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Rainbow table

About: Rainbow table is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 488 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 11528 citation(s).


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1997
TL;DR: This paper describes a new algorithm for best matching prefix using binary search on hash tables organized by prefix lengths that scales very well as address and routing table sizes increase and introduces Mutating Binary Search and other optimizations that considerably reduce the average number of hashes to less than 2.
Abstract: Internet address lookup is a challenging problem because of increasing routing table sizes, increased traffic, higher speed links, and the migration to 128 bit IPv6 addresses. IP routing lookup requires computing the best matching prefix, for which standard solutions like hashing were believed to be inapplicable. The best existing solution we know of, BSD radix tries, scales badly as IP moves to 128 bit addresses. Our paper describes a new algorithm for best matching prefix using binary search on hash tables organized by prefix lengths. Our scheme scales very well as address and routing table sizes increase: independent of the table size, it requires a worst case time of log2(address bits) hash lookups. Thus only 5 hash lookups are needed for IPv4 and 7 for IPv6. We also introduce Mutating Binary Search and other optimizations that, for a typical IPv4 backbone router with over 33,000 entries, considerably reduce the average number of hashes to less than 2, of which one hash can be simplified to an indexed array access. We expect similar average case behavior for IPv6.

921 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A probabilistic method is presented which cryptanalyzes any N key cryptosystem in N 2/3 operational with N2/3 words of memory after a precomputation which requires N operations, and works in a chosen plaintext attack and can also be used in a ciphertext-only attack.
Abstract: A probabilistic method is presented which cryptanalyzes any N key cryptosystem in N^{2/3} operational with N^{2/3} words of memory (average values) after a precomputation which requires N operations. If the precomputation can be performed in a reasonable time period (e.g, several years), the additional computation required to recover each key compares very favorably with the N operations required by an exhaustive search and the N words of memory required by table lookup. When applied to the Data Encryption Standard (DES) used in block mode, it indicates that solutions should cost between 1 and 100 each. The method works in a chosen plaintext attack and, if cipher block chaining is not used, can also be used in a ciphertext-only attack.

704 citations

Book ChapterDOI
17 Aug 2003
TL;DR: A new way of precalculating the data is proposed which reduces by two the number of calculations needed during cryptanalysis and it is shown that the gain could be even much higher depending on the parameters used.
Abstract: In 1980 Martin Hellman described a cryptanalytic time-memory trade-off which reduces the time of cryptanalysis by using precalculated data stored in memory. This technique was improved by Rivest before 1982 with the introduction of distinguished points which drastically reduces the number of memory lookups during cryptanalysis. This improved technique has been studied extensively but no new optimisations have been published ever since. We propose a new way of precalculating the data which reduces by two the number of calculations needed during cryptanalysis. Moreover, since the method does not make use of distinguished points, it reduces the overhead due to the variable chain length, which again significantly reduces the number of calculations. As an example we have implemented an attack on MS-Windows password hashes. Using 1.4GB of data (two CD-ROMs) we can crack 99.9% of all alphanumerical passwords hashes (237) in 13.6 seconds whereas it takes 101 seconds with the current approach using distinguished points. We show that the gain could be even much higher depending on the parameters used.

503 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
17 May 2009
TL;DR: This paper discusses a new method that generates password structures in highest probability order by automatically creating a probabilistic context-free grammar based upon a training set of previously disclosed passwords, and then generating word-mangling rules to be used in password cracking.
Abstract: Choosing the most effective word-mangling rules to use when performing a dictionary-based password cracking attack can be a difficult task In this paper we discuss a new method that generates password structures in highest probability order We first automatically create a probabilistic context-free grammar based upon a training set of previously disclosed passwords This grammar then allows us to generate word-mangling rules, and from them, password guesses to be used in password cracking We will also show that this approach seems to provide a more effective way to crack passwords as compared to traditional methods by testing our tools and techniques on real password sets In one series of experiments, training on a set of disclosed passwords, our approach was able to crack 28% to 129% more passwords than John the Ripper, a publicly available standard password cracking program

411 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 Aug 2005
TL;DR: This work presents a novel hash table data structure and lookup algorithm which improves the performance over a naive hash table by reducing the number of memory accesses needed for the most time-consuming lookups, which allows designers to achieve higher lookup performance for a given memory bandwidth.
Abstract: Hash tables are fundamental components of several network processing algorithms and applications, including route lookup, packet classification, per-flow state management and network monitoring. These applications, which typically occur in the data-path of high-speed routers, must process and forward packets with little or no buffer, making it important to maintain wire-speed throughout. A poorly designed hash table can critically affect the worst-case throughput of an application, since the number of memory accesses required for each lookup can vary. Hence, high throughput applications require hash tables with more predictable worst-case lookup performance. While published papers often assume that hash table lookups take constant time, there is significant variation in the number of items that must be accessed in a typical hash table search, leading to search times that vary by a factor of four or more.We present a novel hash table data structure and lookup algorithm which improves the performance over a naive hash table by reducing the number of memory accesses needed for the most time-consuming lookups. This allows designers to achieve higher lookup performance for a given memory bandwidth, without requiring large amounts of buffering in front of the lookup engine. Our algorithm extends the multiple-hashing Bloom Filter data structure to support exact matches and exploits recent advances in embedded memory technology. Through a combination of analysis and simulations we show that our algorithm is significantly faster than a naive hash table using the same amount of memory, hence it can support better throughput for router applications that use hash tables.

396 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20215
20206
201911
201810
201729
201630