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Ranking

About: Ranking is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 18728 publications have been published within this topic receiving 434028 citations.


Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
Frank Wilcoxon1
TL;DR: The comparison of two treatments generally falls into one of the following two categories: (a) a number of replications for each of the two treatments, which are unpaired, or (b) we may have a series of paired comparisons, some of which may be positive and some negative as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The comparison of two treatments generally falls into one of the following two categories: (a) we may have a number of replications for each of the two treatments, which are unpaired, or (b) we may have a number of paired comparisons leading to a series of differences, some of which may be positive and some negative. The appropriate methods for testing the significance of the differences of the means in these two cases are described in most of the textbooks on statistical methods.

12,871 citations

Book
01 Jan 1948
TL;DR: The measurement of rank correlation was introduced in this paper, and rank correlation tied ranks tests of significance were applied to the problem of m ranking, and variate values were used to measure rank correlation.
Abstract: The measurement of rank correlation introduction to the general theory of rank correlation tied ranks tests of significance proof of the results of chapter 4 the problem of m ranking proof of the result of chapter 6 partial rank correlation ranks and variate values proof of the result of chapter 9 paired comparisons proof of the results of chapter 11 some further applications.

6,404 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compare the predictive accuracy of various methods in a set of representative problem domains, including correlation coefficients, vector-based similarity calculations, and statistical Bayesian methods.
Abstract: Collaborative filtering or recommender systems use a database about user preferences to predict additional topics or products a new user might like. In this paper we describe several algorithms designed for this task, including techniques based on correlation coefficients, vector-based similarity calculations, and statistical Bayesian methods. We compare the predictive accuracy of the various methods in a set of representative problem domains. We use two basic classes of evaluation metrics. The first characterizes accuracy over a set of individual predictions in terms of average absolute deviation. The second estimates the utility of a ranked list of suggested items. This metric uses an estimate of the probability that a user will see a recommendation in an ordered list. Experiments were run for datasets associated with 3 application areas, 4 experimental protocols, and the 2 evaluation metrics for the various algorithms. Results indicate that for a wide range of conditions, Bayesian networks with decision trees at each node and correlation methods outperform Bayesian-clustering and vector-similarity methods. Between correlation and Bayesian networks, the preferred method depends on the nature of the dataset, nature of the application (ranked versus one-by-one presentation), and the availability of votes with which to make predictions. Other considerations include the size of database, speed of predictions, and learning time.

4,883 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Jul 2002
TL;DR: The goal of this paper is to develop a method that utilizes clickthrough data for training, namely the query-log of the search engine in connection with the log of links the users clicked on in the presented ranking.
Abstract: This paper presents an approach to automatically optimizing the retrieval quality of search engines using clickthrough data. Intuitively, a good information retrieval system should present relevant documents high in the ranking, with less relevant documents following below. While previous approaches to learning retrieval functions from examples exist, they typically require training data generated from relevance judgments by experts. This makes them difficult and expensive to apply. The goal of this paper is to develop a method that utilizes clickthrough data for training, namely the query-log of the search engine in connection with the log of links the users clicked on in the presented ranking. Such clickthrough data is available in abundance and can be recorded at very low cost. Taking a Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach, this paper presents a method for learning retrieval functions. From a theoretical perspective, this method is shown to be well-founded in a risk minimization framework. Furthermore, it is shown to be feasible even for large sets of queries and features. The theoretical results are verified in a controlled experiment. It shows that the method can effectively adapt the retrieval function of a meta-search engine to a particular group of users, outperforming Google in terms of retrieval quality after only a couple of hundred training examples.

4,453 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1980-Ecology
TL;DR: This paper proposes a new method, based on ranks of components by usage and by availability, that results in a ranking of the components on the basis of preference, and permits significance tests of the ranking.
Abstract: Modern ecological research often involves the comparison of the usage of habitat types or food items to the availability of those resources to the animal. Widely used methods of determining preference from measurements of usage and availability depend critically on the array of components that the researcher, often with a degree of arbitrariness, deems available to the animal. This paper proposes a new method, based on ranks of components by usage and by availability. A virtue of the rank procedure is that it provides comparable results whether a questionable component is included or excluded from consideration. Statistical tests of significance are given for the method. The paper also offers a hierarchical ordering of selection processes. This hierarchy resolves certain inconsistencies among studies of selection and is compatible with the analytic technique offered in the paper. Central to the study of animal ecology is the usage an animal makes of its environment: specifically, the kinds of foods it consumes and the varieties of habitats it occupies. Many analytic procedures have been de- vised to treat data on the usage of such resources, particularly in relation to information on their avail- ability to the animal, for the purpose of determining "preference." The objectives of this report are to de- scribe the problem of determining preference by com- paring usage and availability data, to illustrate a seri- ous shortcoming in the routine application of most procedures for comparing these data, and to suggest a new method that resolves this difficulty. The pro- posed technique results in a ranking of the components on the basis of preference, and permits significance tests of the ranking.

4,041 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202217
20211,136
20201,294
20191,323
20181,224
20171,163