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Receptor

About: Receptor is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 159318 publications have been published within this topic receiving 8299881 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
19 Mar 2010-Cell
TL;DR: The role of PRRs, their signaling pathways, and how they control inflammatory responses are discussed.

6,987 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
20 Feb 1998-Cell
TL;DR: Two novel neuropeptides are identified, both derived from the same precursor by proteolytic processing, that bind and activate two closely related (previously) orphan G protein-coupled receptors in the hypothalamus of rats.

5,162 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 Nov 2003-Nature
TL;DR: It is found that a soluble form of ACE2, but not of the related enzyme ACE1, blocked association of the S1 domain with Vero E6 cells, indicating that ACE2 is a functional receptor for SARS-CoV.
Abstract: Spike (S) proteins of coronaviruses, including the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), associate with cellular receptors to mediate infection of their target cells Here we identify a metallopeptidase, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), isolated from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-permissive Vero E6 cells, that efficiently binds the S1 domain of the SARS-CoV S protein We found that a soluble form of ACE2, but not of the related enzyme ACE1, blocked association of the S1 domain with Vero E6 cells 293T cells transfected with ACE2, but not those transfected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 receptors, formed multinucleated syncytia with cells expressing S protein Furthermore, SARS-CoV replicated efficiently on ACE2-transfected but not mock-transfected 293T cells Finally, anti-ACE2 but not anti-ACE1 antibody blocked viral replication on Vero E6 cells Together our data indicate that ACE2 is a functional receptor for SARS-CoV

5,149 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
23 Oct 1987-Science
TL;DR: Together, the adhesion proteins and their receptors constitute a versatile recognition system providing cells with anchorage, traction for migration, and signals for polarity, position, differentiation, and possibly growth.
Abstract: Rapid progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular interactions that result in cell adhesion. Many adhesive proteins present in extracellular matrices and in the blood contain the tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) as their cell recognition site. These proteins include fibronectin, vitronectin, osteopontin, collagens, thrombospondin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor. The RGD sequences of each of the adhesive proteins are recognized by at least one member of a family of structurally related receptors, integrins, which are heterodimeric proteins with two membrane-spanning subunits. Some of these receptors bind to the RGD sequence of a single adhesion protein only, whereas others recognize groups of them. The conformation of the RGD sequence in the individual proteins may be critical to this recognition specificity. On the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, the receptors connect the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. More than ten proved or suspected RGD-containing adhesion-promoting proteins have already been identified, and the integrin family includes at least as many receptors recognizing these proteins. Together, the adhesion proteins and their receptors constitute a versatile recognition system providing cells with anchorage, traction for migration, and signals for polarity, position, differentiation, and possibly growth.

4,821 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence is accumulating that the signaling pathways associated with each TLR are not identical and may, therefore, result in different biological responses.
Abstract: Recognition of pathogens is mediated by a set of germline-encoded receptors that are referred to as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). These receptors recognize conserved molecular patterns (pathogen-associated molecular patterns), which are shared by large groups of microorganisms. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) function as the PRRs in mammals and play an essential role in the recognition of microbial components. The TLRs may also recognize endogenous ligands induced during the inflammatory response. Similar cytoplasmic domains allow TLRs to use the same signaling molecules used by the interleukin 1 receptors (IL-1Rs): these include MyD88, IL-1R--associated protein kinase and tumor necrosis factor receptor--activated factor 6. However, evidence is accumulating that the signaling pathways associated with each TLR are not identical and may, therefore, result in different biological responses.

4,686 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
20234,222
20226,323
20213,048
20203,388
20193,290