. Reilly1, Salma Ayis1, I. N. Ferrier1, S Jones1, Shl Thomas1 
TL;DR: Antipsychotic drugs cause QTc lengthening in a dose-related manner, and risks are substantially higher for thioridazine and droperidol, which may confer an increased risk of drug-induced arrhythmia.
Abstract: Summary Background Sudden unexplained death in psychiatric patients may be due to drug-induced arrhythmia, of which lengthening of the rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) on the electrocardiogram is a predictive marker. We estimated the point prevalence of QTc lengthening in psychiatric patients and the effects of various psychotropic drugs. Methods Electrocardiograms were obtained from 101 healthy reference individuals and 495 psychiatric patients in various inpatient and community settings and were analysed with a previously validated digitiser technique. Patients with and without QTc lengthening, QTc dispersion, and T-wave abnormality were compared by logistic regression to calculate odds ratios for predictive variables. Findings Abnormal QTc waas defined from the healthy reference group as more than 456 ms and was present in 8% (40 of 495) of patients. Age over 65 years (odds ratio 3·0 [95% CI 1·1–8·3]), use of tricyclic antidepressants (4·4 [1·6–12·1]), thioridazine (5·4 [2·0–13·7]), and droperidol (6·7 [1·8–24·8]) were robust predictors of QTc lengthening, as was antipsychotic dose (high dose 5·3 [1·2–24·4]; very high dose 8·2 [1·5–43·6]). Abnormal QT dispersion or Twave abnormalities were not significantly associated with antipsychotic treatment, but were associated with lithium therapy. Interpretation Antipsychotic drugs cause QTc lengthening in a dose-related manner. Risks are substantially higher for thioridazine and droperidol. These drugs may therefore confer an increased risk of drug-induced arrhythmia.

532 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202173
202058
201960
201876
201773