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Topic

Representation (systemics)

About: Representation (systemics) is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 33821 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 475461 citation(s).


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The performance of the spatial envelope model shows that specific information about object shape or identity is not a requirement for scene categorization and that modeling a holistic representation of the scene informs about its probable semantic category.
Abstract: In this paper, we propose a computational model of the recognition of real world scenes that bypasses the segmentation and the processing of individual objects or regions. The procedure is based on a very low dimensional representation of the scene, that we term the Spatial Envelope. We propose a set of perceptual dimensions (naturalness, openness, roughness, expansion, ruggedness) that represent the dominant spatial structure of a scene. Then, we show that these dimensions may be reliably estimated using spectral and coarsely localized information. The model generates a multidimensional space in which scenes sharing membership in semantic categories (e.g., streets, highways, coasts) are projected closed together. The performance of the spatial envelope model shows that specific information about object shape or identity is not a requirement for scene categorization and that modeling a holistic representation of the scene informs about its probable semantic category.

6,454 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Problem of Thomas Hobbes Formalistic Views of Representation as discussed by the authors : "Standing For", Descriptive Representation "Standing for", Symbolic Representation, and Acting as Acting for: The Analogies The Mandate-Independence Controversy Representing Unattached Interests: Burke Representing People Who Have Interests.
Abstract: Introduction The Problem of Thomas Hobbes Formalistic Views of Representation \"Standing For\": Descriptive Representation \"Standing For\": Symbolic Representation Representing as \"Acting For\": The Analogies The Mandate-Independence Controversy Representing Unattached Interests: Burke Representing People Who Have Interests: Liberalism Political Representation Appendix on Etymology Notes Bibliography Index

3,969 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: In this paper, a discussion of the requirement for different types of models for representing performance at the skill-, rule-, and knowledge-based levels, together with a review of the different levels in terms of signals, signs, and symbols is presented.
Abstract: The introduction of information technology based on digital computers for the design of man-machine interface systems has led to a requirement for consistent models of human performance in routine task environments and during unfamiliar task conditions. A discussion is presented of the requirement for different types of models for representing performance at the skill-, rule-, and knowledge-based levels, together with a review of the different levels in terms of signals, signs, and symbols. Particular attention is paid to the different possible ways of representing system properties which underlie knowledge-based performance and which can be characterised at several levels of abstraction-from the representation of physical form, through functional representation, to representation in terms of intention or purpose. Furthermore, the role of qualitative and quantitative models in the design and evaluation of interface systems is mentioned, and the need to consider such distinctions carefully is discussed.

2,961 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1983
TL;DR: A discussion is presented of the requirement for different types of models for representing performance at the skill-, rule-, and knowledge-based levels, together with a review of the different levels in terms of signals, signs, and symbols.
Abstract: The introduction of information technology based on digital computers for the design of man-machine interface systems has led to a requirement for consistent models of human performance in routine task environments and during unfamiliar task conditions. A discussion is presented of the requirement for different types of models for representing performance at the skill-, rule-, and knowledge-based levels, together with a review of the different levels in terms of signals, signs, and symbols. Particular attention is paid to the different possible ways of representing system properties which underlie knowledge-based performance and which can be characterised at several levels of abstraction-from the representation of physical form, through functional representation, to representation in terms of intention or purpose. Furthermore, the role of qualitative and quantitative models in the design and evaluation of interface systems is mentioned, and the need to consider such distinctions carefully is discussed.

2,535 citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202225
20211,580
20201,876
20191,935
20181,792
20171,391