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Quantum harmonic oscillator

About: Quantum harmonic oscillator is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3235 publications have been published within this topic receiving 58053 citations. The topic is also known as: Quantum harmonic oscillator.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an action principle technique for the direct computation of expectation values is described and illustrated in detail by a special physical example, the effect on an oscillator of another physical system, which has the advantage of combining immediate physical applicability (e.g., resistive damping or maser amplification of a single electromagnetic cavity mode) with a significant idealization of the complex problems encountered in many particle and relativistic fieldtheory.
Abstract: An action principle technique for the direct computation of expectation values is described and illustrated in detail by a special physical example, the effect on an oscillator of another physical system. This simple problem has the advantage of combining immediate physical applicability (e.g., resistive damping or maser amplification of a single electromagnetic cavity mode) with a significant idealization of the complex problems encountered in many‐particle and relativistic fieldtheory. Successive sections contain discussions of the oscillator subjected to external forces, the oscillator loosely coupled to the external system, an improved treatment of this problem and, finally, there is a brief account of a general formulation.

2,222 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Oct 2011-Nature
TL;DR: In this article, a coupled, nanoscale optical and mechanical resonator formed in a silicon microchip is used to cool the mechanical motion down to its quantum ground state (reaching an average phonon occupancy number of 0.85±0.08).
Abstract: The simple mechanical oscillator, canonically consisting of a coupled mass–spring system, is used in a wide variety of sensitive measurements, including the detection of weak forces and small masses. On the one hand, a classical oscillator has a well-defined amplitude of motion; a quantum oscillator, on the other hand, has a lowest-energy state, or ground state, with a finite-amplitude uncertainty corresponding to zero-point motion. On the macroscopic scale of our everyday experience, owing to interactions with its highly fluctuating thermal environment a mechanical oscillator is filled with many energy quanta and its quantum nature is all but hidden. Recently, in experiments performed at temperatures of a few hundredths of a kelvin, engineered nanomechanical resonators coupled to electrical circuits have been measured to be oscillating in their quantum ground state. These experiments, in addition to providing a glimpse into the underlying quantum behaviour of mesoscopic systems consisting of billions of atoms, represent the initial steps towards the use of mechanical devices as tools for quantum metrology or as a means of coupling hybrid quantum systems. Here we report the development of a coupled, nanoscale optical and mechanical resonator formed in a silicon microchip, in which radiation pressure from a laser is used to cool the mechanical motion down to its quantum ground state (reaching an average phonon occupancy number of 0.85±0.08). This cooling is realized at an environmental temperature of 20 K, roughly one thousand times larger than in previous experiments and paves the way for optical control of mesoscale mechanical oscillators in the quantum regime.

2,073 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The quantum group SU(2)q is discussed in this paper by a method analogous to that used by Schwinger to develop the quantum theory of angular momentum such theory of the q-analogue of the quantum harmonic oscillator, as is required for this purpose.
Abstract: The quantum group SU(2)q is discussed by a method analogous to that used by Schwinger to develop the quantum theory of angular momentum Such theory of the q-analogue of the quantum harmonic oscillator, as is required for this purpose, is developed

1,555 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
L C Biedenharn1
TL;DR: In this article, a new realisation of the quantum group SUq(2) is constructed by means of a q-analogue to the Jordan-Schwinger mapping, determining thereby both the complete representation structure and qanalogues to the Wigner and Racah operators.
Abstract: A new realisation of the quantum group SUq(2) is constructed by means of a q-analogue to the Jordan-Schwinger mapping, determining thereby both the complete representation structure and q-analogues to the Wigner and Racah operators. To achieve this realisation, a new elementary object is defined, a q-analogue to the harmonic oscillator. The uncertainty relation for position and momentum in a q-harmonic oscillator is quite unusual.

1,414 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a sparse regression method for discovering the governing partial differential equation(s) of a given system by time series measurements in the spatial domain, which relies on sparsitypromoting techniques to select the nonlinear and partial derivative terms of the governing equations that most accurately represent the data, bypassing a combinatorially large search through all possible candidate models.
Abstract: We propose a sparse regression method capable of discovering the governing partial differential equation(s) of a given system by time series measurements in the spatial domain. The regression framework relies on sparsity-promoting techniques to select the nonlinear and partial derivative terms of the governing equations that most accurately represent the data, bypassing a combinatorially large search through all possible candidate models. The method balances model complexity and regression accuracy by selecting a parsimonious model via Pareto analysis. Time series measurements can be made in an Eulerian framework, where the sensors are fixed spatially, or in a Lagrangian framework, where the sensors move with the dynamics. The method is computationally efficient, robust, and demonstrated to work on a variety of canonical problems spanning a number of scientific domains including Navier-Stokes, the quantum harmonic oscillator, and the diffusion equation. Moreover, the method is capable of disambiguating between potentially nonunique dynamical terms by using multiple time series taken with different initial data. Thus, for a traveling wave, the method can distinguish between a linear wave equation and the Korteweg–de Vries equation, for instance. The method provides a promising new technique for discovering governing equations and physical laws in parameterized spatiotemporal systems, where first-principles derivations are intractable.

1,069 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202325
202260
2021124
202097
2019108
201877