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Red leaf monkey

About: Red leaf monkey is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 3 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 229 citation(s).

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TL;DR: The biochemical profiles of the young leaf diet of these two monkeys were compared with previously published information on two African and one south Indian colobines and showed marked similarities between different animals, considering contrasts in their habitats.
Abstract: The diets of the banded leaf monkey (Presbytis melalophos) at Kuala Lompat in the Krau Game Reserve of West Malaysia and the red leaf monkey (Presbytis rubicunda) in Sepilok Virgin Jungle Reserve, Sabah, East Malaysia have been examined in relation to plant chemistry. Both monkeys spent about half their time eating foliage, and about half their time eating fruits and seeds. They both favoured leaves with high digestibility (due to relatively low levels of fibre) and high levels of protein, a combination found predominantly in young leaves and some flowers. The monkeys appeared to favour seeds and fruits with high concentrations of storage carbohydrates or fats, but not those rich in simple sugars. Selection of seeds and fruits was not correlated with protein content. An analysis of the fibre and protein contents of foods showed that, on an annual basis, the two monkeys achieved a comparable intake for both items. However, these diets were obtained in radically different ways. Presbytis melalophos was able to eat foliage from many of the common tree species in its home range, whereas P. rubicunda relied on rare trees and lianas. This difference is attributed to the very high density of Dipterocarpaceae at Sepilok, a tree family that provides little food for colobines. The rarity of P. rubicunda's food plants at Sepilok is considered to be the main reason for the greater home range size and lower population density in comparison to P. melalophos. Finally, the biochemical profiles of the young leaf diet of these two monkeys were compared with previously published information on two African and one south Indian colobines. In many respects the intake of supposed critical components, protein and fibre, showed marked similarities between different animals, considering contrasts in their habitats.

221 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The functional response in the seed predation behavior to fruiting seasonality of red leaf monkeys in Danum Valley, Sabah, northern Borneo demonstrated a functional response to mast fruiting, but found no support for the predator satiation hypothesis.
Abstract: The predator satiation hypothesis is one plausible explanation for masting in lowland dipterocarp forests in SE Asia. Hence, evaluation of behavioral patterns of seed predators have the potential to provide support fo r the predator satiation hypothesis. In order to evaluate possible mechanisms that could result in predator satiation, we studied the functional response in the seed predation behavior to fruiting seasonality of red leaf monkeys ( Presbytis rubicunda MA¼ller, 1838, Colobinae) in Danum Valley, Sabah, northern Borneo. Specifically, we sought to answer the two questions: (1) when fruit availability increases, to what extent do red leaf monkeys increase their seed eating? and (2) do red leaf monkeys change the degree to which they pursue one species of seeds in respon se to the changes in community-level fruit availability? In response to the increased fruit availability, red leaf monkeys extended their time spent feeding on seeds as much as 18 fold. This large functional response resulted from the elongated total feeding time and the preference for seeds by red leaf monkeys. Feeding time tended to increase, up to 28 % of the observation time, with increasing fruit availability. In response to increased fruiting seasonality, the monkeys increased the number of species and plant individuals upon whose seeds they depredated. Time spent feeding on seeds per species or individual, or for the most frequently eaten species or individual, was not affected by fruit availability. Similarly, the duration of one seed-feeding event was unaffected by the fruit availability. Hence, while our results demonstrate a functional response to mast fruiting, we found no support for the predator satiation hypothesis. The existence of an abundant alternative resource (young leaves) is one of several likely reasons for the weak persistence toward seeds shown by red leaf monkeys, whic h is contradictory to the assumption of the predator satiation hypothesis.

7 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20151
20131
19881